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Dealing with Distractions

Dealing with Distractions

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    We each have many distractions that keep us from getting things done. I noticed a few prominent distractions in my life this week (Twitter and Digg are taking over!) and I felt that it was time to address the problem! I know that I am capable of getting things done and achieving things but I’ve noticed that distractions can get the better of me. When I’ve planned to research a topic for a new article, sometimes I “wake up” and realise that I’ve been browsing Digg for the past 30 minutes. Not only does this cut down the time I have in a day, but more than anything it hinders my ability to concentrate on the task.

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    I see concentration as being split into three different levels.

    The first level is acknowledging that I have work to do. I can sit down and make a start, but I’m vulnerable to distractions and they can easily get the better of me. At this stage it sometimes feels like I’m looking for an excuse not to work. My mind can easily wander onto other things, and I often think about what is happening on Twitter, and that 5 minutes checking it won’t hurt!

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    The second stage delves a little deeper, as I’m starting to understand the task and my mind starts to figure out what is going on. At this point some distractions die down as I start to get more involved with the task at hand, but there are a few that can still break my concentration. If I got a phone call at this point, I would probably find my way onto the Internet after that, and blame the person who called for distracting me!

    The final level of concentration is when I’m totally immersed in the work, I’m 100% focused and in the flow. At this point I’ve developed some form of “armor” against distractions and it takes a lot to pull me away from the task. We all produce our best work when we’re concentrating fully on the task, and it is this stage that is the most useful to us is any line of work.

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    Getting to the final stage of concentration is not always easy, and avoiding the minefield of distractions can be overwhelming at first, but if we sit down and just think about the distractions, it is usually simple enough to remove them. If we’re fully aware of what distracts us, and we consciously remove them, we can then start to concentrate on our work. The important point is to make sure that we get rid of them before we start anything, otherwise we’ll wake up from a daze and realise we’ve been doing something else for some time!

    Before I start writing an article, the first thing I do is disconnect from the Internet. The majority of my life seems to revolve around cyberspace and cutting off is the only way I can get anything done. When writing I use a program called PyRoom for Ubuntu (the equivalent of WriteRoom for Mac 0r Dark Room for Windows) which is a full screen text editor. I see nothing but a black screen with green text (like The Matrix) so I don’t get distracted by the formatting options and also the spell checker. When I make a spelling mistake in a word processor, the fact that it is underlined in red makes me want to click it right away and change it, and I lose my train of thought. I type up the draft in PyRoom and then copy and paste it to a word processor so that I can proofread it. I also have been experimenting with setting a specific time that I can browse Digg or check my Twitter updates. When I keep the distractions separated from the work, I don’t find myself thinking about what else I could be doing mid-paragraph.

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    Taking care of my distractions before I start any work allows me to concentrate on the task at hand as I don’t have any battles with an urge to check any social media updates because I’ve already disconnected myself from cyberspace.

    If we deal with distractions from the start, getting the work done becomes so much easier!

    Photo courtesy of tomsaint11

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    Last Updated on November 19, 2019

    7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy

    7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy

    “Busy” used to be a fair description of the typical schedule. More and more, though, “busy” simply doesn’t cut it.

    “Busy” has been replaced with “too busy”, “far too busy”, or “absolutely buried.” It’s true that being productive often means being busy…but it’s only true up to a point.

    As you likely know from personal experience, you can become so busy that you reach a tipping point…a point where your life tips over and falls apart because you can no longer withstand the weight of your commitments.

    Once you’ve reached that point, it becomes fairly obvious that you’ve over-committed yourself.

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    The trick, though, is to recognize the signs of “too busy” before you reach that tipping point. A little self-assessment and some proactive schedule-thinning can prevent you from having that meltdown.

    To help you in that self-assessment, here are 7 signs that you’re way too busy:

    1. You Can’t Remember the Last Time You Took a Day Off

    Occasional periods of rest are not unproductive, they are essential to productivity. Extended periods of non-stop activity result in fatigue, and fatigue results in lower-quality output. As Sydney J. Harris once said,

    “The time to relax is when you don’t have time for it.”

    2. Those Closest to You Have Stopped Asking for Your Time

    Why? They simply know that you have no time to give them. Your loved ones will be persistent for a long time, but once you reach the point where they’ve stopped asking, you’ve reached a dangerous level of busy.

    3. Activities like Eating Are Always Done in Tandem with Other Tasks

    If you constantly find yourself using meal times, car rides, etc. as times to catch up on emails, phone calls, or calendar readjustments, it’s time to lighten the load.

    It’s one thing to use your time efficiently. It’s a whole different ballgame, though, when you have so little time that you can’t even focus on feeding yourself.

    4. You’re Consistently More Tired When You Get up in the Morning Than You Are When You Go to Bed

    One of the surest signs of an overloaded schedule is morning fatigue. This is a good indication that you’ve not rested well during the night, which is a good sign that you’ve got way too much on your mind.

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    If you’ve got so much to do that you can’t even shut your mind down when you’re laying in bed, you’re too busy.

    5. The Most Exercise You Get Is Sprinting from One Commitment to the Next

    It’s proven that exercise promotes healthy lives. If you don’t care about that, that’s one thing. If you’d like to exercise, though, but you just don’t have time for it, you’re too busy.

    If the closest thing you get to exercise is running from your office to your car because you’re late for your ninth appointment of the day, it’s time to slow down.

    Try these 5 Ways to Find Time for Exercise.

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    6. You Dread Getting up in the Morning

    If your days are so crammed full that you literally dread even starting them, you’re too busy. A new day should hold at least a small level of refreshment and excitement. Scale back until you find that place again.

    7. “Survival Mode” Is Your Only Mode

    If you can’t remember what it feels like to be ahead of schedule, or at least “caught up”, you’re too busy.

    So, How To Get out of Busyness?

    Take a look at these articles to help you get unstuck:

    Featured photo credit: Khara Woods via unsplash.com

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