Advertising
Advertising

8 Ways to Feel Good at the End of the Work Day

8 Ways to Feel Good at the End of the Work Day


    At Lifehack we talk a lot about happiness, and (in my opinion) general happiness is the accumulation of many days of contentment with one’s circumstances.  Therefore, being happier isn’t necessarily a matter of making massive changes in your life.  In fact, it’s often more about minor adjustments.  Here are eight small things you can do so that you feel better about yourself at the end of the day.

    Advertising

    1. Cut the Fat

    Where you can, eliminate parties from your work who don’t really need to be involved.  The more cooks, the less likelihood there is that anything delicious will be made in the kitchen, and this inevitably leads to frustration.  Instead of spending every day in consensus-building meetings, strive to gain greater control over your work responsibilities  – consulting managers or mentors when YOU feel it will be helpful.

    2. Set an Aggressive Deadline

    Most people work more efficiently under pressure, and short-term deadlines ensure that you will actually have something tangible accomplished at the end of each day.  It’s better than spending chunks of time surfing the web, which may feel good in the moment but won’t put a smile on your face on the train ride home.

    Advertising

    3. Jot Down Your Accomplishments

    Meeting several tough deadlines in a row, and achieving quantifiable results while you’re at it, is something of which to be proud.  Don’t sweep it under the rug.  Keep a running list of what you’ve achieved this week and look at it frequently, especially every time your thinking turns dark (e.g. “I’m wasting my life”, “I’ll never get promoted”).

    4. Have a Focused Conversation

    No matter how busy you are, make an effort to stop multi-tasking so that you can spend a few quality minutes with the people who matter.  This means actively listening, contributing as appropriate, and ignoring potential interruptions.  When all of your attention is on the discussion at hand, it’s much easier to build relationships, collaborate effectively and resolve conflicts.

    Advertising

    5. Help a Colleague

    One of the most attractive aspects of volunteerism is that it helps the giver feel good about herself in addition to providing a service to society.  A non-profit related activity will obviously fit the bill in terms of increasing your positivity each day, but you can achieve the same effect by going out of your way to assist a colleague who is struggling.  You might take a project off his plate, show him how to use a new application, or offer to run his broken smartphone to the repair shop while out to lunch.

    6. Walk Outside

    Our energy peaks and flags at different times of the day depending on our natural body rhythms.  When you feel like you need a boost, grab your jacket and take a walk around the building or block.  Not only will the fresh air perk up your mood, but it will also remind you that you live in a world that extends beyond the sterile office environment.  And getting exercise, even when it’s of the light variety, will improve your overall health and well-being.

    Advertising

    7. Eat a Colorful Plate

    Many of us make the mistake of thinking that we’ll be more productive if we forego lunch and eat a candy bar at our desks, but this is not the case.  Skipping meals regularly leads to increased fatigue and depression, and decreased mental acuity.   You’ll feel so much better when 6PM arrives if you stop, go down to the cafeteria, and eat a hearty lunch comprised of at least two-thirds fruits and vegetables.  As a general rule, the more colorful your plate is, the more nutritious.

    8. Don’t Compromise Your Values

    Don’t let anyone, senior executives or otherwise, talk you into doing something you feel is morally wrong.  You may get caught or you may not, but committing ethical violations is a fast way to destroy your sense of self-worth.  Tell the person asking that you don’t feel comfortable in an assertive but non-judgmental tone.  If you are pressed or the situation becomes otherwise intolerable, consider speaking to your HR representative.

    (Photo credit: Time Card via Shutterstock)

    More by this author

    How to Cope with Rejection at Work Do You Unnecessarily Point Out Flaws? 5 Keys to Building Networks Over Time Is Flex-tirement the New Retirement? Does the Y Chromosome Inspire Confidence?

    Trending in Productivity

    1 How to Increase Willpower and Be Mentally Tough 2 How to Influence People and Make Them Feel Good 3 How to Be a Good Leader and Lead Effectively in Any Situation 4 Does the Pomodoro Technique Work for Your Productivity? 5 A Stress-Free Way To Prioritizing Tasks And Ending Busyness

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on March 23, 2021

    Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

    Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

    One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

    The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

    You need more than time management. You need energy management

    1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

    How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

    Advertising

    I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

    I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

    2. Determine your “peak hours”

    Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

    Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

    Advertising

    My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

    In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

    Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

    3. Block those high-energy hours

    Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

    Advertising

    Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

    If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

    That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

    There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

    Advertising

    Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

    Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

    Read Next