Advertising
Advertising

Are You Just Getting Warmed Up?

Are You Just Getting Warmed Up?
Warm Up

    It’s winter time here in the U.S. Parts of the country are covered with snow and ice, and getting going in the morning can be tough.

    Part of the morning ritual of a lot of folks during the winter is warming up the car. It may be covered with ice, or just plain cold, and it needs some time to get ready to go. Often this takes patience, especially when you’re in a hurry and running late. But it’s important and can improve the performance and life of your car.

    Advertising

    So here’s the thing – when it comes to your work, are you really procrastinating or just getting warmed up?

    I’m a reformed procrastinator, and have gone to great lengths not to slip-slide back into the hole of putting things off. But one thing I’ve learned is that there is a time to just be idle and let the engine get warmed up.

    Advertising

    Lots of productivity gurus recommend jumping right into work – maybe writing first thing for example – before doing anything else. I’ve tried it, and it doesn’t work for me. You see, I need time to get warmed up in the morning. I’m honestly not procrastinating in the traditional sense, but need some time to ramp up into my day. How do I know I’m not just slacking? Because when I jump right in, most of what I produce is crap. But if I give myself time to get warmed up – have some coffee, check some feeds, read some mail – when I do get to work, I’m way more productive. I’m also much more focused.

    Now, of course, this goes against the thinking of “never checking email first” or jumping right into your next actions. So I had to come to grips with the fact that I just work differently. You have to be honest with yourself, because I could easily be procrastinating and making excuses.

    Advertising

    The key is the work is getting done – usually ahead of schedule. So maybe you’re not slacking, but just taking time to get warmed up. Maybe you’re one of those that need to melt off the ice and clear the fog that accumulated over the night.

    Only you know for sure.

    Advertising

    Tony D. Clark writes, draws cartoons, designs software and websites, and spends a lot of time talking others into working from home, being creative, and doing what they love. His blog Success from the Nest helps people to design and run a home-based business that is in line with their unique gifts, values, personality, and world-view – all served up with humor and cartoons.

    More by this author

    Tony D. Clark

    Tony is the blog owner of "Success from the Nest". He aspires to help people do meaningful work and reach their dreams.

    Why Your Perception Is Your Reality Ultimate Pros and Cons Excel Workbook Lifehack.org Podcast Episode 7 – Trial By Fire Productivity Episode 2: Leon Ho Getting to Plumb How Do You Woo the Muse?

    Trending in Featured

    1 Face Adversity with a Smile 2 The Gentle Art of Saying No 3 What Is Speed Reading and How to Successfully Learn It 4 The Science of Setting Goals (And Its Effect on Your Brain) 5 How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on February 25, 2020

    Face Adversity with a Smile

    Face Adversity with a Smile

    I told my friend Graham that I often cycle the two miles from my house to the town centre but unfortunately there is a big hill on the route. He replied, ‘You mean fortunately.’ He explained that I should be glad of the extra exercise that the hill provided.

    My attitude to the hill has now changed. I used to grumble as I approached it but now I tell myself the following. This hill will exercise my heart and lungs. It will help me to lose weight and get fit. It will mean that I live longer. This hill is my friend. Finally as I wend my way up the incline I console myself with the thought of all those silly people who pay money to go to a gym and sit on stationery exercise bicycles when I can get the same value for free. I have a smug smile of satisfaction as I reach the top of the hill.

    Advertising

    Problems are there to be faced and overcome. We cannot achieve anything with an easy life. Helen Keller was the first deaf and blind person to gain a University degree. Her activism and writing proved inspirational. She wrote, “Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experiences of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, vision cleared, ambition inspired and success achieved.”

    One of the main determinants of success in life is our attitude towards adversity. From time to time we all face hardships, problems, accidents, afflictions and difficulties. Some are of our making but many confront us through no fault of our own. Whilst we cannot choose the adversity we can choose our attitude towards it.

    Advertising

    Douglas Bader was 21 when in 1931 he had both legs amputated following a flying accident. He was determined to fly again and went on to become one of the leading flying aces in the Battle of Britain with 22 aerial victories over the Germans. He was an inspiration to others during the war. He said, “Don’t listen to anyone who tells you that you can’t do this or that. That’s nonsense. Make up your mind, you’ll never use crutches or a stick, then have a go at everything. Go to school, join in all the games you can. Go anywhere you want to. But never, never let them persuade you that things are too difficult or impossible.”

    How can you change your attitude towards the adversity that you face? Try these steps:

    Advertising

    1. Confront the problem. Do not avoid it.
    2. Deliberately take a positive attitude and write down some benefits or advantages of the situation.
    3. Visualise how you will feel when you overcome this obstacle.
    4. Develop an action plan for how to tackle it.
    5. Smile and get cracking.

    The biographies of great people are littered with examples of how they took these kinds of steps to overcome the difficulties they faced. The common thread is that they did not become defeatist or depressed. They chose their attitude. They opted to be positive. They took on the challenge. They won.

    Featured photo credit: Jamie Brown via unsplash.com

    Advertising

    Read Next