Advertising
Advertising

Get Rich(er)

Get Rich(er)

Get Rich(er)

    It is true that no one can serve two masters, and slavish devotion to unrighteous mammon is indeed a road to misery.  Ambition to produce and “be rich” is not necessarily a bad thing, though.  And if you’re reading this, you’re likely among the richest 1-2% of people who have ever lived.  Historically speaking, you’re not just rich.  You’re super-rich.

    Advertising

    This means a couple of things.  First, it means that foregoing generations have left us with the capital, technology, and institutions we need to produce staggering amounts of wealth (which isn’t just “stuff;” wealth is whatever people value).  They have done this by establishing legal systems conducive to trade, by establishing an ethic of inquiry, and by refraining from consumption so as to leave us with plenty of resources that we can use to produce current and future output.  How, then, in this environment, should one grow wealthy?  And what are the social implications?  Here, I will relay some of the best advice I have gotten and discuss some of the social implicaitons of “getting rich.”  First, here’s how to do it:

    1.  Stop renting and buy a house. Homeowners build equity while renters line their landlords’ pockets.  This require a few important caveats.  First, don’t buy a house you can’t afford by agreeing to terms you can’t meet embedded in a mortgage you don’t understand.  Second, it is better to rent than to buy if you are only going to be somewhere for a very short period of time.  We bought our first house about a year ago, and we bought conservatively: we bought in a nice, semi-urban neighborhood based on the assumption that we would have to pay for the house on a single income.  We’re happy, we’re building equity, and we aren’t over-extended (yet–we have a six-week-old!!).

    Advertising

    2.  Step away from the latte. The Automatic Millionaire author David Bach refers to what he calls “the latte factor,” which consists of the money we spend on small, incidental purchases: a $3 latte here, a $15 lunch there.  It all adds up.  Of course, there is something to be said for having your morning coffee, and for some of us, it is more efficient to get our fix from Starbucks.  A first step might be to size down–Starbucks does sell a “short,” though it isn’t on the menu–or to go with a regular coffee that costs $2 rather than a $4-5 specialty drink.

    3.  If you’re being paid $50,000, do $55,000 worth of work. One of the best ways to ensure job security is not to do the bare minimum necessary to get by, but to do enough that you are competitive for another job.  In academia, our brass ring is tenure, which gives us wide-ranging freedom to explore the world of ideas.  Last summer, I heard it put this way: “don’t worry about being competitive for tenure.  Worry about staying marketable.”  If you’re marketable–and you may be perfectly content wherever you are–then you shouldn’t have to worry too much about job security.

    Advertising

    4.  Save. If you aren’t contributing to your 401k or your 403b and you don’t have an excellent reason not to (we didn’t during my first year at Rhodes because we were saving cash to buy a house), you’re throwing money away.  A Roth IRA is a fantastic deal if you’re young, and a 401k can reduce your tax liability considerably while giving you room to grow your capital in the future.

    5.  Bank the raises. What do you do with those little boosts to your income?  Do they go straight down the drain on a bunch of stuff you don’t need?  Or do you put them in the bank?  We have a system that has worked reasonably well in our house.  Whenever, we get unexpected shocks to our income, we split it four ways.  The bank gets 25%, the kids get 25%, my wife gets 25%, and I get 25%.  This has proven to be a somewhat reasonable and easy way to splurge every so often while making sure that we are wise stewards of what has been entrusted to us.

    Advertising

    6.  Be a cheapskate. This is something we have some trouble with.  When your income goes up, it’s fine to splurge a little.  My wife and I both have iPods, and we have a nice TV.  However, we had one car for our first four years of marriage, and we bought a deeply-used second car last summer from a Rhodes graduate who was advertising it on Craigslist.  We’ve never had cable, we just switched from cable internet to AT&T (slightly slower, much cheaper), and we try to take advantage of cheap entertainment (our church library, for example, has a ton of stuff).

    7.  Go with equities if you’re young. The younger you are, the better it is to invest in stocks because you have plenty of time to take higher volatility in exchange for higher returns.  As you get older, you will want to make your portfolio more conservative, but now is the time to take on risk.  Even in the current crisis, there is reason for optimism because it’s a great time to buy.  After you’ve salted away two or three months’ income in order to deal with unanticipated emergencies–like the new kitchen floor we had to get last month–you should begin investing in equity-heavy mutual funds.  Many companies offer funds that rebalance toward greater conservatism over time, substituting bonds and safer securities as you approach retirement.

    8.  Get educated. The market is screaming “stay in school!”  Wages for low-skilled occupations have stayed flat while wages for high-skill, high-tech occupations have risen dramatically.  If you’re serious about it, college is a great investment.  Strange as it may sound, the increasing cost of college is another reason to be optimistic.  Higher costs for higher education suggest increasing productivity in other sectors as well as general expectations that there are great opportunities in the future for the educated.

    9.  Be generous. Finally, it is important to remember all the cliches about wealth.  All that glitters is not gold.  George Bailey was the richest man in Bedford Falls.  It doesn’t profit a man to gain the world and yet lose his soul.  Ebenezer Scrooge, for all his wealth (which produced higher incomes for many people, by the way), appears to have had a miserable and wretched life.  Money cannot buy happiness or love, but it can buy a lot of things that contribute to happiness–such as the ability to help people who truly need it.

    More by this author

    21st Century Opportunities Learning from A Master: Review of “Bear Bryant, CEO” On “The Substance of Style” Productivity Hints from Booker T. Washington Get Rich(er)

    Trending in Money

    1 5 Books You Must Read if You Want to Be a Millionaire in Your 20’s 2 50 Businesses You Can Start In Your Spare Time 3 The Average Retirement Savings and How to Save Wisely 4 7 Sell Your Stuff Apps That Will Get You Some Extra Cash in Hand 5 How to Invest for Retirement (The Smart and Stress-Free Way)

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on June 25, 2019

    5 Books You Must Read if You Want to Be a Millionaire in Your 20’s

    5 Books You Must Read if You Want to Be a Millionaire in Your 20’s

    Millionaires and billionaires read more than you think. In fact, the likes of Warren Buffet are said to read 1.000 pages a day. As the old saying goes “There’s no smoke without fire”; so, start off with these 5 incredible books!

    1. The 48 Laws of Power

    48-laws-of-power

      “If you are unsure of a course of action, do not attempt it. Your doubts and hesitations will infect your execution. Timidity is dangerous: Better to enter with boldness. Any mistakes you commit through audacity are easily corrected with more audacity. Everyone admires the bold; no one honors the timid.”

      On your journey to becoming a millionaire in your 20’s, there will be many people trying to manipulate you into doing what they want. This international bestseller by Robert Greene is the widely read by those in the entertainment industry because of its dog-eat-dog environment. This book is a must-read for anybody who wants to claim power and keep it. it’s a fun read that tells the story of some of the most powerful people in history.

      Advertising

      An example of a law of power is: Always say less than necessary.

      • When trying to impress, the more you say the more common you look and less in control.
      • Be vague.
      • Powerful people impress and intimidate by saying less.

      2. Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion

      influence-the-psychology-of-persuasion

        “Often we don’t realize that our attitude toward something has been influenced by the number of times we have been exposed to it in the past.”

        This book explains the core strategies people use to influence others using real world examples. Robert Cialdini’s book goes over human quirks like the need to be consistent, and how you can use that in your marketing strategy to make more money. “People’s ability to understand the factors that affect their behaviour is surprisingly poor,” Cialdini says, “which leads to people making poor decisions without realising why.”

        Advertising

        Cialdini includes real world examples of why people join cults, buy certain jewellery, or give to charity.

        3. Blue Ocean Strategy

        blue-ocean-strategy

          “Value innovation is the cornerstone of blue ocean strategy. We call it value innovation because instead of focusing on beating the competition, you focus on making the competition irrelevant by creating a leap in value for buyers and your company, thereby opening up new and uncontested market space. Value innovation places equal emphasis on value.”

          This book argues that leading companies don’t succeed by battling competitors in “Red Oceans”, but by creating “Blue Oceans” where they have uncontested market space to grow. It goes over case studies like “Cirque Du Soleil” who created a blue ocean by creating a circus platform that didn’t include animals or more than one act on at once but instead, decided to focus on talented performers and music who created a mystical storyline.

          Advertising

          4. The Fountainhead

          the-fountainhead

            “A man’s spirit is himself. That entity which is his consciousness. To think, to feel, to judge, to act are functions of the ego.”

            The Fountainhead takes place in the United States, mostly in New York City, during the 1920s and 1930s. Billionaire Mark Cuban named his yacht “Fountainhead” after this book. This classic novel is about the struggles of an innovative architect named Howard Roark and his effort to achieve success on his own terms. Many entrepreneurs are inspired by this book because it depicts how you should be uncompromising when it comes to your vision and your goals. If you follow this way of life, you develop the ability to change the world and creating something unique.

            5. The Compound Effect

            Advertising

            the-compound-effect

              “Do you know how the casinos make so much money in Vegas? Because they track every table, every winner, every hour. Why do Olympic trainers get paid top dollar? Because they track every workout, every calorie, and every micronutrient for their athletes. All winners are trackers.”

              This book is by Darren Hardy the CEO of Success Magazine, he goes over how it’s the small, seemingly insignificant choices that compound to create success or failure over time. No one has a plan to be broke and fat but that’s what happens when you don’t have a plan and go along the path of least resistance. Hardy argues that you cannot improve something until you measure it and to always take 100 percent responsibility for everything that happens to you.

              So, those are five books you must read if you want to give it a try to become a millionaire in your 20’s. What are the best books you have ever read? Leave a comment and share these life-changing books with your friends to help them become successful like you.

              Featured photo credit: Bill Gates Foundation via businessinsider.com

              Read Next