Advertising
Advertising

These 10 Things Will Happen After You Lend Money To Friends

These 10 Things Will Happen After You Lend Money To Friends

If a friend comes to you for help, lending money seems like a sensible option at first. That’s especially true if it’s someone very close to you who you think would never let you down. But, even though there are some upsides to lending money, it’s hard to justify the risks. Here are ten things that will happen when you lend money to friends.

1. Your friend will appreciate you.

It’s always nice to feel appreciated and, especially at first, your friend will be grateful to you for lending the money to them. It gets trickier when it’s time for them to pay you back, but at first it can make your relationship stronger.

Advertising

2. You’ll feel good about yourself.

A selfless act like lending money to your friend is sure to give you some warm fuzzy feelings. It’s nice to be able to help out someone close to you, and the satisfaction of doing a good deed is often worth the sacrifice.

3. You don’t earn any interest on the loan.

Let’s consider reasons why lending money might not be good idea. One less-than-selfless reason is that whereas at a bank you accrue interest on your money, when lending money to a friend the value of it decreases over time due to inflation. That means even when you’re paid back in full you’re still in the red.

Advertising

4. You might want the money.

We all want nice things. Chances are, you’ll be able to buy less nice things after lending money to a friend. This is less than ideal, though hardly enough of a reason not to be lending money to someone. The reasons that follow, though, will make a much more convincing case.

5. You might need the money.

Fortunes can turn very easily. Yours might if something unexpected happens like a medical issue or the loss of a job. At that point, you might really need the money you loaned your friend in order to support yourself and your family. But, even if your friend is now in a better place financially than you are at that moment, there’s no guarantee that you’ll be you’ll get your money back when you need it.

Advertising

6. The due date tends to shift.

This is if you have a due date at all. If you ignore this advice and lend money, at least set a due date. But even if you do, the problem remains that your friend will feel less pressured to pay you back because of your prior relationship. That’s natural; your friend might not realize how big of a deal returning the money is to you. They feel like they’re waiting to do it when it’s convenient for them. Heads up: it will never be convenient for them to return a significant sum of money.

7. Your friend is more likely to ask for a loan again, or a loan from others.

A lot of the time lending money just encourages people to rely more on others than they did before. That’s not their fault; it’s very easy to becoming dependent on others instead of shouldering all the burden yourself. If your friend does fall into this all-too-easy bad habit, they might even ask you for another loan. If you don’t grant it, they’ll move on to others who might.

Advertising

8. It’s a hard subject to bring up.

It’s uncomfortable enough for a creditor to call someone up and request payments, it’s another thing entirely to broach the subject if someone close to you isn’t showing any inclination that they’re going to pay you back anytime soon. That money might create a wedge between the two of you. That’s why lending money leads to further problems than just a hit to your checking account.

9. It can ruin your relationship.

This is one of the most significant risks of lending money to friends. If your friend can’t pay you back or, especially, if they won’t pay you back, you’ll start to resent them. Even if you don’t think you will, you will. That resentfulness isn’t worth it when there are likely other ways you can have their back.

10. You can help your friend in other ways.

Lending money isn’t the only way to solve someone’s problem. In fact, throwing money at a problem can oftentimes (though not always) be the most shallow way to take care of it. To pull out an oft-quoted metaphor, don’t give your friend a fish. Teach them how to fish for themselves. With your professional and personal help they might be able to benefit in ways like landing a better job or developing healthier spending and saving habits. There are definitely some dire situations when lending money to friends is the best choice (such as if you’re in debt to a loan shark), but if lending money can be avoided, you should steer clear.

Featured photo credit: Money Wallet/401(K) 2012 via flickr.com

More by this author

Matt OKeefe

Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

15 Productive Things to Do When Bored (So Time Is Not Wasted) The 10 Best Online Dictionaries 15 Easy Ways For Everyone To Make Money With Social Media 7 Ways To Give Great Feedback This Is What The Cozy Home Designed By 2000 People Looks Like

Trending in Money

1 How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years 2 Top 5 Spending Tracker Apps to Manage Your Budget Smart in 2019 3 How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt 4 How to Use Debt Snowball to Get out from a Financial Avalanche 5 How Personal Finance Software Helps You Get More Out of Your Money

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on April 3, 2019

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

1. Consider Consolidating Multiple Credit Cards If Possible

This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

Advertising

Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

2. Try to Pay the Full Balance You Spent Each Month at the Very Least

You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

3. Pay Extra When You Can – Every Small Amount Counts

This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

Advertising

It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

4. Create a Plan on How to Pay Extra

Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

5. Cut out Costs for Services You Do Not Use

If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

Advertising

6. Get Aggressive About It

Consider these points:

Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

7. Reevaluate Your Progress at Set Intervals

Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

Advertising

Finally (and most importantly)…

8. Keep Trying

Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

Start Knocking out Your Debt Today

The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

More Resources About Better Money Management

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Read Next