Advertising

How to Travel the World on a College Budget

Advertising
How to Travel the World on a College Budget

Traveling is a great way to keep yourself going during the hard grueling semester’s work. But having the money to finance your travelling desires is truly the only thing in your way from dropping everything and leaving! Here are a list of very helpful, uncommon tips that will help you get away much faster on a college budget.

Ways to fund travel

Credit Cards

Using credit cards to travel overseas can be very risky; especially if you do not have the means and a solid plan to pay back the expenses that you will incur. The good thing about using a credit card to help you travel overseas is that some of them (please do your research before applying to any credit card company) come with currency exchange, so when you arrive in a new country it will exchange your currency for you rather than you having to go through the trouble of doing it yourself. You can also go to a neighboring country that uses the same currency, but has a better exchange rate, so you get more of their money for less of yours (keep that in mind)!

When using a credit card to travel out of the country, make sure that it can be used worldwide (check with the issuer). You could also look into a student credit card, which sometimes have better benefits for college students.

Just keep in mind that being irresponsible with credit cards will put you further into debt than the student loans you might be using for your education.

Advertising

Being financially literate will help you save money

Check with your bank to see what the ATM fees and debit/credit card usage policies are overseas. This way you’ll know exactly what you’re getting into and won’t feel blindsided if you come home owing a lot more money than you originally anticipated. Look into as many possible avenues as you can in regards to worldwide credit cards, student credit cards (that can be used worldwide), and programs such as the two below that can help you save money.

International Student Identity Card (ISIC)

The ISIC gives you access to student discounts on flights, museums, and attractions. You can save much more money by investing in this card rather than not. It doesn’t make anything free for you, but it does make certain things more affordable with the discounts that it gives you access to. You can visit their website for further information.

World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF)

By becoming a part of WWOOF you’ll have access to jobs across the world, and will be accommodated on your journey to a certain extent. For all intents and purposes, at least WWOOF provides a place for you to stay. It is essentially like volunteer work. You do not get paid to help on the farm, but room and board are provided. Each membership costs $30 USD per year and needs to be renewed annually. You can read more from their FAQ at their website.

Where Should You Stay?

Hostel instead of a Hotel

Hostels are much cheaper and they can be found in various locations. There are hostels outside of the cities you’re visiting so it’s more cost-efficient, and hostels that are within the city limits which rival hotels. Most hotels are inside city limits and the prices are higher because of that reason. The important things to remember with hostels are as follows:

Advertising

  • Hostels may charge for using their laptops/tablets/computers–so make sure you bring your own.
  • Drinks are cheaper at your own hostel
  • Use services like www.hostelworld.com or www.hostelbookers.com to find your hostel destination.
  • Never tell your hostel when you’ll be arriving. If you arrive late they will give up your room and you won’t be able to get your deposit returned to you.
  • Always bring a padlock (or two).

Getting There: Planes, Trains, and Automobiles

How to get there is important, every bit as important as keeping money in your wallet. Stay frugal, open-minded and choose your means wisely. Search for flights on lesser-known airlines. When you get to your destination, say if you’re going to a place such as Europe with a great train system, take the trains.

What to do when you get there

Follow the Deals

When you’re traveling with only your college budget in mind and not so much your destination, it makes it easier to stick to following the deals.

Your best bet is to schedule your trips outside of major tourists’ months, when the prices drop. If you get off the main streets and avoid the major attractions, you’re sure to find cheaper prices and more of an authentic “local” experience.

Buy food in bulk and cook for yourself, if possible

This will lower the expenses on buying food at restaurants by a great deal! If you’re staying at a hostel, most of them provide kitchens for this reason alone.

Advertising

Talk on FaceTime and stay on Wi-Fi instead of using your minutes overseas

Overseas plans for each carrier are different, so you definitely want to check with your phone provider before leaving the country. Otherwise you may come home to a bunch of phone bills you weren’t expecting.

Search local tipping laws before you hand out extra cash to your bartender/waiter

It’s commonplace here in the states to tip a minimum of 15%, but that same rule doesn’t apply in most places overseas. As long as you look it up and find out for certain, you won’t feel bad leaving without tipping at all or as much as you normally would.

Look for free opportunities

Instead of looking for that club to go out to, or spending money at museums or galleries, you can save yourself money by going swimming in the ocean for free, read a book on a beach for free, or find the parks in the area and spend your day there. You can also hide away in a historic library

Packing: How to cut down on cost

Packing light is your best bet. You can avoid fees for extra bags this way and, if you’re backpacking, you won’t kill yourself with all the additional, unnecessary baggage.

Advertising

Packing light is also beneficial because you’ll be able to chase down and catch that bus rather than stand around waiting for a taxi. Pack lightweight, wrinkle-free or wash-and-wear pants, shirts, and travel jackets so that you can roll them up and save space. If you’re going for studies overseas then don’t take the hardcover books, find the paperback or electronic version.

Staying for an extended period of time?

Find local work to help immerse yourself in the culture and earn some extra money. If you go WWOOFing then you won’t be paid for working on the farm, but you may have access to other working opportunities in the area. If you do both you’ll get the exposure to two different working lifestyles overseas, additional language exposure, and you’ll have an asset that’ll help you stay financially afloat while you’re there.

Getting around overseas

You are better off renting a bike than paying for a tour

You can lose yourself in the city and learn so much more about it rather than having to pay out of pocket to be guided around to all of the major sights to see.

Be sure that you’re using public transportation instead of taxis

Taxis are great conveniences and luxuries at times, but the wallet doesn’t like them that much. Public transportation is pretty well developed in the other countries, especially Europe, the UK and major Asian countries.

Advertising

More by this author

Jessica Millis

An experienced writer, editor and educator who shares about tips on effective learning.

10 Effective Ways To Make You a Fast Learner universities in europe 25 Best Universities in Europe You’ll Be Interested in Studying In How to Prepare For College Final Exams Using the Internet 20 Not-So-Popular Websites Students Should Visit to Make Studying Easier An Incredibly Helpful List of 71 Free Online Courses and Tutorials

Trending in Money

1 5 Most Affordable Australian Cities For Students 2 10 Amazing Places You Can Afford To Retire Abroad 3 33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now 4 How To Achieve Financial Freedom With the Right Mindset 5 Financial Freedom is Not a Fantasy: 9 Secrets to Get You There

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Most Affordable Australian Cities For Students

Advertising
5 Most Affordable Australian Cities For Students

With high standards of education, a multicultural community, and laid-back lifestyle, it’s not hard to see why so many students love Australia. However, one thing Australia is also known for is being the world’s most expensive country to study in as a foreign student.

For those willing to look beyond popular cities like Sydney or Melbourne, however, study abroad doesn’t have to be unaffordable. Check out these five more economical cities that still make for great student living.

1. Gold Coast

If you’re looking for a more affordable place to buckle down and study while still enjoying glorious beaches and a vibrant nightlife, the Gold Coast is an excellent choice. While it has no shortage of restaurants, cafes, bars, and natural attractions, the city is also well-known for its quality of education.

Gold Coast is home to Bond University, which has Australia’s highest rating for overall graduate satisfaction, but also some of the country’s highest tuition fees. Fortunately, it hosts campuses for Griffith University and South Cross University as well, both of which have affordable options for international students.

Advertising

When it comes to off-campus accommodation, there are plenty of choices, from shared housing to homestays. Real estate sites like Flatmates can be useful for finding options within your budget.

2. Wollongong

Wollongong’s close proximity to Sydney (80 km) makes it a popular choice for students who can’t afford the high cost of living in Australia’s largest city, but still want to experience all that it has to offer. Wollongong itself is a lively city as well, and is rated as the country’s most livable small city thanks to its gorgeous beaches and lively city centre.

The University of Wollongong is one of Australia’s top universities, with a comprehensive academic program, international research reputation, and high graduate employment rates.

Due to a lack of on-campus parking, most students prefer to walk, cycle, or use the free bus service that operates between the university and city centre. Living costs are quite reasonable in Wollongong, and sites like Gumtree can come in handy if you’re looking to split housing costs or even score some second-hand furniture on arrival.

Advertising

3. Hobart

Hobart is the capital of Tasmania, the second oldest city in Australia, and also the cheapest city for university students to live in. While it might not be as happening as cities like Gold Coast or Brisbane, its striking natural beauty and slower pace of life make it a great place to block out distractions and focus on studying.

The Hobart Universities sector is based on a single institution, the University of Tasmania, which is consistently rated among the top ten universities in Australia and has a large population of students from abroad, with more than one in five students being international.

Although public transport in Hobart isn’t as convenient as could be, there is plenty of student accommodation available to make up for it. Students often live in shared houses near the university so they can simply walk to class. If you’re looking to rent a shared house or room in the area, Easy Roommate can be a good place to start your search.

4. Adelaide

Of Australia’s major cities, Adelaide is the cheapest to live in. That, along with its spacious layout, clean and green atmosphere, and beachside attractions make it a great place to live and study. It’s also regarded as the food and wine capital of Australia.

Advertising

Adelaide has three universities, including the University of Adelaide, which is ranked in the top 1% of universities worldwide; the University of South Australia; and Flinders University. Its integrated bus, train, and tram transportation system connect all parts of the city and make it easy for students to get around.

Naturally, the cost of accommodation is lower outside the city centre, and depending on which university you’re studying with, the outer suburbs could be more convenient as well. Check Study Adelaide for information on a range of student accommodation options, from independent living to homestays.

5.  Brisbane

Brisbane is the capital of Queensland and Australia’s third largest city. Unlike Sydney and Melbourne, it’s known for being one of the most affordable cities in Australia, which makes it a good choice for students. It’s also known for its pleasant subtropical climate and wide range of entertainment options.

Brisbane has three major universities: the Queensland University of Technology, the University of Queensland, and Griffith University (which accepts the most study abroad undergraduates). The inner city is well-connected by public transportation, although cycling is popular as well, and there are plenty of cycle paths that make it easy for students to get around this way.

Advertising

Students typically live in and around the inner suburbs, where the bulk of Brisbane’s teaching facilities are located. If you’re looking for convenient accommodation off-campus, you can check sites like Urbanest or The Pad.

Featured photo credit: Bhavesh Patel via unsplash.com

Read Next