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What You Need to Know Before Buying a Home

What You Need to Know Before Buying a Home

House hunting can be tough. You may spend endless weeks or even months searching for that perfect home you are envisioning. When you do find it, your first impulse might be to jump right in and sign on the dotted line. After all, you don’t want to lose out to another buyer. However, before you take that plunge, here are 14 important things to do in order to ensure your dream home doesn’t turn into the stuff of nightmares.

1. Research the Neighborhood

Find out all you can about your new neighborhood online. Search government websites, tourism agencies, and any community forums or blogs. These places will let you know what’s going on in the community, what development is planned, and if any festivals or celebrations are in the works.

You’ll also want to check crime reports before moving in. Try the local police station for crime statistics, or try your search online. There are websites, such as CrimeReports, where you can find specific information linked to an address or a ZIP code.

neighborhood
    2. Know Your Loans

    Before you agree to a mortgage loan, make sure you know exactly what you’re getting into. Do you want a fixed rate or adjustable rate loan? What will your monthly payment amount be? Do you want it for 15 or 30 years? Are there any penalty fees, such as for early repayment? What will your closing costs be? Make sure you understand all these points before signing.

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    3. Take a Test Drive

    Sure, traffic may be light on the weekends when you’re visiting the home, but what will your workday commute be like? In order to avoid any unpleasant surprises, take a drive during rush hour to see exactly how much traffic there is and how long your commute will be.

    commute
      4. Check the Schools

      Be sure to check and see if your home is located in a good school district. You can check school district performance at GreatSchools. A school district that consistently performs well will help your home retain its value, so it’s important to look into this whether you have children or not.

      5. Get It in Writing

      Make sure your real estate agent includes everything that’s necessary in your offer – your price, finance terms, if you want the seller to assist with closing costs, a home-inspection contingency, what appliances will stay, closing date, etc. Read your offer carefully, and be sure to read anything you receive from the seller just as carefully before signing anything.

      6. Get a Home Inspection

      It’s vital to schedule a home inspection before agreeing to purchase a home. You need to know if the house is structurally sound, if any repairs are required and how much they would cost. You can request that the seller pay for any necessary repairs, in whole or in part.

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      If the home has a well, make sure the water has been tested. You should also check the tap water quality to see if you would need to put in a water purification system if you moved in.

      7. Get Full Disclosure

      Demand full disclosure from the sellers on any issues the home may have had. Were any major repairs ever required? Is there a history of termites? Have there been issues with water damage or mold? If the home was built before 1978, was lead-based paint used? Is the home at risk for natural disasters, like flooding, earthquakes or tornadoes? Has anyone died in the house or were any crimes committed there? These are all things you are entitled to know.

      8. Visit at Different Times

      Be sure to visit the house on weekends, weekdays and weeknights in order to see how quiet or noisy the neighborhood is. Are there loud weekend parties at the house next door? Does a train a few miles away honk their horn every Saturday morning when passing? It’s better to know these things in advance and avoid any unpleasant surprises.

      house at night
        9. Know Your Taxes and Other Fees

        Keep in mind that your mortgage will include much more than just your principal and interest payment. You will also need to figure in your tax and insurance payments. If you must join a homeowner association, know the fees. Also, don’t forget to include your utility bills to your list of monthly expenses. It all adds up.

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        10. Check Out Amenities

        Research amenities that are near your new home, such as parks, pools and golf courses. Will you be able to walk there? How long will you have to drive? It would be nice to know if a playground is nearby if you have children, or if the library is a mere five-minute drive away.

        park
          11. Find Out Where the Sun Hits

          This may not be something you’d usually think about, but it can be important, especially if you love having the sun wake you up in the mornings. Be sure to have windows facing east and west so you can have natural light the majority of the day.

          12. Be Neighborly

          Talk to neighbors to get a good feel for the neighborhood in general and the people you’ll be living near in particular. They can clue you in on fun events, like neighborhood garage sales, or on any problem neighbors, like the grumpy old lady who doesn’t like kids. (This is also a great time to ask about that train!)

          13. Figure in the Cost of Furniture

          If you’re moving from a tiny apartment to a large, single-family home, you will need to buy furniture. If you haven’t been shopping lately, you may be in for a rude surprise when you see those price tags. Try visiting flea markets and garage sales, or try a website like Freecycle, where people go to unload items they no longer want for free.

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          14. Consider Your Future

          Buying a home is a huge investment, and you’ll likely want to stay put for a while. Make sure the house will fit your future needs, whether you plan to have children, retire or face any other major life changes. Make sure the house works for you now and later.

          With this information at hand, you should be able to find the perfect house, in a great neighborhood, for you.

          Featured photo credit: Charles L via unsplash.com

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          Last Updated on March 13, 2019

          How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

          How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

          Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

          You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

          Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

          1. Work on the small tasks.

          When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

          Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

          2. Take a break from your work desk.

          Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

          Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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          3. Upgrade yourself

          Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

          The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

          4. Talk to a friend.

          Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

          Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

          5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

          If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

          Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

          Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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          6. Paint a vision to work towards.

          If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

          Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

          Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

          7. Read a book (or blog).

          The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

          Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

          Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

          8. Have a quick nap.

          If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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          9. Remember why you are doing this.

          Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

          What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

          10. Find some competition.

          Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

          Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

          11. Go exercise.

          Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

          Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

          As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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          Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

          12. Take a good break.

          Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

          Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

          Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

          Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

          More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

          Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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