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Know How To Manage Your Money: 10 Personal Finance Books You Need To Read

Know How To Manage Your Money: 10 Personal Finance Books You Need To Read

Managing your money is one of the most important things you can do. It doesn’t matter if you’re personally wealthy and trying to figure out how to invest or flat broke living paycheck to paycheck. Proper management techniques can save you money, make you money, and keep things in order. Here are some personal finance books that can help you do just that.

1. The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas J Stanley, Ph.D.

personal finance books

    First up is a delightful read called The Millionaire Next Door by Dr. Thomas J Stanely. This is a great book for people in their 20’s. It takes years of research and boils it down in solid, easy-to-understand rules that people can use to manage their finances and become more financially stable. Some of the lessons are pretty well known such as “spend less than you make.” It’s a great read and definitely worth your time.

    2. The Investment Answer by Gordon Murray and Daniel C. Goldie

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    personal finance books

      For young people, reading about finance is boring. I’m writing this article and even I shudder at the thought of learning about it. It’s complex and full of rules, regulations, risks, and rewards. The Investment Answer comes recommended by Business Insider as very approachable and easy to understand which makes it great for investment beginners. That said, it may be a bit weak for those who are already familiar with investments.

      3. Why Didn’t They Teach Me This in School? by Cary Siegel

      personal finance books

        As the name implies, this book is about all of the basic personal finance lessons that they probably should’ve taught us in school and didn’t. There are 99 tips, tricks, and lessons for personal finance that pretty much everyone should know and reviewers have called it a “great gift idea for high school and college graduates.” We happen to agree.

        4. The Money Book for the Young, Fabulous, and Broke by Suze Orman

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        personal finance books

          Being broke can be a horrible thing. You have rising debt, you’re stuck in a hole, and you don’t know what to do. This book can help you figure out what to do. It doesn’t matter if it’s credit card debt, student loans, or some other financial malady, Suze Orman has advice to help you get rid of it for good.

          5. Secrets of the Millionaire Mind by T. Hary Eker

          personal finance books

            In this book, you’ll learn exactly what separates rich people from everyone else on a subconscious level. According to Eker, millionaires are millionaires because of how they approach money, and it has little (if anything) to do with skill, talent, or knowledge in their business. It’s an interesting read and one that may help you change your tune financially.

            6. How to Retire Happy, Wild, and Free by Ernie J Zelinski

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            personal finance books

              Why do we work? So we can take care of ourselves. However, the second reason we work is so that one day, we don’t have to work anymore. In this book. Zelinski not only shows you how to retire well financially but also how you can enjoy life even if you don’t retire with a million bucks. It’s lighthearted, fun, and for people of all ages.

              7. I Will Teach You To Be Rich by Ramit Sethi

              personal finance books

                If you’re looking for something less philosophical and more direct, this is a great book to read. Here you’ll find a six week course that’ll help you set your financial life straight. It’s not an end-all-be-all solution but after the six weeks you should be on a much better track financially. It’s very highly rated on Amazon and word is that it’s also humorous and personable which is a change of pace for personal finance.

                8. Your Money: The Missing Manual by J.D. Roth

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                personal finance books

                  J.D. Roth is truly an inspiration when it comes to personal finance. He started out dirt poor, did the research, and found out the missing links that was preventing him from being successful. He started a blog and eventually wrote this book. If you’re not doing well financially and want to turn it around, this is a great place to start.

                  9. Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

                  Personal Finance books

                    The first thing you should know about Daniel Kahneman is that he’s so good at economics, they gave him a Nobel Prize for it. That means his opinion is probably one that should be respected. In this book, Kahneman explores the way we think about money and has determined that we either make decisions quickly or slowly. He explains the pros and cons of each and when we should use each one to make financial decisions. It’s a little complex but it’s definitely worth a read.

                    10. You’re So Money: Live Rich, Even When You’re Not by Farnoosh Torabi

                    personal finance books

                      Last on our list is a book that shows you how to have fun even when you don’t make enough money to have fun. This book is a great way to get the things that you want without going broke or going into debt. It preaches making sacrifices in some areas so you can have fun for others. One cited example is taking out your significant other on an expensive date, but eating PB&J for several days to make up for it. If you want nice things but don’t make that kind of money, check this book out.

                      Featured photo credit: Swingers via groupthink.jezebel.com

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                      Joseph Hindy

                      A writer, editor, and YouTuber who likes to share about technology and lifestyle tips.

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                      Last Updated on March 4, 2019

                      How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

                      How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

                      Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

                      I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

                      Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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                      Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

                      Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

                      Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

                      I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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                      I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

                      If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

                      Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

                      The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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                      Using Credit Cards with Rewards

                      Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

                      You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

                      I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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                      So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

                      What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

                      Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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