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12 Ways to Save on Your Food Budget

12 Ways to Save on Your Food Budget

As the cost of living creeps up, more and more people are turning to new ways to balance their budget at home. Food is one of the biggest expenditures for most Americans, and maximizing your opportunities to get the most bang for your buck in that department can lead to more dough in your pocket and your oven. By taking a fresh look at not just what you eat, but how you eat, you can start saving from the start.

1. Start clipping coupons.

If there was ever anything to make you feel more like your grandmother, it’s clipping coupons. However, shows like Extreme Couponing and websites such as Couponing101.com are fueling the fire of consumers looking to save a buck. Be sure to buy your weekly Sunday paper and set aside some time out of your week to go through and clip coupons for things you use. It’s also good to know your local supermarket’s coupon policies, as there may be days or times where they’ll double your coupons. There are also tons of “coupon classes” online, such as the one above, to teach you the basics before you even pick up the scissors.

2. Get digital.

Have a particular item that you use a lot? Get digging online. More and more retailers are using coupons as a way to drive traffic to their websites, social media accounts, and blogs. Digital coupons are also huge with supermarkets, with most of them offering a range that can be clicked online and used in-store with a card or your phone number. Lastly, check with coupon sites online for additional coupons you can easily print from home and use when you hit the shops.

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3. Ask yourself not what you want to eat, but what you can afford to eat.

A common mistake that consumers make is to figure out what they want to eat, rather than thinking about their budget. When you start clipping coupons, try to tailor your weekly menu around what’s on sale. Checking with supermarket flyers and advertisements, as well looking into information on how to create healthy budget meals, is also a great way to start figuring out your weekly menu. Don’t forget to take a look at what you already have in your pantry, refrigerator and freezer, as these items are already paid for and ready to go.

4. Buy in bulk.

Hitting up your local wholesaler may mean you’re lugging huge boxes of pasta out to your car, but it can also mean significant savings. Buying in bulk is nearly always your best bet for saving more money on your food budget. Look for bulk buys on things you regularly use, as they’re less likely to sit around on your shelves and go bad. Great bulk purchases include pantry items, such as canned goods, pastas and grains–all of which can be used to make a quick, healthy and not to mention easy meals.

5. Put your freezer to work.

Your freezer is a great key to saving more money on your food budget. This is particularly true if you’re buying in bulk, as you’ll be able to freeze meats, dairy and produce for use later on down the road. Take some time to learn the best ways to freeze various food items so you’ll know how to maximize your savings, as well as how to prevent freezer burn and food wastage.

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6. When you can, make your own.

Still buying jarred pasta sauces and loaves of bread? Why, when you can make your own more delicious versions for much less? Making your own sauces and food not only means you know exactly what went into them, it’s also generally more healthy as it’s less likely to be packed with additives and preservatives. Cost-wise, it can’t be beat. For example, making your own bread costs, on average, $0.66 per loaf. Compare that to a good quality sandwich bread at $3.99 and there’s really no argument.

7. Pay more attention to leftovers.

Just made a roast chicken for dinner? Now it’s time to throw away that pesky carcass, right? Wrong. Learning to use or repurpose your leftovers to make additional meals is an excellent way to save cash while eating deliciously. Turn leftover meatballs into hero sandwiches, roast bones to make stock, and use those leftover egg whites to make meringues for dessert. The more willing you are to think creatively about your leftovers, the more you’ll get out of them.

8. Kick food waste to the curb.

When it comes to your refrigerator and freezer, your new budget-conscious mantra should be: “No food left behind.” Before you head to the store, see what you still have left to use. You can even make it a challenge to come up with new ways to use those few lonely carrots languishing at the bottom of the vegetable drawer, or what’s going to happen with that sad leftover chicken breast.

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9. Eat seasonally.

Craving a tomato during the winter? That’s going to cost you a bundle. Focusing on seasonal eating means you’re going to chow down on more delicious produce, as well as preventing your pocketbook from taking a beat down. Learn about what’s great in your area and when its at the peak of availability. Not only can you stock up and fill your freezer, but you can do it a lot cheaper.

10. Don’t fear the cheaper cuts.

If you love meat-based dishes but aren’t sure you can afford it, then looking at the less lovely bits can be your ticket to carnivorous nirvana. As the nation’s food budgets become smaller, a new focus on cheaper cuts, such as chicken thighs, beef brisket and even offal, has become the hot new trend in American kitchens. Try focusing on a long, slow cooking with these meats to get the very best out of them. They also tend to freeze beautifully, making them a budget savior.

11. Start living like a veggie.

If you’re already working the vegetarian vibe, then you’re already on the path to saving on your food budget. Ditching meat from your diet, even just a couple of days a week, can offer significant savings to your bank account. Try signing on to the global Meatless Monday Challenge, or simply make a pledge to eat veggie for one meal each day. Not only is it a healthy way to live, you can also save some extra cash effortlessly.

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12. Grow your own.

Love fresh herbs, fruits, and vegetables? Even the tiniest of spaces can help support your food budget. Try growing a kitchen window box with your favorite herbs, planting a small garden in your backyard, or even just trying out a basic outdoor planter with a few carrots, onions and potatoes. You can grow a surprising amount of food, and once you’ve had it freshly picked, it’s difficult to go back to store-bought.

Featured photo credit: cpyles via flickr.com

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Last Updated on April 3, 2019

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

1. Consider Consolidating Multiple Credit Cards If Possible

This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

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Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

2. Try to Pay the Full Balance You Spent Each Month at the Very Least

You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

3. Pay Extra When You Can – Every Small Amount Counts

This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

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It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

4. Create a Plan on How to Pay Extra

Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

5. Cut out Costs for Services You Do Not Use

If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

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6. Get Aggressive About It

Consider these points:

Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

7. Reevaluate Your Progress at Set Intervals

Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

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Finally (and most importantly)…

8. Keep Trying

Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

Start Knocking out Your Debt Today

The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

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Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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