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10 More Insanely Awesome Inspirational Manifestos

10 More Insanely Awesome Inspirational Manifestos


    There’s nothing like a manifesto that gets the blood pumping, the ideas flowing and a person moving. I offered up several insanely awesome inspirational manifestos not too long ago, and I’ve scoured the Internet looking for more of them that can inspire people with different lifestyles and “workstyles” that they can relate to.

    Whether you’re a creative, an entrepreneur, an artist, a writer, or simply want to live a better life , here are 10 more insanely awesome inspirational manifestos for you to ponder…and perhaps live by:

    1. Austin Kleon – Steal Like an Artist

    Austin Kleon’s latest book offers 10 fantastic ideas that are spread throughout its pages. Steal Like an Artist is a tremendous read and a worthwhile addition to more than just a creative artist’s bookshelf. After all, it does hit the mark on what it says it is: A manifesto for creativity in the digital age.

      (Poster by Austin Kleon)

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      2. Todd Henry – A Manifesto for Accidental Creatives

      If you’re looking to be brilliant at a moment’s notice, Todd Henry’s Accidental Creative manifesto is a great place to start. It’s up to you, of course, to finish.

      3. Bre Pettis – The Cult of Done Manifesto

      So much of what we have to do slips through the cracks for a bit — or even altogether. Bre Pettis assembled this fine manifesto that accentuates the importance of done and sets you on the path to get there.

        (Poster by Joshua Rothaas)

        4. Joel Runyon – Impossible: The Manifesto

        Nothing is impossible for Joel Runyon, a fellow World Domination Summit attendee and leader of The Impossible League. Think something’s not possible for you? Give this a read and then ask yourself that question again.

        5. Gretchen Rubin – The Happiness Manifesto

        The author of the wildly popular book “The Happiness Project” shares her ideas on how happiness can permeate every aspect of your life.

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          6. Clay Collins – The Alternative Productivity Manifesto

          I’ve been a follower of Clay’s work for some time, and this manifesto certainly resonated with me. I’m sure that plenty of our Lifehack readers can relate.

          7. Hugh MacLeod – How to be Creative

          The man who has tons of “Evil Plans” and suggests that we “Ignore Everybody” spells it out for anyone who wants to be creative but is stuck, well…not being creative.

            Click on the image to check out the PDF

            8. Ira Glass – Nobody Tells This to Beginners

            The host of This American Life offers some sage advice to beginners. Brilliant stuff.

              (Poster via ArtistMotherTeacher.com)

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              9. Seth Godin – Stop Stealing Dreams

              Here’s what the author says about this piece:

              “In this 30,000 word manifesto, I imagine a different set of goals and start (I hope) a discussion about how we can reach them. One thing is certain: if we keep doing what we’ve been doing, we’re going to keep getting what we’ve been getting.

              Our kids are too important to sacrifice to the status quo.”

              Well worth the read.

              10. JetSetCitizen Manifesto

              Finally, here’s one that fits the bill that my last post on manifestos served to inspire.

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                The JetSetCitizen Manifesto, the brainchild of John Bardos (a fellow Canadian, no less), is summarized by its creator as follows:

                “A meaningful life does not come from crossing off items from a bucket list, getting stoned on exotic beaches, or getting stamps in your passport. Personal excellence is reflected in all the little decisions you make in your life everyday.”

                Indeed, John. Indeed.

                (Photo credit: Concept of Problem Solving on Blackboard via Shutterstock)

                More by this author

                Mike Vardy

                A productivity specialist who shows you how to define your day, funnel your focus, and make every moment matter.

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                Last Updated on May 24, 2019

                How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

                How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

                If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

                Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

                1. Create a Good Morning Routine

                One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

                CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

                You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

                If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

                The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

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                2. Prioritize

                Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

                Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

                  If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

                  Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

                  How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

                  3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

                  One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

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                  Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

                  Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

                  Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

                  And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

                  4. Take Breaks

                  Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

                  To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

                  After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

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                  I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

                  5. Manage Your Time Effectively

                  A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

                  How do you know when exactly you have free time?

                  By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

                  With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

                  Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

                  A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

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                  20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

                  6. Celebrate and Reflect

                  No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

                  Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

                  Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

                  More Articles About Daily Productivity

                  Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

                  Reference

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