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10 Fuel Efficient Cars in 2013

10 Fuel Efficient Cars in 2013

Fuel is expensive these days. With a shrinking economy and government incentives aplenty, purchasing a fuel efficient car is a necessity in life. Here are 10 fuel efficient cars and other vehicles to look for in 2013:

1. Nissan Leaf

Nissan_Leaf

    106 mpge city, Price: $35,200

    Consumer Reports is calling the Nissan Leaf “excellent.” The older versions still hold up mechanically. Electric hybrids are reaching levels of fuel efficiency never before thought possible. The Leaf has a decent amount of room for road trips. It’s responsive, cheap, and durable

    2. Tesla Model S

    Tesla-Model-S-rear-right-side-view

       

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      90 mpge hwy, Price: $49,900

      Tesla looks good. The Model S is an amazing sedan. There’s no record of reliability yet, and we don’t know whether they’ll be a burnout, but I’d bet money on this car. Even if the company goes under, it’ll remain inexpensive to maintain and parts will be easy to find for a few decades after. This is one of my dream cars.

      3. Ford Focus Electric

      Ford Focus Electric

        110 mpge city, Price: $39,200

        Ford is a company you either love or hate. Most Ford owners stick by them. There’s a reason for that. The Focus is a great car. It’s cheap to keep and retains value decently. With so many Ford Focus Electrics on the road these days, finding cheap parts will never be an issue. This is a great ride for singles, couples, and starter families.

        4. Honda Fit EV

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        Honda Fit EV Lifehack

          132 mpge city, Price: $36,625

          Honda is known for reliability. The mileage and space on the all-electric Fit EV makes it a great traveler for one to two people comfortably. If it breaks, there’s usually a Honda certified mechanic nearby who can fix it fast, and cheap.

          5. Smart fortwo Electric Drive

          Smart_fortwo_front_3jun2006 (1)

            122 mpge city, Price: $25,750

            The fortwo from Smart is exactly that: smart travel for two people and not much else. I wouldn’t use it for long distance travel or camping, but as a city commuter, it’s amazing. Just don’t get hit in one, because you’re a bit smaller than everything else on the road.

            6. Lexus ES

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            2013-Lexus-ES

              40 mpge city, Price: $40,475

              If luxury is what you’re after, Lexus delivers with the ES series. It may not be a full electric, but 40 mpg is a small price to pay for the luxury and comfort a Lexus brings to the table within its ambient lit leather interior.

              7. Ford C-Max Energi

              Ford C Max Energi

                44 mpge city, 41 mpge hwy, Price: $33,745

                This Ford Hybrid isn’t quite as stylish as the Lexus ES, but it has a few comfort features of its own, such as the innovative SmartGauge with EcoGuide in the dash. Park Assist, Post-Crash Alert, and Heated seats make this gadget car worth checking out. 

                8. Toyota Highlander Hybrid

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                Toyota Highlander Hybrid

                  28 mpge, Price: $40,815

                  For certain environments, an SUV is necessary. BP, DHS, and rappers all heart SUV’s. Even if you’re a soccer or LAN mom, the Highlander is a great choice. With a decent factory sound system and plenty of room, the Highlander is your best option for family road trips.

                  9.Vespa GTS 300 ie

                  vespa-946-scooter-12

                    52 mpge, Price: $2,000

                    The Vespa is a stylish choice for coastal areas. You can pull one off in some coastal cities like Miami, LA, NYC, Boston, etc, but Phoenix or El Paso is probably not the place for them. The gas mileage is great, the body trim is stylish. If I were to buy a scooter, I’d buy a Vespa.

                    10. Honda CMX250C Rebel

                    2009-Honda-CMX250CRebel250b

                      95 mpge, Price: $4,300

                      If you want a cruising motorcycle that’ll get you started and last, the Honda Rebel is the bike you want. This baby reaches speeds of 85 mph, and is perfect for starter road trips warriors. If you have an RV, this is a great alternate mode of transportation to carry along with you if you have room.

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                      Published on September 17, 2018

                      How Being Smart With Your Money Leads to Financial Success

                      How Being Smart With Your Money Leads to Financial Success

                      Achieving financial success is not something that just happens. Maybe if you win the lottery or something, but for the average person like you or me, it comes from a series of small steps you take over a long period of time.

                      With each step, you form a new smart money habit. And with each smart money habit, you build towards financial independence.

                      So what sort of habits can you form to get on that path? Let’s take a look at smart money habits you can start today to get you closer to a financially independent future.

                      1. Avoid being “penny wise but pound foolish”

                      It’s tempting to try saving a couple cents here and there when buying small items. However, that’s not where the real money is saved. You’re putting in extra effort for something that doesn’t move the needle.

                      You get the most bang when you’re able to cut down on your bigger bills. For example, finding a lower interest rate for your mortgage could save you $50+ per month. And cutting your transportation bill by purchasing a cheaper car or taking public transportation can provide large gains as well.

                      So, look at your recurring expenses such as housing, transportation, and insurance, and see where there’s wiggle room. It’s a much better use of your time than trying to pinch pennies here and there on smaller purchases.

                      2. When you want something big, wait

                      Impulsivity can get you in trouble in most aspects of life. Finances are no different.

                      It’s human nature to see something and want it right then and there. It starts as a kid in the checkout line at the grocery store, and it continues on through adulthood.

                      We get an idea in our head of something we want, and it’s hard not to go out and get it right then.

                      A good example is wanting a new car. Perhaps you’ve had your car for several years. It’s crossed the 100k mile mark. Maybe maintenance is due, and you’re annoyed that you need to replace the timing belt or purchase new tires.

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                      So, you get the itch.

                      You start digging around online, and you realize you could trade in your current car for something newer and more exciting… all for a few hundred bucks a month. Then you get obsessed.

                      Here’s where you have to take a step back.

                      Your newfound obsession is clouding your judgement. Rather than giving into the impulse, wait it out.

                      Set a timeframe for yourself. Maybe you come back to the decision three months down the road. See if the obsession lasts.

                      It might, but often, a funny thing happens. Often, you forget about it. And often, you find that the new car wasn’t a need at all.

                      The impulse faded. And you just saved yourself a ton of money.

                      3. Live smaller than you can afford

                      You finally get that big raise. And you want to celebrate – and why not?

                      You’ve been looking forward to this forever. And after all, it was all due to your hard work.

                      That’s fine, splurge a little. However, make it a one-time deal and be done.

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                      Don’t get caught in the trap that just because you’re now making more money, you should spend more.

                      Too often, people get more money and feel like they that gives them the means to buy a bigger house, a bigger car… you know the drill. Resist.

                      The fact is that living smaller than what you can afford is one of the fastest ways to build savings.

                      But if you constantly upgrade as you begin to make more, then you’ll never get ahead. You’ll just build up more debt along the way and have just as little wiggle room as before.

                      4. Practice smart grocery shopping

                      Food… it’s one of the biggest portions of any budget. And if you’re not careful, it can be one of the biggest drains on your wallet.

                      But luckily, there are a few things you can do to ensure that you stay smart with your money when buying groceries.

                      Create a grocery budget

                      Set a strict weekly grocery budget. When you know how much you can spend on groceries, you can then plan your weekly menu around it.

                      Once you know what all you need, you can go shopping and keep a running tally as you shop to ensure you’re on track.

                      I tend to do this in my head, rounding for each item. However, writing it down as you go would probably work best for most people.

                      Make a list… and never deviate

                      Never go to the grocery store without a list. If you go to the store with a ballpark idea in mind, you don’t have a true ide of what you need.

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                      You’re not well-researched. You don’t know what the sales are. As a result, you’re going to make decisions on the fly.

                      These impulse decisions will lead to overspending, which will derail your grocery budget.

                      Eat before going grocery shopping

                      It’s also important to eat prior to going to the grocery store. Hunger is a powerful force.

                      If you’re shopping on an empty stomach, everything is going to look good. In particular, you may find a lot of ready-made, processed snacks will look enticing.

                      After all, you’re hungry now and that food is easily available. So subconsciously, you may lean towards those items.

                      Unfortunately, not only are those items typically less healthy, but they’re likely more expensive. You pay for convenience.

                      However, when you eat prior to shopping, then you’ll shop with a clear mind. Your hunger won’t cloud your judgement, influencing you to make poor decisions like a cartoon devil resting on your shoulder whispering in your ear.

                      This makes it much easier to stick to your grocery plan.

                      5. Cancel your gym membership

                      Now that you’re all set on your food, it’s time to get smart about managing your budget in terms of physical fitness. And let’s begin by avoiding the gym. The gym bill, that is.

                      The average gym membership costs around $60 per month. That’s $720 a year.

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                      Yet, two out of three gym memberships go unused. That means two-thirds of people who have a gym membership are literally giving away almost a thousand bucks a year. It’s crazy!

                      I recommend seeking an alternative. One good alternative is to look into fitness streaming services.

                      Streaming services allow you to stream hundreds of workouts like Insanity and p90x, right in your own home for around $10-20 a month. That’s $40-50 less a month than the average gym membership.

                      Of course, then there’s the free option. The internet is full of free workouts that you can do on your own with minimal or no equipment.

                      For example, there’s the Couch to 5K program, that I personally used a decade ago to ease myself from couch potato to running my first 5K race. If I could do it, anyone could.

                      Then there are free resources like reddit that have limitless information on workouts. The Fitness subreddit has done all the research for you, populating workout tips and detailed workout routines for anyone to use in their wiki.

                      There are several routines that require no equipment. And you can join in on the subreddit to become part of the community, making it easier for those seeking comraderie and encouragement in their fitness goals. All for free.

                      It’s baby steps… And baby steps can start now!

                      I’ve never met anyone that can’t stand to be a bit smarter with their money. And on the flip side, anyone can get smarter with their money. But remember, it doesn’t happen all at once.

                      Begin by fighting your impulses. Prepare for the week and be smart at the store. And cut monthly expenses like gym memberships that are overpriced and you probably aren’t getting your money’s worth out of anyway.

                      The devil is in the details. And the details can change your lifestyle and prep you for a financially independent future.

                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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