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4 Simple Methods to Promote Productivity With Your PC

4 Simple Methods to Promote Productivity With Your PC

We live in a time that demands the ability to multitask, but not many of us are capable of doing so efficiently, especially when it comes to running a business from home or online. One of the biggest problems I once faced was not being able to keep everything in order and running proficiently, which is what inspired me to write an article to share with you 4 simple methods of improving your productivity:

Online and Offline Storage

You never have to face the predicament of not being able to access your most important files again. It’s best to compose your work on your PC and have a copy stored there, but also keep a copy online with cloud storage such as Dropbox or Google Docs. If there ever is a time in which you’re out or on vacation, you still have access to your most valuable files easily. You could work on the go and still have all the updated work synchronised with the stuff on your PC at home.

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Scheduling and Planning                        

Regardless of what your intentions are for using your PC, professionally or socially, you have complete access to plan and have a schedule set up. It’s fairly easy to lose track of time when you’re either hard at work or at play, but all the available software makes it absolutely easy to be reminded that you have other appointments and tasks to get to. Aside from being caught up using your computer, other things like family responsibilities or household chores keep a person busy and with so much going on, even the best multi-tasker may need the odd reminder of tasks and plans pending.

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Lifestyle and DIY pickups

When speaking about productivity, we’re not just talking about being able to do a lot in a day, but also being able to learn new things that promote productivity. Lifehack is packed with articles that literally teach you things that can make life so much easier and make you more self-efficient. You don’t need to look up massive books in the library or invest your money in products when all you need to do is get on your PC and browse through hundreds of articles just waiting to be read.

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Ebooks, Software and Learning New Trades

If you don’t have internet really available, that’s okay—you have countless ebooks that could be purchased with your mobile phone; a lot of them are even free, and with them you can learn amazing stuff to promote productivity when using your PC. For instance, if I wanted to do a side gig to earn extra cash and I felt like I had a good eye for design, I could get ebooks that teach me design principles instead of actually going out and spending money I don’t have. I get to use software that speeds up my process, and on top of that I get to learn a new trade that could earn me money. That is productivity right there and you’re getting all of this done with your PC. PC Clean Up to Assist You Of course, there are some things to be kept aware of: Your pc could easily get swamped with content, and before you know it, you’re searching aimlessly through a ton of folders and documents. If that’s the case, I recommend you use a scheduled pc clean up software to aid a balanced, clutter-free and clean set up for yourself to speed up your PC significantly. Free PC Cleanups Scheduler  – CNET Download(Windows)

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Last Updated on May 22, 2019

The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

If you spend any time at all researching life hacks, you’ve probably heard of the famous Pomodoro Technique.

Created in the 1980s by Francesco Cirillo, the Pomodoro Technique is one of the more popular time management life hacks used today. But this method isn’t for everyone, and for every person who is a passionate adherent of the system, there is another person who is critical of the results.

Is the Pomodoro Technique right for you? It’s a matter of personal preference. But if you are curious about the benefits of using the technique, this article will break down the basic information you will need to decide if this technique is worth trying out.

What is the Pomodoro Technique?

The Pomodoro Technique is a time management philosophy that aims to provide the user with maximum focus and creative freshness, thereby allowing them to complete projects faster with less mental fatigue.

The process is simple:

For every project throughout the day, you budget your time into short increments and take breaks periodically.

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You work for 25 minutes, then take break for five minutes.

Each 25-minute work period is called a “pomodoro”, named after the Italian word for tomato. Francesco Cirillo used a kitchen timer shaped like a tomato as his personal timer, and thus the method’s name.

After four “pomodoros” have passed, (100 minutes of work time with 15 minutes of break time) you then take a 15-20 minute break.

Every time you finish a pomodoro, you mark your progress with an “X”, and note the number of times you had the impulse to procrastinate or switch gears to work on another task for each 25-minute chunk of time.

How the Pomodoro Technique boosts your productivity

Frequent breaks keep your mind fresh and focused. According to the official Pomodoro website, the system is easy to use and you will see results very quickly:

“You will probably begin to notice a difference in your work or study process within a day or two. True mastery of the technique takes from seven to twenty days of constant use.”

If you have a large and varied to-do list, using the Pomodoro Technique can help you crank through projects faster by forcing you to adhere to strict timing.

Watching the timer wind down can spur you to wrap up your current task more quickly, and spreading a task over two or three pomodoros can keep you from getting frustrated.

The constant timing of your activities makes you more accountable for your tasks and minimizes the time you spend procrastinating.

You’ll grow to “respect the tomato”, and that can help you to better handle your workload.

Successful people who love it

Steven Sande of The Unofficial Apple Weblog is a fan of the system, and has compiled a great list of Apple-compatible Pomodoro tools.

Before he started using the technique, he said,

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“Sometimes I couldn’t figure out how to organize a single day in my calendar, simply because I would jump around to all sorts of projects and never get even one of them accomplished.”

Another proponent of the Pomodoro Technique is Sue Shellenbarger of the Wall Street Journal. Shellenbarger tried out this system along with several other similar methods for time management, and said,

“It eased my anxiety over the passing of time and also made me more efficient; refreshed by breaks, for example, I halved the total time required to fact-check a column.”

Any cons for the Pomodoro Technique?

Despite the number of Pomodoro-heads out there, the system isn’t without its critics. Colin T. Miller, a Yahoo! employee and blogger, tried using the Pomodoro Technique and had some issues:[1]

“Pomodoros are an all or nothing affair. Either you work for 25 minutes straight to mark your X or you don’t complete a pomodoro. Since marking that X is the measurable sign of progress, you start to shy away from engaging in an activity if it won’t result in an X. For instance…meetings get in the way of pomodoros. Say I have a meeting set for 4:30pm. It is currently 4:10pm, meaning I only have 20 minutes between now and the meeting…In these instances I tend to not start a pomodoro because I won’t have enough time to complete it anyway.”

Another critic is Mario Fusco, who argues that the Pomodoro Technique is…well…sort of ridiculous:[2]

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“Aren’t we really able to keep ourselves concentrated without a timer ticketing on our desk?… Have you ever seen a civil engineer using a timer to keep his concentration while working on his projects?… I think that, like any other serious professional, I can stay concentrated on what I am doing for hours… Bring back your timer to your kitchen and start working in a more professional and effective way.”

Conclusion

One of the best things about the Pomodoro Technique is that it’s free. Yeah, you can fork over some bills to get a tomato-shaped timer if you want… or you can use any timer program on your computer or phone. So even if you try it and hate it, you haven’t lost any cash.

The process isn’t ideal for every person, or in any line of work. But if you need a systematic way to tackle your daily to-do list, the Pomodoro Technique may fit your needs.

If you want to learn more about the Pomodoro Technique, check out this article: How to Make the Pomodoro Technique More Productive

Reference

[1] Aspirations of a Software Developer: A Month of the Pomodoro Technique
[2] InfoQ: A Critique of the Pomodoro Technique

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