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A Reinvention Revolution; 3 Sacred Cows to Start With

A Reinvention Revolution; 3 Sacred Cows to Start With

Reinvention is one of my favorite words these days. It actually started doing this rumba in my brain over a year ago, but back then I was pretty good at tuning out the music and ignoring it.

Not anymore.

I’ve become increasingly bothered by business people in my corner of the world settling for good enough that definitely is not good enough. It’s particularly annoying in regard to workforce discussions, with wannabe entrepreneurs and business owners complaining about labor and talent shortages, aging boomers and other workforce demographics making things tough on them and their prospects. The “oh woe is me” whining is driving me crazy.

Yes, I know the problems are real. However I have no patience for those who refuse to see that they must make some pretty revolutionary changes in their own business models and operational m.o.’s if they are ever to see that proverbial light at the end of the tunnel.

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The workplace labor and talent shortages we’re all experiencing in business aren’t going to miraculously get filled up if those “shortages” don’t start to look and feel much different. Our math in the “lose one, replace one” equation no longer computes; many of our old jobs have to be redesigned or reinvented for anyone to want them.

If you find you’re nodding your head right now, I’ve got a Reinvention Challenge for you. Are you feeling restless, rebellious, and perhaps even revolutionary? Great!

You can rid your workplace of the status quo, and lead the way with an organizational revolution which will turbo-boost your company with engaging, new-lease-on-life work at the same time, if you are willing to put some old standbys out to pasture. Here are the 3 sacred cows on my hit list:

Organizational Charts

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Organizational Charts proliferate hierarchies, and hierarchies mean there is too much protocol getting in the way of more productive relationships. The organizations which will thrive today must be more fluid and flexible, where people have the freedom to enlarge their circles of influence when they are willing and able to. People must feel they can readily team up in partnerships up, down, and all around them without worrying about delineated reporting structures. You needn’t fit your square peg in the right square box if there aren’t any boxes to pigeon-hole you in the first place.

Annual Performance Appraisals

I’ve ranted before about how poorly annual performance appraisals are done by most managers and won’t repeat those arguments now (although they still exist and are far too rampant). There are two specific ways annual performance appraisals sabotage business today by inhibiting reinvention; a) “annual” is way too slow, and we are all moving must faster than that, and b) nine times out of ten appraisals are somehow connected to compensation structures, and hence those aren’t being reinvented either. Capped out at a 3% increase in your annual review? So do you stop performing well after that? Or perhaps your window of opportunity isn’t included in this next one on my list…

Job Descriptions

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Job Descriptions give us low ceilings when the sky should be the limit. Look around you. With few exceptions, you’ll probably notice that most people at work are not fully engaged in their jobs 100% of the time. The world has changed all around us at an amazing pace, yet the vast majority of our jobs have not changed, and we’re bored with them. The job descriptions which map out recruitment efforts in most companies are still structured around sets of qualifications which are old and unexciting, and frankly, they don’t matter any more. Experience in old qualifications don’t necessarily equate to the capacity-stretching performance needed today, and they certainly don’t light our fire any longer.

So what do you say? Brave enough to put these on your hit list too?

Be a revolutionary and do some reinvention with me. Turn up the music and let’s rumba.

Article References:
The 3 New R’s: Restlessness, Revolution, and Reinvention
Everyday Performance Reviews
Adding Value to Performance Reviews
5 Questions for your Performance Appraisals
No Room for Mediocrity

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Rosa Say is the author of Managing with Aloha, Bringing Hawaii’s Universal Values to the Art of Business and the Talking Story blog. She is also the founder and head coach of Say Leadership Coaching, a company dedicated to bringing nobility to the working arts of management and leadership.

Rosa’s Previous Thursday Column was: Learn to Love Projects.

More by this author

Rosa Say

Rosa is an author and blogger who dedicates to helping people thrive in the work and live with purpose.

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Last Updated on July 8, 2020

How to Prevent Decision Fatigue From Clouding Your Judgement

How to Prevent Decision Fatigue From Clouding Your Judgement

What is decision fatigue? Let me explain this with an example:

When determining a court ruling, there are many factors that contribute to their final verdict. You probably assume that the judge’s decision is influenced solely by the nature of the crime committed or the particular laws that were broken. While this is completely valid, there is an even greater influential factor that dictates the judge’s decision: the time of day.

In 2012, a research team from Columbia University[1] examined 1,112 court rulings set in place by a Parole Board Judge over a 10 month period. The judge would have to determine whether the individuals in question would be released from prison on parole, or a change in the parole terms.

While the facts of the case often take precedence in decision making, the judges mental state had an alarming influence on their verdict.

As the day goes on, the chance of a favorable ruling drops:

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    Image source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

    Does the time of day, or the judges level of hunger really contribute that greatly to their decision making? Yes, it does.

    The research went on to show that at the start of the day the likelihood of the judging giving out a favorable ruling was somewhere around 65%.

    But as the morning dragged on, the judge became fatigued and drained from making decision after decision. As more time went on, the odds of receiving a favorable ruling decreased steadily until it was whittled down to zero.

    However, right after their lunch break, the judge would return to the courtroom feeling refreshed and recharged. Energized by their second wind, their leniency skyrockets back up to a whopping 65%. And again, as the day drags on to its finish, the favorable rulings slowly diminish along with the judge’s spirits.

    This is no coincidence. According to the carefully recorded research, this was true for all 1,112 cases. The severity of the crime didn’t matter. Whether it was rape, murder, theft, or embezzlement, the criminal was more likely to get a favorable ruling either early in the morning, or after the judges lunch break.

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    Are You Suffering from Decision Fatigue Too?

    We all suffer from decision fatigue without even realizing it.

    Perhaps you aren’t a judge with the fate of an individual’s life at your disposal, but the daily decisions you make for yourself could hinder you if you’re not in the right head-space.

    Regardless of how energetic you feel (as I imagine it is somehow caffeine induced anyway), you will still experience decision fatigue. Just like every other muscle, your brain gets tired after periods of overuse, pumping out one decision after the next. It needs a chance to rest in order to function at a productive rate.

    The Detrimental Consequences of Decision Fatigue

    When you are in a position such as a Judge, you can’t afford to let your mental state dictate your decision making; but it still does. According to George Lowenstein, an American educator and economy expert, decision fatigue is to blame for poor decision making among members of high office. The disastrous level of failure among these individuals to control their impulses could be directly related to their day to day stresses at work and their private life.

    When you’re just too tired to think, you stop caring. And once you get careless, that’s when you need to worry. Decision fatigue can contribute to a number of issues such as impulse shopping (guilty), poor decision making at work, and poor decision making with after work relationships. You know what I’m talking about. Don’t dip your pen in the company ink.

    How to Make Decision Effectively

    Either alter the time of decision making to when your mind is the most fresh, or limit the number of decisions to be made. Try utilizing the following hacks for more effective decision making.

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    1. Make Your Most Important Decisions within the First 3 Hours

    You want to make decisions at your peak performance, so either first thing in the morning, or right after a break.

    Research has actually shown that you are the most productive for the first 3 hours[2] of your day. Utilize this time! Don’t waste it on trivial decisions such as what to wear, or mindlessly scrolling through social media.

    Instead, use this time to tweak your game plan. What do you want to accomplish? What can you improve? What steps do you need to take to reach these goals?

    2. Form Habits to Reduce Decision Making

    You don’t have to choose all the time.

    Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but it doesn’t have to be an extravagant spread every morning. Make a habit out of eating a similar or quick breakfast, and cut that step of your morning out of the way. Can’t decide what to wear? Pick the first thing that catches your eye. We both know that after 20 minutes of changing outfits you’ll just go with the first thing anyway.

    Powerful individuals such as Steve Jobs, Barack Obama, and Mark Zuckerberg don’t waste their precious time deciding what to wear. In fact, they have been known to limiting their outfits down to two options in order to reduce their daily decision making.

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    3. Take Frequent Breaks for a Clearer Mind

    You are at your peak of productivity after a break, so to reap the benefits, you need to take lots of breaks! I know, what a sacrifice. If judges make better decisions in the morning and after their lunch break, then so will you.

    The reason for this is because the belly is now full, and the hunger is gone. Roy Baumeister, Florida State University social psychologist[3] had found that low-glucose levels take a negative toll on decision making. By taking a break to replenish your glucose levels, you will be able to focus better and improve your decision making abilities.

    Even if you aren’t hungry, little breaks are still necessary to let your mind refresh, and come back being able to think more clearly.

    Structure your break times. Decide beforehand when you will take breaks, and eat energy sustaining snacks so that your energy level doesn’t drop too low. The time you “lose” during your breaks will be made up in the end, as your productivity will increase after each break.

    So instead of slogging through your day, letting your mind deteriorate and fall victim to the daily abuses of decision making, take a break, eat a snack. Let your mind refresh and reset, and jump-start your productivity throughout the day.

    More Tips About Decision Making

    Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

    Reference

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