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A Reinvention Revolution; 3 Sacred Cows to Start With

A Reinvention Revolution; 3 Sacred Cows to Start With

Reinvention is one of my favorite words these days. It actually started doing this rumba in my brain over a year ago, but back then I was pretty good at tuning out the music and ignoring it.

Not anymore.

I’ve become increasingly bothered by business people in my corner of the world settling for good enough that definitely is not good enough. It’s particularly annoying in regard to workforce discussions, with wannabe entrepreneurs and business owners complaining about labor and talent shortages, aging boomers and other workforce demographics making things tough on them and their prospects. The “oh woe is me” whining is driving me crazy.

Yes, I know the problems are real. However I have no patience for those who refuse to see that they must make some pretty revolutionary changes in their own business models and operational m.o.’s if they are ever to see that proverbial light at the end of the tunnel.

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The workplace labor and talent shortages we’re all experiencing in business aren’t going to miraculously get filled up if those “shortages” don’t start to look and feel much different. Our math in the “lose one, replace one” equation no longer computes; many of our old jobs have to be redesigned or reinvented for anyone to want them.

If you find you’re nodding your head right now, I’ve got a Reinvention Challenge for you. Are you feeling restless, rebellious, and perhaps even revolutionary? Great!

You can rid your workplace of the status quo, and lead the way with an organizational revolution which will turbo-boost your company with engaging, new-lease-on-life work at the same time, if you are willing to put some old standbys out to pasture. Here are the 3 sacred cows on my hit list:

Organizational Charts

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Organizational Charts proliferate hierarchies, and hierarchies mean there is too much protocol getting in the way of more productive relationships. The organizations which will thrive today must be more fluid and flexible, where people have the freedom to enlarge their circles of influence when they are willing and able to. People must feel they can readily team up in partnerships up, down, and all around them without worrying about delineated reporting structures. You needn’t fit your square peg in the right square box if there aren’t any boxes to pigeon-hole you in the first place.

Annual Performance Appraisals

I’ve ranted before about how poorly annual performance appraisals are done by most managers and won’t repeat those arguments now (although they still exist and are far too rampant). There are two specific ways annual performance appraisals sabotage business today by inhibiting reinvention; a) “annual” is way too slow, and we are all moving must faster than that, and b) nine times out of ten appraisals are somehow connected to compensation structures, and hence those aren’t being reinvented either. Capped out at a 3% increase in your annual review? So do you stop performing well after that? Or perhaps your window of opportunity isn’t included in this next one on my list…

Job Descriptions

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Job Descriptions give us low ceilings when the sky should be the limit. Look around you. With few exceptions, you’ll probably notice that most people at work are not fully engaged in their jobs 100% of the time. The world has changed all around us at an amazing pace, yet the vast majority of our jobs have not changed, and we’re bored with them. The job descriptions which map out recruitment efforts in most companies are still structured around sets of qualifications which are old and unexciting, and frankly, they don’t matter any more. Experience in old qualifications don’t necessarily equate to the capacity-stretching performance needed today, and they certainly don’t light our fire any longer.

So what do you say? Brave enough to put these on your hit list too?

Be a revolutionary and do some reinvention with me. Turn up the music and let’s rumba.

Article References:
The 3 New R’s: Restlessness, Revolution, and Reinvention
Everyday Performance Reviews
Adding Value to Performance Reviews
5 Questions for your Performance Appraisals
No Room for Mediocrity

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Rosa Say is the author of Managing with Aloha, Bringing Hawaii’s Universal Values to the Art of Business and the Talking Story blog. She is also the founder and head coach of Say Leadership Coaching, a company dedicated to bringing nobility to the working arts of management and leadership.

Rosa’s Previous Thursday Column was: Learn to Love Projects.

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Rosa Say

Rosa is an author and blogger who dedicates to helping people thrive in the work and live with purpose.

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Last Updated on August 6, 2020

Why Working 9 to 5 Is Outdated

Why Working 9 to 5 Is Outdated

Bristol is the most congested city in England. Whenever I have to work at the office, I ride there, like most of us do. Furthermore, I always make sure to go at off hours; otherwise, the roads are jam-packed with cars, buses, bikes, even pedestrians. Why is that? Because everyone is working a traditional 9 to 5 work day.

Where did the “9 to 5” Come From?

It all started back in 1946. The United States government implemented the 40 hour work week for all federal employees, and all companies adopted the practice afterwards. That’s 67 years with the same schedule. Let’s think about all the things that have changed in the 67 years:

  • We went to the moon, and astronauts now live in space on the ISS.

  • Computers used to take up entire rooms and took hours to make a single calculation. Now we have more powerful computers in our purses and back pockets with our smartphones.

  • Lots of employees can now telecommute to the office from hundreds, and even thousands of miles away.

In 1946 a 9-5 job made sense because we had time after 5pm for a social life, a family life. Now we’re constantly connected to other people and the office, with the Internet, email on our smartphones, and hashtags in our movies and television shows. There is no downtime anymore.

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Different Folks, Different Strokes

Enjoying your downtime is an important part of life. It recharges your batteries and lets you be more productive. Allowing people to balance life and work can provide them with much needed perspective and motivation to see the bigger picture of what they are trying to achieve.

Some people are just more productive when they’re working at their optimal time of day, after feeling well rested and personally fulfilled.  For some that can be  from 4 a.m. to 9 a.m; for others, it could be  2 p.m. to 7 p.m.

People have their own rhythms and routines. It would be great if we could sync our work schedule to match. Simply put, the imposed 8-hour work day can be a creativity and morale killer for the average person in today’s world.

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Productivity and Trust Killer

Fostering creativity among employees is not always an easy endeavor, but perhaps a good place to start is by simply not tying their tasks and goals to a fixed time period. Let them work on their to-do list at their own pace, and chances are, you’ll get the best out of your employee who feels empowered instead of babysat.

That’s not to say that you should  allow your team to run wild and do whatever they want, but restricting them to a 9 to 5 time frame can quickly demoralize people. Set parameters and deadlines, and let them work at their own creative best with the understanding that their work is crucial to the functioning of the entire team.

Margaret Heffernan, an entrepreneur who previously worked in broadcasting, noted to Inc that from her experience, “treating employees like grown-ups made it more likely that they would behave the same way.” The principle here is to have your employees work to get things done, not to just follow the hands on the clock.

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A Flexible Remote Working Policy

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer famously recalled all her remote workers, saying she wanted to improve innovation and collaboration, but was that the right decision? We’ve all said that we’re often more productive in a half day working from home than a full day working in the office, right? So why not let your employees work remotely from home?

There are definitely varying schools of thought on remote working. Some believe that innovation and collaboration can only happen in a boardroom with markers, whiteboards and post-it notes and of course, this can be true for some. But do a few great brainstorms trump a team that feels a little less stressed and a little more free?

Those who champion remote working often note that these employees are not counting the clock, worried about getting home, cooking dinner or rushing through errands post-work. No one works their 9-5 straight without breaks here and there.  Allowing some time for remote working means employees can handle some non-work related tasks and feel more accomplished throughout the day. Also, sometimes we all need to have a taste of working in our pajamas, right?

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It’ll be interesting to see how many traditional companies and industries start giving their employees more freedom with their work schedule. And how many end up rescinding their policies like Yahoo did.

What are your thoughts of the traditional 9-5 schedule and what are you doing to help foster your team’s productivity and creativity? Hit the comments and let us know.

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