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Why Fiber is so Important and How to Get Enough

Why Fiber is so Important and How to Get Enough

Fiber is a top priority to health that often gets overlooked. If you want to increase your energy, clear up your skin, and achieve your ideal weight, this article is for you.

A lack of fiber is much too common, and leads to constipation—a top complaint brought to physicians. And, if your body is not detoxifying properly you will feel sluggish, lack energy, have skin flare-ups, and be prone to weight gain.

Did you know that you need 25-35 grams of fiber a day ?

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This can seem like an arduous task if you’re not eating the right foods.

This article will give you an easy blueprint to ensure you get your daily fiber intake in a simple and enjoyable way.

1. Check Food Labels

It is imperative to check your food labels to discover how much fiber is in your food. Often people make poor food choices simply due to lack of awareness of the nutritional contents. Luckily, by law, all foods must be labeled, so you can empower your food choices by becoming aware of how much fiber is in the food you eat.  Check bread, rice, pasta, and all grain-products for fiber content per serving. You want to choose grains that have a minimum of 3 grams of fiber per serving, though it is often easy to find high fiber products with 5 grams per serving or more. Anything less and you know you are eating something stripped of its original nutrients. This is why white-flour based foods have no fiber, and these are the foods associated with weight gain. You need fiber to feel full and to promote healthy bowel movements. If you eat carbohydrates void of fiber, you will not feel as full as you would if the food did have fiber. Food void of fiber can lead to overeating and weight gain. Don’t let this happen to you—make an informed choice by reading labels, and choosing high fiber foods all of the time.

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2. Add Raw Fruit

Fruit is a great wholesome source of fiber and every fruit has roughly 3 grams of fiber. Aim for 3 servings of fruit a day.

3. Add Beans as a Diet Staple

Eating a diet rich in beans is imperative to receiving an adequate amount of daily fiber. One cup of beans has 15 grams of fiber! I suggest adding beans to your salads, or you can get creative with beans by turning them into a bean-burger or blending beans to make a dip such as hummus. Beans are one of the healthiest and easiest way to ensure you reach 25 grams of fiber a day.

4. Eat Your Veggies

Vegetables are also high in fiber and should be a priority to your daily diet. I recommend consuming 3-4 cups of greens a day. An easy way to do this is to make a green smoothie by blending about 2 cups of greens(such as spinach) with a banana and water. Adding a salad as a daily staple will ensure that you are getting 5-7 serving of veggies a day which is necessary to receive the fiber you need and the energy you want.

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5. Consume The Right Bread

If bread is part of your daily diet, be sure to get high-fiber bread. This is one of the easiest ways to increase your fiber intake in. Good quality high fiber breads often have added psyllium, flax and chia seeds—all which enhance the fiber count to about 5 grams of fiber per slice. If you are going to choose bread, choose wisely—aim for 5 grams of fiber per slice, and you will easily make your daily fiber quota

With these 5 tips in place, let’s look at a daily menu, and discover how easily you can get 25 grams of fiber in a day through food (no supplements required!)

Start the day with a slice of high fiber bread, an apple, and a tablespoon of pure nut butter. Right there, you have consumed 9 grams of fiber. Have a fruit for a snack ( 3 grams of fiber), add 1/2 cup of beans to your lunch (which can be soup or a salad), and you have another 10 grams of fiber just for lunch. Have a green smoothie as a late afternoon snack ( another 5 grams of fiber) and you are already at 27 grams of fiber, and we haven’t even reached dinner time! If you have a dinner with salad, a high fiber grain such as quinoa with some fish or chicken breast, you are well on your way to reaching 35 grams of fiber!

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As you can see, when you are smart about how you plan your day, it is easy and practical to reach the recommended daily fiber intake without any supplements or pills.

As you increase your fiber intake, be sure to drink plenty of water, which is important for the fiber to be absorbed and released from your system, helping with the detoxification process. When your body is fed right, and has the ability to detoxify on a daily basis, you will have more energy, clearer skin, and reach your ideal weight with ease.

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Last Updated on July 28, 2020

14 Low GI Foods for a Healthier Diet

14 Low GI Foods for a Healthier Diet

Diet trends may come and go, but a low-GI diet remains one of the few that has been shown to include benefits based on science. Low GI foods provide substantial health benefits over those with a high index, and they are key to maintaining a healthy weight.

What is GI? Glycemic index (GI) is the rate at which the carbohydrate content of a food is broken down into glucose and absorbed from the gut into the blood. When you eat foods containing carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into glucose, which is then absorbed into your bloodstream.[1]

The higher the GI of a food, the faster it will be broken down and cause your blood glucose (sugar) to rise. Foods with a high GI rating are digested very quickly and cause your blood sugar to spike. This is why it’s advisable to stick to low GI foods as much as possible, as the carbohydrate content of low GI foods will be digested slowly, allowing a more gradual rise in blood glucose levels.

Foods with a GI scale rating of 70 or more are considered to be high GI. Foods with a rating of 55 or below are considered low GI foods.

It’s important to note that the glycemic index of a food doesn’t factor in the quantity that you eat. For example, although watermelon has a high glycemic index, the water and fiber content of a standard serving of water means it won’t have a significant impact on your blood sugar.

Like watermelon, some high GI foods (such as baked potatoes) are high in nutrients. And some low GI foods (such as corn chips) contain high amounts of trans fats.

In most cases, however, the GI is an important means of gauging the right foods for a healthy diet.

Eating mainly low GI foods every day helps to provide your body with a slow, continuous supply of energy. The carbohydrates in low GI foods is digested slowly, so you feel satisfied for longer. This means you’ll be less likely to suffer from fluctuating sugar levels that can lead to cravings and snacking.

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Let’s continue with some of the best examples of low GI foods.

1. Quinoa

GI: 53

Quinoa has a slightly higher GI than rice or barley, but it contains a much higher proportion of protein. If you don’t get enough protein from the rest of your diet, quinoa could help. It’s technically a seed, so it’s also high in fiber–again, more than most grains. It’s also gluten-free, which makes it excellent for those with Celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

2. Brown Rice (Steamed)

GI: 50

Versatile and satisfying, brown rice is one of the best low GI foods and is a staple for many dishes around the world. It’s whole rice from which only the husk (the outermost layer) is removed, so it’s a great source of fiber. In fact, brown rice has been shown to help lower cholesterol, improve digestive function, promote fullness, and may even help prevent the formation of blood clots. Just remember to always choose brown over white!

3. Corn on the Cob

GI: 48

Although it tastes sweet, corn on the cob is a good source of slow-burning energy (and one of the tastiest low GI foods). It’s also a good plant source of Vitamin B12, folic acid, and iron, all of which are required for the healthy production of red blood cells in the body. It’s healthiest when eaten without butter and salt!

4. Bananas

GI: 47

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Bananas are a superfood in many ways. They’re rich in potassium and manganese and contain a good amount of vitamin C. Their low GI rating means they’re great for replenishing your fuel stores after a workout.

They are easy to add to smoothies, cereal, or kept on your desk for a quick snack. The less ripe they are, the lower the sugar content is! As one of the best low GI foods, it’s a great addition to any daily diet.

5. Bran Cereal

GI: 43

Bran is famous for being one of the highest cereal sources of fiber. It’s also rich in a huge range of nutrients: calcium, folic acid, iron, magnesium, and a host of B vitamins. Although bran may not be to everyone’s tastes, it can easily be added to other cereals to boost the fiber content and lower the overall GI rating.

6. Natural Muesli

GI: 40

Muesli–when made with unsweetened rolled oats, nuts, dried fruit, and other sugar-free ingredients–is one of the healthiest ways to start the day. It’s also very easy to make at home with a variety of other low GI foods. Add yogurt and fresh fruit for a nourishing, energy-packed breakfast.

7. Apples

GI: 40

Apple skin is a great source of pectin, an important prebiotic that helps to feed the good bacteria in your gut. Apples are also high in polyphenols, which function as antioxidants, and contain a good amount of vitamin C. They are best eaten raw with the skin on! Apples are one of a number of fruits[2] that have a low glycemic index. Be careful which fruits you choose, as many have a large amount of natural sugars[3].

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8. Apricots

GI: 30

Apricots provide both fiber and potassium, which make them an ideal snack for both athletes and anyone trying to keep sugar cravings at bay. They’re also a source of antioxidants and a range of minerals.

Apricots can be added to salads, cereals, or eaten as part of a healthy mix with nuts at any time of the day.

9. Kidney Beans

GI: 29

Kidney beans and other legumes provide a substantial serving of plant-based protein, so they can be used in lots of vegetarian dishes if you’re looking to adopt a plant-based diet[4]. They’re also packed with fiber and a variety of minerals, vitamins, antioxidants, and other beneficial plant compounds. They are great in soups, stews, or with (whole grain) tacos.

10. Barley

GI: 22

Barley is a cereal grain that can be eaten in lots of ways. It’s an excellent source of B vitamins, including niacin, thiamin, and pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), fiber, molybdenum, manganese, and selenium. It also contains beta-glucans, a type of fiber that can support gut health and has been shown to reduce appetite and food intake.

Please note that barley does contain gluten, which makes it unsuitable for anyone who is Celiac[5] or who follows a gluten-free diet. In this case, gluten-free alternatives might include quinoa, buckwheat, or millet.

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11. Raw Nuts

GI: 20

Most nuts have a low GI of between 0 and 20, with cashews slightly higher at around 22. Nuts, as one of the best low GI foods, are a crucial part of the Mediterranean diet[6] and are really the perfect snack: they’re a source of plant-based protein, high in fiber, and contain healthy fats. Add them to smoothies and salads to boost the nutritional content. Try to avoid roasted and salted nuts, as these are made with large amounts of added salt and (usually) trans fats.

12. Carrots

GI: 16

Raw carrots are not only a delicious low GI vegetable, but they really do help your vision! They contain vitamin A (beta carotene) and a host of antioxidants. They’re also low-calorie and high in fiber, and they contain good amounts of vitamin K1, potassium, and antioxidants. Carrots are great for those monitoring their weight as they’ve been linked to lower cholesterol levels.

13. Greek Yogurt

GI: 12

Unsweetened Greek yogurt is not only low GI, but it’s an excellent source of calcium and probiotics, as well. Probiotics help to keep your gut microbiome in balance and support your overall digestive health and immune function. Greek yogurt makes a healthy breakfast, snack, dessert, or a replacement for dip. The most common probiotic strains found in yogurt are Streptococcus thermophilus[7] (found naturally in yogurt) and Lactobacillus acidophilus[8] (which is often added by the manufacturer). You can also look into probiotic supplements for improving your gut health.

14. Hummus

GI: 6

When made the traditional way from chickpeas and tahini, hummus is a fantastic, low-GI dish. It’s a staple in many Middle Eastern countries and can be eaten with almost any savory meal. Full of fiber to maintain satiety and feed your good gut bacteria, hummus is great paired with freshly-chopped vegetables, such as carrots and celery.

Bottom Line

If you’re looking to eat healthier or simply cut down on snacking throughout the day, eating low GI foods is a great way to get started. Choose any of the above foods for a healthy addition to your daily diet and start feeling better for longer.

More Tips on Eating Healthy

Featured photo credit: Alexander Mils via unsplash.com

Reference

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