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5 Costly Retirement Regrets We Should Avoid

5 Costly Retirement Regrets We Should Avoid

There is much to consider when preparing for retirement. New retirees are always more than eager to share stories, successes and mistakes they have made along the way. If you listen closely, chances are many of them will tell you something they wish they could do over or do different.  Here are 5 costly retirement regrets we should all avoid.

1. Spending too much in your peak years.

When you were young, you wanted the finer things in life; Cars, houses, cloths, boats etc. As you get older, spending too much in your peaks years becomes a retirement mistake.

This is because you lose the power of compound interest. The longer you keep your money invested, the more of it you will get out. Most people in their twenties and thirties unfortunately do not think this way until it is too late.

The best way to avoid this retirement mistake is to first control your spending. Clean up your vision board, you don’t need all those material things to show how successful you are. As Dr Sues once said “Those who matter don’t care, and those who care don’t matter”

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Next, get financially literate. Take some money classes to understand how to build a budget, get out of debt and invest.

Make sure you are also putting some money back in your youth. It may not seem like much right now, but little drops of water make a mighty ocean.

2. Not taking good care of your health and body

Entering into retirement with bad health can have some very costly consequences.  When we are young, we spend so much time working, so much so that health and fitness is often the last thing on the mind. The mistake here is that too often; people pay the cost of their bad food and exercise choices when they have the least amount to spend – retirement.

This retirement mistake will not only have you running out of money too soon into your retirement, it will also rob you of precious time that could have been spent with family.

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The best way to avoid this retirement mistake is to remember that your health is your only true measure of wealth, so take good care of yourself.

Start by making better food choices and also exercising to keep you looking young and vibrant. At retirement, you will probably be paying your own health insurance out of pocket, so it pays to have a solid foundation in health and wellness.

3. Borrowing from yourself

A major mistake people make heading into retirement is borrowing from their retirement accounts to fund large purchases. This could be a second home, a remodel, or a child’s college education. The big mistake here is not only will you have to pay taxes, penalties and fees to get your money out; you may also have to work longer.

The emotional attachment that leads you to justify making these large purchases will cost you big in the long run

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The best way to avoid this money mistake is to remember why you started saving in the first place. These fees are put in place to remind you of the commitment you have made to secure your final future.

Maybe start a fund for whatever project it is you want to accomplish. Set measurable savings goals over a set period of time to meet this financial goal. You may have to get an extra job, however it will be well worth it.

4. Not downsizing soon enough

Life can often feel like one big roller-coaster ride.  We leave the comfort and acreage of our parents homes to the small nest eggs of a bachelors pad or apartment. As we get older and have our own families, we also follow suit and acquire our own large homes to raise our kids in. However this becomes a retirement mistake if you do not know downsize soon and early enough. Whether it’s moving into a smaller home or selling off a second car, don’t forget that you must already be living below your investment income going into retirement. Most folks waiting to cut back at retirement will be drowned out by the cost of downsizing.

The best way to avoid this retirement money mistake is to make sure that you are not blinded by your pride. Do not be given to the temptation of keeping up the perceptions others have of you. At this age you should be travelling and enjoying the world with your spouse much more than you did when you were younger. Chances are you will not need the huge house. Not to mention, you will be paying lower monthly bills.

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5. Not kicking a bad habit early enough

There is a feeling of invincibility we all feel when we are young. We develop vices too often as a means to socialize or pass the time. From alcohol consumption, smoking cigarettes to gambling, most people regrettably count the cost of their vices when it is too late.

While it is OK to indulge yourself in whatever past time you choose, the retirement mistake here is forgetting to count the cost. A regular smoker will very easily spend three thousand dollars a year on cigarettes. This is money that could have been put into a ROTH IRA.

The best way to avoid this mistake is to create an allocation system for yourself or a play fund. This is a reasonable amount of money you have allowed yourself to spend on all vices. Your need to live a comfortable life in retirement must be greater than your need to have too much fun now.

Approaching retirement doesn’t have to be all dark and gloom. Just remember that the choices and decisions you make now will affect the rest of your future.

Featured photo credit: http://theneotericgroup.com/experience/retirement-residences/ via theneotericgroup.com

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Published on October 8, 2018

13 Incredibly Useful Tactics to Help You to Stick to Your Family Budget

13 Incredibly Useful Tactics to Help You to Stick to Your Family Budget

Are you having trouble sticking to a family budget? You aren’t alone.

Budgeting is difficult. Creating one is hard enough, but actually sticking to it is a whole other issue. Things come up. Desires and cravings happen. And the next thing you know, budgets break.

So how can you stick to a family budget? Here are 13 tips to make it easier.

1. Choose a major category each month to attack

As the saying goes, “Rome wasn’t built in a day.” With that in mind, one approach to help you get into the habit of sticking to a budget is simply starting slow.

Spend too much on Starbucks runs, eat out too often, and have an out-of-this-world grocery bill? Choose one bad habit and attack.

By choosing one behavior to focus on, you’ll prevent yourself from being overwhelmed. You’ll also experience small victories, which help you gain positive momentum. This momentum can then carry over into your overall budget.

2. Only make major purchases in the morning

If you’re making large purchases in the evening, there’s a good chance you’re doing so after a long day and you’re probably tired.

Why does this matter? Because our judgement tends to be off when tired – our willpower is compromised.

Instead, only make major purchasing decisions in the morning when you’re energized and refreshed. Your brain will be firing on all cylinders and your resolve will be high. You’re less likely to give in and settle at this point.

3. Don’t go to the grocery store hungry

Have trouble with impulse buys at the grocery store? If so, there’s a good chance you’re going grocery shopping while hungry.

The problem here is that when you’re hungry, everything looks good. So you’re more likely to make split decisions on things that aren’t on your grocery list.

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Instead, make sure you eat prior to your grocery store trip. Then take your list, along with your full stomach, and go shopping. Notice how food doesn’t look quite so good when you’re not fighting cravings.

4. Read one-star reviews for products

Is there a product you just have to have (but maybe not really)? Check out the one-star reviews.

By reading all the horrible reviews, you may be able to basically trick yourself into deciding that the product isn’t worth your time and money.

Next thing you know, you didn’t make the purchase, you saved the money, and you feel good about the decision.

5. Never buy anything you put in an online shopping cart until the next day

If you are making a purchase online, it’s typically a two-step process. First, you click “Add to Cart” and then you go in to review your cart and pay.

The problem is that there not typically much reviewing during step two. It’s generally click pay and there you go. However, this is the perfect point to stop for reflection.

Once you add to your cart, your best bet is to step away until the next day. Let the item sit there and grow cold, so to speak.

This gives you a night to “sleep on it” and decide if you really want and need to spend that money. If you wake up the next day and still find the purchase viable, then perhaps it’s time to go for it.

6. Don’t save your credit card info on any site you shop on

One of the other pitfalls of shopping online is that fact that most sites ask you to save your credit card information.

While the sites will frame it as a method of convenience, the truth is they know you’ll spend more money in the long run if your credit card information is saved.

The “convenience” takes away one last decision-making point in the purchasing process. True, it’s a pain to get out your credit card and enter the information every time. But guess what? That’s the point. If that inconvenience helps you stay on budget, then it’s worth it. Which leads into the next tip.

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7. Tape an “impulse buy” reminder to your credit card

Credit cards make spending much easier than cash. When you spend cash, you can literally see your wallet emptying. A credit card comes out, then goes back in. No harm, no foul.

That’s why it’s a good idea to tape a reminder to your credit card. Customize a message that is something along the lines of “do you really need this?” or “does it fit the budget?”

That way when you pull out the card, you get one last reminder to help you question your decision and stick to your budget.

8. Only use gift cards to shop on Amazon

Amazon is probably the easiest place online to blow money. It’s just so easy to click and buy. However, one way you can slow the process down is buy only using gift cards. Here’s how it works.

If you plan on making a purchase on Amazon, go to the grocery store and purchase a pre-loaded Amazon gift card of the proper amount. There’s no convenience fee, so you literally pay for the money you’ll spend.

Now take that gift card home and load it to your Amazon account. There’s your money to spend.

Why does this help? It makes you have to purposely go to the score and purchase the card in order to purchase the item. That’s a pretty deliberate thing that takes some time, commitment, and thought.

This process will effectively kill the impulse buy.

9. Budget using cash and envelopes

As mentioned earlier, it’s a lot harder to spend cash than swipe a credit card. You can take this even farther by using only cash, and separating that cash by budget category.

Create an envelope for each category and stick the cash in there at the beginning of each month. When the envelope is empty, no more spending on that category, unless you borrow from another (be careful of that approach).

This can be pretty helpful for people that have a hard time following transactions in their checking account, or keeping a budgeting spreadsheet.

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The envelopes simplify the tracking process, leaving no room for error. Nothing hides from you because it’s tangible in the envelopes in front of you.

10. Join a like-minded group

Making the decision to stick to something like budgeting is difficult. It takes long-term commitment.

You’re going to feel weak sometimes. And sometimes you may fail. That said, support from others can help strengthen resolve.

Support can come from a spouse or a friend, but they won’t always have the exact same goal in mind. That’s why it’s a good idea to join a support group that’s likeminded.

No need to pay here, as there are tons of free communities that fit the bill online.

For example, reddit has multiple subreddits that deal with budgeting and frugal living. You can follow, subscribe, and get active in those communities.

This will open your eyes to new tips and strategies, keep your goal fresh on your mind, and help you realize there are others dealing with the same struggles and being successful.

11. Reward Yourself

When you set a budget, it’s usually with a large goal in mind. Maybe you want to be debt free, or perhaps you want to see $10,000 in your savings account.

Whatever the case, the end goal is great, but the end is often far away, making it hard to see the end of the tunnel.

With that in mind, it’s a good idea to set mini-goals along the way. This helps you still look at the big picture but have something that’s attainable in the short-term to help with momentum.

But don’t stop there – set rewards for yourself when you reach that small goal. Maybe it’s an extra meal out. Or a new pair of shoes.

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Whatever the case, this gives you something in the near future to look forward to, which can help with the fatigue that can result in pursuing long-term goals.

12. Take the Buddhist approach

You don’t have to be a Buddhist to recognize some of the wisdom in the teachings. One of the tenets of the philosophy involves accepting that we can’t have everything we want. And that’s okay.

Sometimes you won’t feel good. Sometimes you’ll have cravings. You can’t deny them. But you can recognize them, accept them, and let them pass by. Then you move on.

Apply this to the times you want to do things that will break your budget. You’re going to have the desire to eat out when you shouldn’t. You might want to stay out and spend too much at happy hour with your work friends.

The feelings will come. Recognize them, accept them, but let them go.

13. Set up automatic drafts to savings

If you wait until you’ve spent all your budgeted money to deposit money into savings, guess what? You probably aren’t going to put any money into savings.

It’s too easy to see that as extra money and end up using it to treat yourself.

Instead, set up automatic savings withdrawals. That way, the money is marked and gone before you can even think about it. It becomes a non-issue. It’s no longer “extra.” It’s just savings.

Conclusion

Sticking to a budget can be difficult. No one is denying that.

However, if you can do a few things to set yourself up for success, and put some practices in place to curb impulse buys, then you can (and will!) be successful sticking to your family budget.

Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

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