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10 Weird Traits Successful People Have That You Probably Share

10 Weird Traits Successful People Have That You Probably Share

Are you weird?

Has your life deviated from the 9-to-5, married-with-two-kids-and-a-picket-fence norm? Never quite fit in with the “popular crowd” at school? Been known to bend a rule or break an occasional law here and there? (I promise not to tell. Shhhhh…)

If so, you have a lot in common with some of the most successful people on Earth. Here’s what I mean:

1. They were over 40 when they figured it out.

Colonel Sanders was 65 years old when he started Kentucky Fried Chicken. Grandma Moses had never picked up a paint brush until she was in her 80’s. And of course Ronald Reagan was just shy of 70 when he was elected President.

Your weird trait: You don’t believe that life ends just because you have a few gray hairs.

2. They are or were musicians.

Spending hours in a basement or practice room playing scales instead of swilling beer and watching TV isn’t exactly normal behavior. But musicians are pretty common among the successful, whether they’re classically trained pianists like Condoleeza Rice or play in a rock band like venture capitalist Roger McNamees.

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Your weird traits: You know when to start, when to stop, and how your “voice” fits in with the whole.

3. They are or were athletes.

Let’s face it, voluntarily making yourself huff and puff, day after day, year after year, rain, shine, or snow is kinda strange. I’ll bet you can’t remember the last time part of you wasn’t sore. George S. Patton – credited with taking Hitler down in World War II – was a pentathlete.

Your weird traits: You don’t give up until you’ve achieved what you want, and you know that pain is part of the process. You’re also a hella team player.

4. They were inspired by the darndest thing.

James Cameron used to drive a truck for a living. His movies have now grossed more than $2 billion. What inspired him to change careers? Watching Star Wars. Now, that’s weird!

Your weird trait: You are creative, and can find inspiration in the strangest places.

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5. They were homeless.

Halle Berry briefly stayed at a homeless shelter in Chicago while pursuing her career as an actress. Here’s what she said about her experience: “It taught me how to take care of myself and that I could live through any situation, even if it meant going to a shelter for a small stint, or living within my means, which were meager. I became a person who knows that I will always make my own way.”

Your weird trait: You know that you can survive, with or without a paycheck.

6. They weren’t always very well-behaved.

Mechanical genius Soichiro Honda acted more like an American than a nice, team-playing Japanese businessman. As a result, he managed to piss off his peers and get turned down for a job with Toyota. However, he ended up leading the Japanese car revolution.

Your weird trait: You don’t particularly care about other peoples’ opinions.

7. They were high school dropouts.

Richard Branson, CEO of Virgin, dropped out of high school at the age of 16 and is now worth $4.6 billion. Other dropouts include Kirk Kerkorian (8th grade, now worth $3.3 billion), Quentin Tarantino (age 15, two Academy Awards), and George Foreman (age 15, now in the World and International Boxing Halls of Fame).

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Your weird trait: You don’t necessarily fit in the box of formal education and are willing to forego it if it’s distracting you from what you really want to do.

8. They chose wisely.

“A young Lyndon Banes Johnson turned down a lucrative oil investment because he knew, down the road, that being allied with oil companies could hurt his chance at sitting in the Oval Office.”

https://theweek.com/article/index/254361/what-very-successful-people-have-in-common

Your weird trait: You delay gratification, look ahead, and keep your short-term decisions in line with your long-term dreams.

9. They were addicts.

Elton John struggled with alcoholism, drug abuse, suicide attempts, and eating disorders during his self-termed “lost years”. He has now been clean since 1990. Other former addicts include Robert Downey, Jr., Jamie Lee Curtis, and Jordan Belfort.

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Your weird traits: You don’t believe that your current situation is permanent. You embrace the pain needed to change, and you don’t let the past get you down.

10. They had desire.

Nelson Mandela allowed the plight of the black people in South Africa to create in him a burning desire for their freedom, and nothing could stop him.

Your weird trait: You allow the negative experiences in your life to create a burning desire to make things better.

A Final Thought:

If you haven’t succeeded yet, it might be because you keep trying to “fit in”. Embrace your weirdness! Step into the flow of your life, and allow your passion to carry you toward success instead of trying to do it the way you’re “supposed to”.

“To be normal is the ideal aim of the unsuccessful” ~ Carl Jung

Featured photo credit: Psychedelicological III / Derrick Tyson via flickr.com

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Last Updated on November 18, 2019

How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

Everyone of my team members has a bucketload of tasks that they need to deal with every working day. On top of that, most of their tasks are either creativity tasks or problem solving tasks.

Despite having loads of tasks to handle, our team is able to stay creative and work towards our goals consistently.

How do we manage that?

I’m going to reveal to you how I helped my team get more things done in less time through the power of correct prioritization. A few minutes spent reading this article could literally save you thousands of hours over the long term. So, let’s get started with my method on how to prioritize:

The Scales Method – a productivity method I created several years ago.

How to Prioritize with the Scales Method

    One of our new editors came to me the other day and told me how she was struggling to keep up with the many tasks she needed to handle and the deadlines she constantly needed to stick to.

    At the end of each day, she felt like she had done a lot of things but often failed to come up with creative ideas and to get articles successfully published. From what she told me, it was obvious that she felt overwhelmed and was growing increasingly frustrated about failing to achieve her targets despite putting in extra hours most days.

    After she listened to my advice – and I introduced her to the Scales Method – she immediately experienced a dramatic rise in productivity, which looked like this:

    • She could produce three times more creative ideas for blog articles
    • She could publish all her articles on time
    • And she could finish all her work on time every day (no more overtime!)

    Curious to find out how she did it? Read on for the step-by-step guide:

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    1. Set Aside 10 Minutes for Planning

    When it comes to tackling productivity issues, it makes sense to plan before taking action. However, don’t become so involved in planning that you become trapped in it and never move beyond first base.

    My recommendation is to give yourself a specific time period for planning – but keep it short. Ideally, 10 or 15 minutes. This should be adequate to think about your plan.

    Use this time to:

    • Look at the big picture.
    • Think about the current goal and target that you need/want to achieve.
    • Lay out all the tasks you need to do.

    2. Align Your Tasks with Your Goal

    This is the core component that makes the Scales Method effective.

    It works like this:

    Take a look at all the tasks you’re doing, and review the importance of each of them. Specifically, measure a task’s importance by its cost and benefit.

    By cost, I am referring to the effort needed per task (including time, money and other resources). The benefit is how closely the task can contribute to your goal.

      To make this easier for you, I’ve listed below four combinations that will enable you to quickly and easily determine the priority of each of your tasks:

      Low Cost + High Benefit

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      Do these tasks first because they’re the simple ones to complete, yet help you get closer to your goal.

      Approving artwork created for a sales brochure would likely fit this category. You could easily decide on whether you liked the artwork/layout, but your decision to approve would trigger the production of the leaflet and the subsequent sales benefits of sending it out to potential customers.

      High Cost + High Benefit

      Break the high cost task down into smaller ones. In other words, break the big task into mini ones that take less than an hour to complete. And then re-evaluate these small tasks and set their correct priority level.

      Imagine if you were asked to write a product launch plan for a new diary-free protein powder supplement. Instead of trying to write the plan in one sitting – aim to write the different sections at different times (e.g., spend 30 minutes writing the introduction, one hour writing the body text, and 30 minutes writing the conclusion).

      Low Cost + Low Benefit

      This combination should be your lowest priority. Either give yourself 10-15 minutes to handle this task, or put these kind of tasks in between valuable tasks as a useful break.

      These are probably necessary tasks (e.g., routine tasks like checking emails) but they don’t contribute much towards reaching your desired goal. Keep them way down your priority list.

      High Cost + Low Benefit

      Review if these tasks are really necessary. Think of ways to reduce the cost if you decide that the completion of the task is required.

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      For instance, can any tools or systems help to speed up doing the task? In this category, you’re likely to find things like checking and updating sales contacts spreadsheets. This can be a fiddly and time-consuming thing to do without making mistakes. However, there are plenty of apps out there they can make this process instant and seamless.

      Now, coming back to the editor who I referred to earlier, let’s take a look at her typical daily task list:

        After listening to my advice, she broke down the High cost+ High benefit task into smaller ones. Her tasks then looked like this (in order of priority):

          And for the task about promoting articles to different platforms, after reviewing its benefits, we decided to focus on the most effective platform only – thereby significantly lowering the associated time cost.

          Bonus Tip: Tackling Tasks with Deadlines

          Once you’ve evaluated your tasks, you’ll know the importance of each of them. This will immediately give you a crystal-clear picture on which tasks would help you to achieve more (in terms of achieving your goals). Sometimes, however, you won’t be able to decide every task’s priority because there’ll be deadlines set by external parties such as managers and agencies.

          What to do in these cases?

          Well, I suggest that after considering the importance and values of your current tasks, align the list with the deadlines and adjust the priorities accordingly.

          For example, let’s dip into the editor’s world again.

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          Some of the articles she edited needed to be published by specific dates. The Scales Method allows for this, and in this case, her amended task list would look something like this:

            Hopefully, you can now see how easy it is to evaluate the importance of tasks and how to order them in lists of priority.

            The Scales Method Is Different from Anything Else You’ve Tried

            By adopting the Scales Method, you’ll begin to correctly prioritize your work, and most importantly – boost your productivity by up to 10 times!

            And unlike other methods that don’t really explain how to decide the importance of a task, my method will help you break down each of your tasks into two parts: cost and benefits. My method will also help you to take follow-up action based on different cost and benefits combinations.

            Start right now by spending 10 minutes to evaluate your common daily tasks and how they align with your goal(s). Once you have this information, it’ll be super-easy to put your tasks into a priority list. All that remains, is that you kick off your next working day by following your new list.

            Trust me, once you begin using the Scales Method – you’ll never want to go back to your old ways of working.

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            Featured photo credit: Vector Stock via vectorstock.com

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