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What are the Symptoms of Menopause?

What are the Symptoms of Menopause?

The symptoms of menopause are different for every woman.

The word meno- comes from the Greek word for “month”, while the word -pause comes from the Greek word pausis meaning “stop,” or “pause.” Menopause is characterized by the cessation of a woman’s menstrual cycles for at least one year, and although the average age is 51, menopause can occur in the 30s for some women, and for others, it won’t happen until much later, in their 60s.

Every woman experiences menopause differently: she might experience hot flashes for a while, and they may disappear. She may experience a whole range of symptoms or hardly any at all. This list includes the more typical symptoms of menopause, but is by no means exhaustive.

Be sure to check with your doctor if you have questions.

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Perimenopause

Menopause is something that doesn’t happen overnight. When a woman begins to experience symptoms, but still has menstrual cycles, she is in perimenopause; a gradual process leading up to menopause itself.

Women in perimenopause may experience symptoms that can last up to ten years before the true onset of menopause. Since every woman is different, this process could be much shorter or even longer.

Irregular Menstrual Cycles

One of the hallmark symptoms of perimenopause is that menstrual cycles become irregular. Within those cycles, bleeding can be very light or very heavy, and can change from month to month. A woman might not have periods every month.

If you are suddenly experiencing irregular periods, it’s a good idea to check with your doctor to be sure it is, in fact, perimenopause and not another underlying medical condition.

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Hot Flashes

Many women will experience hot flashes in their perimenopausal years: these are sudden sensations of feeling very warm that can last from around 30 seconds to several minutes. As these flashes generally occur around the face and chest area, sometimes women will also perspire and/or blush as they happen.

So far, doctors are unable to pinpoint what exactly causes them or what makes women susceptible to their occurrence. They do usually happen less frequently over time, with most women reporting they no longer get them after five to ten years.

Night Sweats

Just as a woman can experience hot flashes, she might also wake up suddenly in the night drenched in sweat. When this occurs, it can be difficult to go back to sleep or get comfortable, and that can contribute to fatigue and irritability the next day.

Vaginal Dryness

The vaginal area may become less elastic, accompanied by a sensation of dryness due to lower levels of estrogen. Painful intercourse can also occur, as well as itching and general discomfort in that area. Unfortunately, these conditions can also make a woman more prone to vaginal infections.

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Symptoms in the Urinary Tract

Changes with the urinary tract happen in a similar manner: the urethra (the tube connecting the bladder to the outside of the body), gets drier and tighter, and as a result, a woman might feel like she needs to use the restroom more frequently.  She might even experience a certain amount of urinary incontinence, where she “leaks” while standing, laughing or sneezing. These factors contribute to an increased risk of urinary tract infections.

Emotional Symptoms

A number of women will experience mood swings ranging from contentedness all the way to emotional upset, and it’s the changes in hormone levels that are to blame. Accompanying the mood swings, many women feel fatigued, due in part to the other symptoms of menopause, which can then lead to more severe mood swings.

Changes in Memory and Thinking

Because hormone levels are changing, women sometimes report they can’t remember things as well and feel downright forgetful. They may feel groggy or unable to concentrate, especially if they are already feeling tired or exhausted.

Other Symptoms

Other women experience physical changes such as tender breasts, achy or sore joints, itchy skin, weight gain, depression, thinning hair, hair growth in undesirable areas, tingling in the hands or feet, ringing in the ears, chronic indigestion, headaches, and more.

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Also, once menopause occurs, women need to watch out for osteoporosis in the years following. Low hormone levels accelerate bone loss and it’s important to be proactive about maintaining healthy bone density. Heart disease is another symptom that can creep up in post-menopausal women. Regular medical checkups are crucial to help prevent both osteoporosis and heart problems.

Treatments

While it’s important to know and understand menopausal symptoms, you don’t have to endure them in silence. Enlist the help of your physician and talk to friends or family about your experiences. In this way, you can approach menopause armed with information and reduce bothersome symptoms that might otherwise interfere with your life. There are many treatments out there that can really improve any symptoms you may have.

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

How to Stay Calm and Cool When You Are Extremely Stressful

How to Stay Calm and Cool When You Are Extremely Stressful

Being in a hurry all the time drains your energy. Your work and routine life make you feel overwhelmed. Getting caught up in things beyond your control stresses you out…

If you’d like to stay calm and cool in stressful situations, put the following 8 steps into practice:

1. Breathe

The next time you’re faced with a stressful situation that makes you want to hurry, stop what you’re doing for one minute and perform the following steps:

  • Take five deep breaths in and out (your belly should come forward with each inhale).
  • Imagine all that stress leaving your body with each exhale.
  • Smile. Fake it if you have to. It’s pretty hard to stay grumpy with a goofy grin on your face.

Feel free to repeat the above steps every few hours at work or home if you need to.

2. Loosen up

After your breathing session, perform a quick body scan to identify any areas that are tight or tense. Clenched jaw? Rounded shoulders? Anything else that isn’t at ease?

Gently touch or massage any of your body parts that are under tension to encourage total relaxation. It might help to imagine you’re in a place that calms you: a beach, hot tub, or nature trail, for example.

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3. Chew slowly

Slow down at the dinner table if you want to learn to be patient and lose weight. Shoveling your food down as fast as you can is a surefire way to eat more than you need to (and find yourself with a bellyache).

Be a mindful eater who pays attention to the taste, texture, and aroma of every dish. Chew slowly while you try to guess all of the ingredients that were used to prepare your dish.

Chewing slowly will also reduce those dreadful late-night cravings that sneak up on you after work.

4. Let go

Cliche as it sounds, it’s very effective.

The thing that seems like the end of the world right now?

It’s not. Promise.

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Stressing and worrying about the situation you’re in won’t do any good because you’re already in it, so just let it go.

Letting go isn’t easy, so here’s a guide to help you:

21 Things To Do When You Find It Hard To Let Go

5. Enjoy the journey

Focusing on the end result can quickly become exhausting. Chasing a bold, audacious goal that’s going to require a lot of time and patience? Split it into several mini-goals so you’ll have several causes for celebration.

Stop focusing on the negative thoughts. Giving yourself consistent positive feedback will help you grow patience, stay encouraged, and find more joy in the process of achieving your goals.

6. Look at the big picture

The next time you find your stress level skyrocketing, take a deep breath, and ask yourself:

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Will this matter to me…

  • Next week?
  • Next month?
  • Next year?
  • In 10 years?

Hint: No, it won’t.

I bet most of the stuff that stresses you wouldn’t matter the next week, maybe not even the next day.

Stop agonizing over things you can’t control because you’re only hurting yourself.

7. Stop demanding perfection of yourself

You’re not perfect and that’s okay. Show me a person who claims to be perfect and I’ll show you a dirty liar.

Demanding perfection of yourself (or anybody else) will only stress you out because it just isn’t possible.

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8. Practice patience every day

Below are a few easy ways you can practice patience every day, increasing your ability to remain calm and cool in times of stress:

  • The next time you go to the grocery store, get in the longest line.
  • Instead of going through the drive-thru at your bank, go inside.
  • Take a long walk through a secluded park or trail.

Final thoughts

Staying calm in stressful situations is possible, all you need is some daily practice.

Taking deep breaths and eat mindfully are some simple ways to train your brain to be more patient. But changing the way you think of a situation and staying positive are most important in keeping cool whenever you feel overwhelmed and stressful.

Featured photo credit: Brooke Cagle via unsplash.com

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