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What You Need to Know Before Buying a Home

What You Need to Know Before Buying a Home

House hunting can be tough. You may spend endless weeks or even months searching for that perfect home you are envisioning. When you do find it, your first impulse might be to jump right in and sign on the dotted line. After all, you don’t want to lose out to another buyer. However, before you take that plunge, here are 14 important things to do in order to ensure your dream home doesn’t turn into the stuff of nightmares.

1. Research the Neighborhood

Find out all you can about your new neighborhood online. Search government websites, tourism agencies, and any community forums or blogs. These places will let you know what’s going on in the community, what development is planned, and if any festivals or celebrations are in the works.

You’ll also want to check crime reports before moving in. Try the local police station for crime statistics, or try your search online. There are websites, such as CrimeReports, where you can find specific information linked to an address or a ZIP code.

neighborhood
    2. Know Your Loans

    Before you agree to a mortgage loan, make sure you know exactly what you’re getting into. Do you want a fixed rate or adjustable rate loan? What will your monthly payment amount be? Do you want it for 15 or 30 years? Are there any penalty fees, such as for early repayment? What will your closing costs be? Make sure you understand all these points before signing.

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    3. Take a Test Drive

    Sure, traffic may be light on the weekends when you’re visiting the home, but what will your workday commute be like? In order to avoid any unpleasant surprises, take a drive during rush hour to see exactly how much traffic there is and how long your commute will be.

    commute
      4. Check the Schools

      Be sure to check and see if your home is located in a good school district. You can check school district performance at GreatSchools. A school district that consistently performs well will help your home retain its value, so it’s important to look into this whether you have children or not.

      5. Get It in Writing

      Make sure your real estate agent includes everything that’s necessary in your offer – your price, finance terms, if you want the seller to assist with closing costs, a home-inspection contingency, what appliances will stay, closing date, etc. Read your offer carefully, and be sure to read anything you receive from the seller just as carefully before signing anything.

      6. Get a Home Inspection

      It’s vital to schedule a home inspection before agreeing to purchase a home. You need to know if the house is structurally sound, if any repairs are required and how much they would cost. You can request that the seller pay for any necessary repairs, in whole or in part.

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      If the home has a well, make sure the water has been tested. You should also check the tap water quality to see if you would need to put in a water purification system if you moved in.

      7. Get Full Disclosure

      Demand full disclosure from the sellers on any issues the home may have had. Were any major repairs ever required? Is there a history of termites? Have there been issues with water damage or mold? If the home was built before 1978, was lead-based paint used? Is the home at risk for natural disasters, like flooding, earthquakes or tornadoes? Has anyone died in the house or were any crimes committed there? These are all things you are entitled to know.

      8. Visit at Different Times

      Be sure to visit the house on weekends, weekdays and weeknights in order to see how quiet or noisy the neighborhood is. Are there loud weekend parties at the house next door? Does a train a few miles away honk their horn every Saturday morning when passing? It’s better to know these things in advance and avoid any unpleasant surprises.

      house at night
        9. Know Your Taxes and Other Fees

        Keep in mind that your mortgage will include much more than just your principal and interest payment. You will also need to figure in your tax and insurance payments. If you must join a homeowner association, know the fees. Also, don’t forget to include your utility bills to your list of monthly expenses. It all adds up.

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        10. Check Out Amenities

        Research amenities that are near your new home, such as parks, pools and golf courses. Will you be able to walk there? How long will you have to drive? It would be nice to know if a playground is nearby if you have children, or if the library is a mere five-minute drive away.

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          11. Find Out Where the Sun Hits

          This may not be something you’d usually think about, but it can be important, especially if you love having the sun wake you up in the mornings. Be sure to have windows facing east and west so you can have natural light the majority of the day.

          12. Be Neighborly

          Talk to neighbors to get a good feel for the neighborhood in general and the people you’ll be living near in particular. They can clue you in on fun events, like neighborhood garage sales, or on any problem neighbors, like the grumpy old lady who doesn’t like kids. (This is also a great time to ask about that train!)

          13. Figure in the Cost of Furniture

          If you’re moving from a tiny apartment to a large, single-family home, you will need to buy furniture. If you haven’t been shopping lately, you may be in for a rude surprise when you see those price tags. Try visiting flea markets and garage sales, or try a website like Freecycle, where people go to unload items they no longer want for free.

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          14. Consider Your Future

          Buying a home is a huge investment, and you’ll likely want to stay put for a while. Make sure the house will fit your future needs, whether you plan to have children, retire or face any other major life changes. Make sure the house works for you now and later.

          With this information at hand, you should be able to find the perfect house, in a great neighborhood, for you.

          Featured photo credit: Charles L via unsplash.com

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          Last Updated on June 13, 2019

          5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

          5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

          Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

          You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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          1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

          It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

          Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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          2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

          If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

          3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

          If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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          4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

          A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

          5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

          If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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          Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

          Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

          Reference

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