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Can Money Really Reflect The Value Of College Majors?

Can Money Really Reflect The Value Of College Majors?

Starting a college education is an exciting decision that can enrich your life for decades into the future. There are many ways to look at the value of a college education, including money and personal growth. If you are concerned about the years of effort and expenses required to obtain a post-secondary education, give yourself the benefit of reviewing the value of advanced study.

1. Engineering Majors Earn The Highest Incomes

For students who are interested in maximizing their income, engineering is an excellent choice. Engineering majors tend to earn more than many other graduates. In fact, some specialized engineers (e.g. petroleum) have earned +$90,000 salaries upon graduation according to a Wall Street Journal report. For those who enjoy the precision of science, math and engineering, there are many wonderful ways to make an excellent income and make the world a better place.

According to The Hamilton Project, engineering majors tend to earn over $2 million over the course of their careers. In contrast, English Language and Literature majors tend to earn $1 million over the course of their working career.

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Lifetime Earnings By College Major (The Hamilton Project)

    2. Reduced Likelihood of Unemployment

    Unemployment is an unpleasant experience by any measure. Not only do you have the prospect of lost income, but you also have to contend with the unpredictable job search process. The unemployment rate for college graduates in the US peaked at about 4% in 2010 according to a Business Insider report.

    Avoiding the anxiety and discomfort of unemployment is a significant benefit! According to Robert L. Leahy, director of the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy, “Research suggests that being unemployed doubles a person’s chance of a major depressive episode and that unemployment is also highly associated with domestic violence and alcohol abuse.” (source: Unemployment takes tough mental toll, CNN).

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    3. Increased Access To Six Figure Jobs

    Earning a six figure income is one of the rewards available to college graduates. For example, most project managers with six figure salaries have a four year degree. Other highly paid careers such as medicine, law and engineering also require a college education. While there are significant numbers of people earning high incomes without a college degree, it is a much more difficult to earn a high income.

    4. Understanding The World

    For many fields of study- including the liberal arts and social sciences – you gain a much deeper understanding of the world. My university studies focused on history and it enhances every aspect of my life. Whether I’m seeking to understand the latest revolution, the economic forces that influence our choices or the impact that leaders have, history has enriched my life deeply. My knowledge of history also enhances my enjoyment of travel and ability to understand different countries.

    If you are studying the social sciences, humanities or another field that prompts your friends and family to ask “what are you going to do with that?”, don’t worry. Smart motivated people who understand the world usually find good opportunities.

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    5. Improved Critical Thinking Skills

    Improving the quality of your thinking and reasoning skills is one of the greatest benefits you receive in college. In writing an essay, you acquire the habit of evaluating evidence and contributing your perspective. In a science class, you learn how to collect and organize data and other tools of the scientific method. These skills protect you from being taken in by people who play fast and loose with the facts. Developing effective critical thinking skills is a life long activity, get started now with 9 Ways to Train Your Mind to Think Critically.

    6. Prepare For Life As An Active Citizen

    The freedom to vote and participate in politics is a great responsibility. The broad perspective you earn from college studies – especially those in the liberal arts and social sciences – make you into a better citizen. Richard Sigurdson, former Acting Dean of Arts at The University College of the Cariboo, emphasizes the broad social and personal benefits of studying the liberal arts in his essay Why Study Liberal Arts?

    A liberal arts education will enhance your knowledge and improve your understanding of the world and its people. Many say that knowledge leads to wise action, perhaps even to goodness. Thus, an Arts education may help you to perceive and to understand your shortcomings, allowing you to become a better citizen, friend, spouse, parent, human being. Arts courses often enable students to reach beyond their own experiences and imagine worlds far distant in time and space. By opening your eyes, ears and mind, a good Arts education can strengthen in you the virtues of tolerance, sympathy, and respect for others.

    7. College Graduates, Regardless of Major, Earn More Than High School Graduates

    On average, earning a four year college degree significantly increases your income over the course of your life. This finding has been proven again and again by numerous researchers. Additional higher education tends to result in higher incomes. The chart below comes from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics:

    Earnings and unemployment rates by educational attainment, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

      Featured photo credit: Trinity College Dublin/Gigglekid via pixabay.com

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      Bruce Harpham

      Bruce Harpham is a Project Management Professional and Founder and CEO of Project Management Hacks.

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      Last Updated on April 3, 2019

      How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

      How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

      Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

      By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

      This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

      Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

      1. Consider Consolidating Multiple Credit Cards If Possible

      This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

      It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

      Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

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      Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

      My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

      Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

      2. Try to Pay the Full Balance You Spent Each Month at the Very Least

      You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

      Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

      If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

      3. Pay Extra When You Can – Every Small Amount Counts

      This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

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      It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

      4. Create a Plan on How to Pay Extra

      Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

      This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

      For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

      Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

      5. Cut out Costs for Services You Do Not Use

      If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

      In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

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      6. Get Aggressive About It

      Consider these points:

      Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

      Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

      Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

      Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

      7. Reevaluate Your Progress at Set Intervals

      Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

      By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

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      Finally (and most importantly)…

      8. Keep Trying

      Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

      Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

      Start Knocking out Your Debt Today

      The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

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      Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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