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Want To Boost Brain Power? Try Out These 10 Foods

Want To Boost Brain Power? Try Out These 10 Foods

Brain power can be boosted not just by brain training and physical exercise, but also by choosing our diets carefully and taking into account the findings of modern scientific research.  With an ever increasing life expectancy, we have an interest in healthy eating that is reaching epic proportions. And we now expect much more from our food than ever before.  Food is not just fuel to get us through the day.  All calories are not created equal.  We want our food to enhance our physical and mental activity, as well as our moods.  We want our food to contain cancer fighting agents and prevent cognitive decline.  We want our food to stimulate the brain growth of neonates and the immune systems of our newborns.

What most people don’t realize is that you can get all your essential nutrients from the food that you are consuming on an every day basis. And while there are many marketing experts that will try to sell you the extracted ingredients at high costs in pill format, most of the vitamins and minerals that pack the best brain punch can be found in their purest forms at your local grocery shop. This list below will get you started on a diet that is jam packed full of brain food to raise your IQ and maintain a very high standard of brain fitness. And of course, while you still need to get your physical exercise, your mental workouts, and your good night’s sleep, these foods will provide your body with the fuel needed to keep your brain running on the most efficient fuel.

1. Celery

Scientists at the University of Illinois found that a diet rich in a plant compound called luteolin reduces age-related inflammation in the brain and related memory deficits by directly inhibiting the release of inflammatory molecules in the brain (Jang, Dilger, Johnson, 2010). Celery is one food that is very high in luteolin.  Other vegetables such as peppers and carrots also contain high levels of luteolin. So if you want to keep your memory in tip top shape, eat plenty of celery, peppers and carrots.

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2. Walnuts

We hear a lot about the Omega-3s these days and indeed there is a large body of scientific evidence supporting that these fatty acids are essential for healthy brain activity.  Seniors who have high levels of Omega-3 in their blood score higher on cognitive ability tests and on other tests of memory (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2008).  Walnuts provide a very strong source of Omega-3.  While salmon actually appears to be a richer source of Omega-3, it is not likely that people will eat salmon every single day. Walnuts, on the other hand, can be eaten as a snack or put into cereals and salads with reckless abandon.  Other oily cold water fish such as mackerel, herring, sardines and trout are also full of the Omega-3 fatty acids so aim to include these as much as three times per week for maximal brain benefits.

3. Red meat

Well we have probably all heard that you shouldn’t eat too much red meat these days because over eating it can cause damage to the colon. However, when it comes down to the ever important vitamin B12, red meat is the strongest provider.  In fact, a B12 deficiency will cause nerve and brain damage!  So, while we don’t recommend that you eat red meat every day, we do recommend that you eat it on a weekly basis. There are B12 supplements and alternatives for those of us that don’t eat red meat, but unfortunately none of them are as rich a source of this vitamin as red meat. So while you can eat leafy greens and take vitamin supplements for your B12, you will need to eat vast amounts of them to get the same amount of B12 that you would get from red meat.

4.  Blueberries

The Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry (2012) states that a diet rich in blueberries is associated with faster learning, sharper thinking and improved memory retention.  Perhaps not surprisingly, strawberries, blackberries and other berries show similar benefits.

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5. Whole grains

We all need sugar to fuel our brains and our bodies.  However, the slow release sugar found in whole grains such as barley and bulgur provide longer lasting energy being supplied to the brain.  Remember that all sugar is not created equal.  If you want the good sugars that we need for the most efficient brain functioning, we need to move away from the fizzy drinks, cheap breads and cakes and stick with the whole grains. Indeed, a word of caution is necessary here; eating cheap breads, cakes and fizzy drinks instead of the healthy whole grains for your sugars, can actually reduce your IQ! But the great news is that you don’t have to be creative to get your whole grains in.  You can build whole grains into many different meals at any time of day.  So whether you want to find some tasty toppings for your oatmeal or bake your pizza base from scratch, here are some great recipes.

6. Chickpeas

Chickpeas have the combined advantage of complex carbohydrate to give you the energy you need plus protein which keeps you alert. Protein, contains high levels of amino acids, such as tyrosine, which in turn causes neurons to produce very important neurotransmitters like norepinephrine and dopamine.  These are associated with mental alertness which is an essential part of learning.  Chickpeas are also brimming with magnesium which is thought to play an important role in metabolizing energy that enables brain cell receptors to speed up the transmission of messages (i.e., quicker thinking and faster acting brains). Finally, scientists also report that foods high in magnesium also help to relax blood vessels which allows more blood to flow to the brain.  All in all, this is fantastic news for hummus lovers.  You should also try out these delicious spicy chickpea patties.

7. Dark chocolate

One new study published in Hypertension (2013) showed that consuming dark chocolate every day may improve thinking skills in adults with mild cognitive impairment.  In this study, older adults were enlisted to take part in research where they were asked to consume either low, moderate of high amounts of flavanols in a cocoa based beverage every day for eight weeks. The scientists found that there was a link between higher amounts of flavanols and improvements in tests of cognitive function.  Put simply, the higher the concentration of flavanols, the better people did on the tests of cognitive functioning.  The participants who consumed highest amounts of flavanols were able to complete tests more quickly and recall more information. One word of caution to readers is that this particular study was funded by Mars so there is a potential conflict of interest here. However, the finding that flavanols are good for you is not exactly news. Flananols are widely known to reduce blood pressure and it may be that their effect on increasing blood flow is having a secondary effect on brain functioning.  Flavanols are also found in red wine, grapes, apples and tea, if for any reason you do not wish to consume vast quantities of dark chocolate.

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8. Almonds

Almonds are very high in vitamin E which is thought to protect the brain from age related damage and to improve learning and memory skills. Almonds also contain riboflavin and L-carnitrine which are widely accepted as nutrients that boost brain activity.

9. Broccoli

Broccoli contains Vitamin K which strengthens cognitive abilities and Choline which has been found to improve memory.  Broccoli also contains folic acid which can help to ward of Alzheimer’s disease.  Some studies also suggest that a lack of folic acid can lead to depression so broccoli may be good for our brains on many levels, not strictly in terms of doing well on IQ or memory tests.  If you’re not that into broccoli on its own, check out this site for a delicious broccoli, cannellini bean and cheddar soup.

10. Avocado

In 1994, Miller found that the workings of the human brain depends on communication between our brain’s 100 billion neurons.  The axon of each neuron is coated in a type of insulation known as myelin.  When myelin is thicker, the transmission of impulses between neurons is faster. This is turn is linked to higher intelligence. Avocados are known to have a high fat content and yet this is fat that is good for our brains. Avocados are rich in a fatty acid called “oleic acid” which helps build myelin sheathes found in the white matter in the brain. Neurons without myelin process information at slower speeds. So while we know that correlation is not the same as causation, eating avocados does appear to be a helpful method for building up our myelin.  Other sources of oleic acid include olives, almonds and pecans.

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A few recipes using these and other good brain foods can be found here.

Now go forth, eat well and boost that brain power!

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Last Updated on July 10, 2020

How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries

How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries

We all have them—those hurtful, frustrating, offensive, manipulative people in our lives. No matter how hard we try to surround ourselves with positive and kind people, there will always be those who will disrespect, insult, berate, and misuse you if we allow them to.

We may, for a variety of reasons, not be able to avoid them, but we can determine how we interact with them and how we allow them to interact with us.

So, how to take control of your life and stop being pushed around?

Learning to set clear firm boundaries with the people in our lives at work and in our personal lives is the best way to protect ourselves from the negative effects of this kind of behavior.

What Boundaries Are (And What They’re Not)

Boundaries are limits

—they are not threats or ultimatums. Boundaries inform or teach. They are not a form of punishment.

Boundaries are firm lines—determined by you—which cannot be crossed by those around you. They are guidelines for how you will allow others to treat you and what kind of behaviors you will expect.

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Healthy personal boundaries help protect you from physical or emotional pain. You may also need to set firm boundaries at work to ensure you and your time are not disrespected. Don’t allow others to take advantage of your kindness and generosity.

Clear boundaries communicate to others that you demand respect and consideration—that you are willing to stand up for yourself and that you will not be a doormat for anyone. They are a “no trespassing” sign that makes it very clear when a line has been crossed and that there will be consequences for doing so.

Boundaries are not set with the intention of changing other people. They may change how people interact with you, but they are more about enforcing your needs than attempting to change the general behavior and attitude of others.

How to Establish Boundaries and Take Control of Your Life

Here are some ways that you can establish boundaries and take control of your life.

1. Self-Awareness Comes First

Before you can establish boundaries with others, you first need to understand what your needs are.

You are entitled to respect. You have the right to protect yourself from inappropriate or offensive behavior. Setting boundaries is a way of honoring your needs.

To set appropriate boundaries, you need to be clear about what healthy behaviors look like—what healthy relationships look like.

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You first have to become more aware of your feelings and honest with yourself about your expectations and what you feel is appropriate behavior:

  • Where do you need to establish better boundaries?
  • When do you feel disrespected?
  • When do you feel violated, frustrated, or angered by the behavior of others?
  • In what situations do you feel you are being mistreated or taken advantage of?
  • When do you want to be alone?
  • How much space do you need?

You need to honor your own needs and boundaries before you can expect others to honor them. This allows you to take control of your life.

2. Clear Communication Is Essential

Inform others clearly and directly what your expectations are. It is essential to have clear communication if you want others to respect your boundaries. Explain in an honest and respectful tone what you find offensive or unacceptable.

Many people simply aren’t aware that they are behaving inappropriately. They may never have been taught proper manners or consideration for others.

3. Be Specific but Don’t Blame

Taking a blaming or punishing attitude automatically puts people on the defensive. People will not listen when they feel attacked. It’s part of human nature.

That said, you do not need to overexplain or defend yourself. Boundaries are not open to compromise.

Sample language:

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  • “You may not…yell or raise your voice to me…”
  • “I need…to be treated with respect…”
  • “It’s not okay when…you take things from my desk without asking…”
  • “I won’t…do your work…cover for you anymore…”
  • “It’s not acceptable when…you ridicule or insult me…”
  • “I am uncomfortable when…you use offensive language”
  • “I will no longer be able to…lend you money…”

Being able to communicate these without sounding accusatory is essential if you want others to respect your boundaries so you can take control of your life.

4. Consequences Are Often Necessary

Determine what the appropriate consequences will be when boundaries are crossed. If it’s appropriate, be clear about those consequences upfront when communicating those boundaries to others.

Follow through. People won’t respect your boundaries if you don’t enforce them.

Standing our ground and forcing consequences doesn’t come easily to us. We want to be nice. We want people to like us, but we shouldn’t have to trade our self-respect to gain friends or to achieve success.

We may be tempted to let minor disrespect slide to avoid conflict, but as the familiar saying goes, “if you give people an inch, they’ll take a mile.”

It’s much easier to address offensive or inappropriate behavior now than to wait until that behavior has gotten completely out of hand.

It’s also important to remember that positive reinforcement is even more powerful than negative consequences. When people do alter the way they treat you, acknowledge it. Let people know that you notice and appreciate their efforts.

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Final Thoughts

Respect is always a valid reason for setting a boundary. Don’t defend yourself or your needs. Boundaries are often necessary to protect your time, your space, and your feelings. And these are essential if you want to take control of your life.

Start with the easiest boundaries first. Setting boundaries is a skill that needs to be practiced. Enlist support from others if necessary. Inform people immediately when they have crossed the line.

Don’t wait. Communicate politely and directly. Be clear about the consequences and follow them through.

The better you become at setting your own boundaries, the better you become at recognizing and respecting the boundaries of others.

Remember that establishing boundaries is your right. You are entitled to respect. You can’t control how other people behave, but you do have control over the way you allow people to treat you.

Learning to set boundaries is not always easy, but with time, it will become more comfortable. You may eventually find that boundaries become automatic and you no longer need to consciously set them.

They will simply become a natural extension of your self-respect.

Featured photo credit: Thomas Kelley via unsplash.com

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