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If You Don’t Do These 12 Money-Savvy Moves Now, You’ll Regret 30 Years Later

If You Don’t Do These 12 Money-Savvy Moves Now, You’ll Regret 30 Years Later

No matter how big the income you get from your job or business, if you don’t know how to manage finances, you will never be able to move from point A to point B. Point A is where you are, money-wise, and point B is where you want to be. Before leaving your 30s behind, you should have mastered this bit of money wisdom.

Just to add more to your financial education, here are twelve moves you can do to take care of your treasure house.

1. Save while you can. When parenting necessities and mortgage costs rise, it will be hard to save money. You want to maximize the opportunities you presently have to stash away some cash, even little by little, so when the economically slow years will say hello, you won’t say mea culpa.

2. Plan for long term goals and identify your priorities. Now that your earning power is at its prime, grab the opportunity to plan on buying a house (that’s if you still haven’t), or think about how to implement college savings plan. When you start to have more expenses due to additional parental responsibilities such as the birth of another baby, school-related expenses for your children, or due to a bigger budget for a bigger car, etc., you’ll have lesser capability to put your plans into work.

3. Start a home business. As early as now, try to learn some new skills you can offer as a service and turn it into a business. You can also use part of what you have saved to start a business you can run from home. No, you don’t need to give up your job, not just yet. You need to grow it first and when it reaches a stage when it starts earning even more than what your getting as an employee, that’s the time you can think of slowly leaving work behind.

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Or better yet, start saving buffer cash, so when you finally resign from your job, you have money to spend while building up your baby startup. A business, something you are qualified to operate, is one of the best investments you can have, and a money-savvy move you can’t miss. Just make sure of 2 things: One, you are confident you can manage the line of business you’re planning to put up (because you’ve thoroughly studied it). Two, you’re passionate about the business.

4. Create wise and solid money habits. It’s high time to develop money habits that will help you weather financial storms for the rest of your life. Kerry Hannon, a personal finance expert who wrote “Great Jobs for Everyone 50+,” says that in her 30s, she used up all available credit on her retirement savings accounts and even saved a part of her extra income from freelancing for retirement. She told us, those funds have served her well over the past years as reserved funds to help pay for vacations, emergencies, and more. She says, she still saves apart from retirement accounts scrupulously in her 50s, too. She’s proud to say, it’s a habit she started way back in her 30s.

5. Prepare for contingencies. It’s always wise to prepare for any eventuality. The worse that can happen to you at this time and era is to have a financial bankruptcy. Now, to avoid this you can prepare for one. The thing is, if you prepare, you will have a bigger chance of not having one. Nice paradox, right? Well I think this is the coolest realization for today. But, how do you prepare for one? There are three essential ways: by saving, by educating yourself, and by investing. Saving is self explanatory, but what I meant by educating yourself is reading books, magazines, attending seminars/workshops and talking to mentors about finances. Heck, we take time and make efforts to learn to drive, why not spend time learning how to manage our finances!

6. Want to leave a job? Roll over your retirement. Most people change jobs in their 30s several times, seeking the right spot where to grow and elevate their value for future career moves. However, this can lead to a patchwork of 401(k) plans at a number of past employers. A wiser move is to re-invest them into an IRA or into your next job’s 401(k), tax-free.

7. Save for retirement. The best time to save for retirement is now that you are young and capable. If you start saving when you’re nearing retirement age, that will decrease your chances of accumulating enough funds to have a comfortable life in your twilight years.

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Recently, I read a book about financial planning by Francis Colayco, and I find it full of tips on how to retire with a bank full of cash. In a TV interview, he was asked why some high-income workers find it difficult to save money for retirement. Mr. Francis Colayco explains: “The biggest mistake people with money can make is premature acquisition of assets. They have enough for a down payment, they make the purchase. When asked how they will pay the amortization, they answer, ‘I’ll find a way.’ You can’t think like that, because the agreement you’ve entered into is an obligation that you have to pay whether or not you’ve made any profits. If you have no guarantee that you can pay, don’t make the investment, even if you have enough for the down payment.”

These unwise purchases will hinder you from saving for your future.

8. Get comfortable with negotiation. Learn and start to negotiate for higher salaries. A 52 year old certified financial planner who hails from Park City, Utah, Nancy L. Anderson, says while she has done many financially wise things in her 30s like saving enough college funds for her child, investing in rental property, buying a house, and setting aside 20% of her income, she realized she should have been bolder and asserted her right to get a higher salary. She said “If I’d negotiated a higher salary each time I changed companies in my career, I’d be wealthier today.” Most people move to other jobs approximately 11 times in their lifetime, negotiating for a better salary in those transitions could have accumulated me around $600,000,” she added.

9. Scope out cash for a down payment – prepare for a down payment for your first house. Even if retirement accounts are almost sacred, and many believe it’s not a wise decision to touch them, some financial planners consider it fair to use them as down payment for your first home.

You must justify this strategy by making sure you have enough time to replenish the accounts before retirement. In case you’re 45 or older, better not consider this idea. You must also be strategic with what account to tap. With a 401k, for example, you will incur a 10% penalty on early withdrawals and taxes. With an IRA, the U.S. government waives 10% of penalty on a distribution of even up to $10,000 for people buying a home for the first time. Despite this, you will still pay taxes on the withdrawal. The main point is, in your 30s you must find a way to make a down payment for your first home and look for ways to have enough consistent flow of income to pay for the amortizations. 

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10. Talk about money with your partner. If you’re married, working together with your spouse to be on track regarding finances and settling any disputes early on can prevent conflicts in the future. “People often comingle finances with their partner, and open communication is key. Make sure you talk about your finances and life goals with your partner, and align on how you will get there together,” Suzanna de Baca, Vice President of Wealth Strategies at Ameriprise Financial, suggests.

11. Set a goal for college savings. I know it’s a tough game. You are funding your retirement, and you are also demanded to plan and prepare for your kid’s college expenses. However, you can be practical by aiming to go to a public school for three years and two years at a private school and think of a way to pay the rest using current income. It will also help to have your student assist you in the expenses by encouraging him to take summer jobs. Use the college-cost calculator at Savingforcollege.com to manage scenarios like these. Sandy Block and Jane Bennett Clark, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine say, “To meet 50% of the total cost of four years at a public university, based on the current average annual cost ($17,131) and a 6% inflation rate for college costs, you’d need to save $222 a month for 18 years, assuming a 7% annual after-tax return on your college savings fund. If you covered half of only the tuition bill, you’d need to save $107 a month.”

12. Two salaries equals more taxes  It’s common, couples most often don’t realize one essential thing: they are taxed as a single entity. It’s true, the so-called “marriage penalty” has been diminished by legislation in the past recent years, so the obvious and easy way to reduce liability is for the husband and wife or both earners to save funds into tax-deferred accounts–IRA or 401(k).

Sources:

Business Insider.com, KIMBERLY PALMERU.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT

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Financial Plan About.com,  

Money MSN.com, Sandy Block and Jane Bennett Clark, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine

Forbes.com, Mitch Tuchman, Contributor

Featured photo credit: *money explore*/John via flickr.com

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Anthony Dejolde

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Published on November 5, 2020

8 Best Finance Apps For Effective Budget Tracking And Planning

8 Best Finance Apps For Effective Budget Tracking And Planning

Looking for ways to effectively track, plan, and manage your budgeting? Well, there is a multitude of apps for that! Finance apps are the best options around for tracking and planning your budget and keeping you accountable. After all, using a pen and paper can make it cumbersome to track.

The apps that we’ve listed below do a ton of the heavy lifting for you and provide a wide array of functions to help you with your financial needs.

How to Pick a Suitable Finance App

When looking at some of the best finance apps that are ideal for budgeting, we found these particular features to be important. Keep these in mind when looking for ideal finance apps.

  • User interface – Navigation is key in any circumstances of an app. This is especially true for helpful apps like finance apps. You want to be using them regularly. As such, the interface should be simple to navigate.
  • Habit building – Finance tracking is all about building money habits, and apps have unique ways of building those habits. There is the app itself but features like push notifications are also essential in some circumstances.
  • Syncing – You should be able to connect your bank account to these finance apps, and that process should also be pretty easy to do, too.
  • Usefulness – The number of features that the app has should be relevant and make it something you want to check. Sure, some of these finance apps work in the background, but those on this list help significantly when you check them regularly.
  • Data presentation – The number of reports and analytical data is a core focus for these finance apps as well since it allows you to make sound financial decisions.

1. Best Finance App Overall – Mint

    If you’re looking for an overall quality finance app, Mint is the first that comes to mind. It’s one of the most well-known personal finance apps around and for good reason. It provides you with a complete financial picture all in one place.

    By connecting your debit and credit cards to your account, Mint will provide you with a list of transactions and break them into categories, showing you exactly where you are spending your money. You can also track billing and create a budget on the app to help you stay on track of your savings goals.

    A new feature that Mint rolled out recently is the ability to see your credit score. Through this feature, you can also see the factors that are contributing to your credit score. Beyond that, you can also track investments and schedule routine utility payments.

    Download Mint here.

    2. Best Finance App for Debt Management – YNAB

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      You Need A Budget (YNAB) is an app that is built on four rules:

      1. Give every dollar a job.
      2. Embrace true expenses.
      3. Roll with the punches.
      4. Age your money.

      Based on these four rules, the app will help you build a better budget while also allowing you to gain control of your spending. You can import transactions from your checking account and apply them to each budget category to get an accurate look at your spending.

      This app also provides detailed reports to show you your spending habits while you are striving to keep a balanced budget in the various categories. YNAB will also point out other spots that you can improve your spending.

      According to YNAB, the average user will save about $600 in the first two months and can save over $6,000 in the first year. It sounds promising for a debt management app.

      Download You Need A Budget here.

      3. Best Wealth Management App – Personal Capital

        Another solid choice is Personal Capital. It focuses on wealth management but also serves as another personal finance app. Through this app, you can manage assets and investments along with setting up a budget for everyday spending accounts.

        This service integrates with over 14,000 financial institutions, allowing you to link your bank account(s) directly to the app and through it. By linking your bank account to the app, you can track your spending, too.

        That said, the app really shines when you connect it to your investing accounts. By doing so, you have a convenient spot to track your portfolio by account, asset class, or individual security. The app can also show you opportunities to diversify, manage risk, and find any hidden fees that you could be paying.

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        You can also compare your own portfolio to the major market benchmarks to help you keep track of whether you’re on track to reaching your goals. You can also get financial advice from this app as the financial advisors here are registered and can provide you with advice tailored to your goals.

        Download Personal Capital here.

        4. Manage Your Subscriptions – Clarity Money

          One of the popular business models that companies are moving to these days is subscription-based. While this model does have its merits, one of the many problems that we face with this model as consumers is that we find ourselves subscribed to things we don’t need. Paying for a streaming service is nice, but many people often are subscribed to multiple streaming services.

          Because it’s so difficult to remember and even track all the subscriptions we’re paying for, this particular app can provide us with clarity. Clarity Money is all about bringing to light what you are paying for and providing you with a convenient way to cancel and throw away unused subscriptions you’re not using.

          Beyond removing unnecessary subscriptions, the app also looks at your spending behavior and offers suggestions for ways to improve your financial health. You can even make deposits to your savings account through this app.

          Download Clarity Money here.

          5. Best Bill Paying App – Prism

            If you’re looking for a convenient app that shows all of your bills and financial apps, this is the app for you. Prism takes pride in having 11,000 billers on this app. This is the highest amount of billers on bill-paying apps you can find. From billers like large banks to even small utility companies, chances are high that the company you’re paying for accepts this app.

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            In terms of actual function, you can add your bills to the app and the app will then automatically track it. It’ll send you date reminders to pay the bill as well so you won’t get hit with late payments. On top of that, you can schedule payments to be made the same day or several days in advance as well. Prism is a nice app that allows you to pay bills in one sitting without having to log in to several accounts.

            Download Prism here.

            6. Best Shared Expenses Management App – Spendee

              Many of these apps are focused on providing services to a single user. This is natural considering most of these apps are asking for your banking information. However, this is one of the few apps on here that allows multiple people to use it.

              With Spendee, the idea is to create shared wallets with your friends and family that you can then use to manage shared expenses for a household budget. You will need to get bank transactions for this to work, but that is fine. After that, the app will categorize all of the transactions and tally how you’re spending money every month.

              You’ll be able to add cash expenses manually as well for accuracy. Beyond those features, you’ve got bill tracker functionality to ensure you pay your bills and avoid late payments. There is also a budget component that will allow you to save and ensure you don’t overspend.

              Download Spendee here.

              7. Best Visuals on Finance App – Mobills

                Mobills is another bill management app that offers a great presentation of information. The app focuses on bill management and offers typical features you can find in these apps. These include categorizing your bills, paying them through the app, and setting up budgets to ensure you stick to them.

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                That being said, Mobills delivers these features remarkably. It presents you with charts that are completely interactive and can help you analyze your financial life. Also, moving bills to various categories is easy and smooth to do.

                Download Mobills here.

                8. Best Finance App for Budgeting Overall – EveryDollar

                  Dave Ramsey is a personal finance expert who urged people to follow a zero-based budget method. This method is the idea that every dollar serves a purpose in your budget. It’s this concept that has inspired the name of this app: EveryDollar.

                  With that in mind, the app provides a monthly expense tracker that you can connect your bank account to. This will take note of important transactions to ensure your spending is in check. You can even split expenses between multiple budget items. The tracker also provides you with an overview of how much money you’ve spent this month and what you’ve got left.

                  Staying true to the name, EveryDollar also has a money management aspect that will help you set up a money management plan. You’ve got access to money management experts who will guide you through financial planning.

                  Download EveryDollar here.

                  Final Thoughts

                  Many financial apps are available to help you achieve your financial goals. Each app has its own perks and benefits to consider. The nice thing about many of the apps on this list is that they have free trials that allow you to get a good feel of them before fully getting them.

                  More Finance Apps

                  Featured photo credit: Austin Distel via unsplash.com

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