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Top 7 Myths About Cell Phones and Driving

Top 7 Myths About Cell Phones and Driving

There are many myths associated with driving while talking on a cell phone, texting, taking pictures, or messing around with a map feature.  New legislature has been enacted in an attempt to reduce the number of auto accidents related to cell phone usage, however, most of it is ineffective.  Some new laws banning drivers from texting behind the wheel have even increased the number of accidents related to that practice.  Below are the top seven myths about driving while using a cell phone.

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Top 7 Myths About Cell Phones and Driving

    Myth 1:  Hands-free phones are safe to use while driving

    Various studies have shown that driving with one hand is not the primary contributing factor to cell phone-related auto accidents.  In the dark ages before cell phones were popular, there seemed to be little concern about radio stations or cassette tapes causing auto accidents.  A study conducted by the National Safety Council concluded that carrying on a conversation was far more distracting than dialing or holding a cell phone.  They hypothesized that chatting with other passengers in a car does not pose as much of a danger as the passengers can act as another set of eyes.  Cell phones cannot.

    Myth 2:  Laws banning texting while driving reduce accidents

    After numerous states implemented laws banning texting while driving, the number of auto accidents went up.  Instead of texting with the phone in plain sight, drivers began to text while holding the phone lower to avoid a ticket.  Certain accidents that were avoided by drivers seeing a potential collision out of their peripheral vision were no longer avoided.  These laws are not only well-intentioned but necessary.  Drivers should take the initiative to stop texting while driving.

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    Myth 3:  Most people can multitask

    Only around 2% of the population can actually multitask.  Multitasking can be defined as doing two unrelated things that both require attention simultaneously.  For example, writing a report while fluently carrying on a conversation would be considered multitasking.  Writing a report in front of the television would not.  The television would not require attention, but carrying on a fluent conversation would.  Most people think they can multitask, but very few people actually have the ability to do so.

    Myth 4:  It is OK to read texts while driving but not send them

    Reading and sending text messages while driving is dangerous.  When reading texts, a driver is not only failing to pay attention to his or her surroundings, but he or she isn’t even looking at the road.  Drivers are meant to periodically glance at gauges such as a car’s speedometer.  Reading texts is dangerous due to a driver’s shifted attention to the text as well as the extended period of time it takes to glance from phone to road.

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    Myth 5:  It is OK to read directions or maps on a phone while driving

    Messing around with maps and directions on smartphones is just as bad as texting.  If you’re lost, pull over to find your location and the right directions.  Drivers tend to drive carelessly and erratically when lost if they panic.  Instead of panicking and risking an accident, find a good spot to park and regroup.

    Myth 6:  Taking pictures with phones while driving is acceptable

    This is simply confusing.  People take pictures with phones while driving.  Also motorists have also been observed brushing their teeth, eating bowls of cereal, and engaging in other bizarre behaviors during morning commutes.  If you must take a picture, pull over.

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    Myth 7:  There is no safe time to talk on a cell phone while driving

    There is one safe time to text, talk, and do whatever else on your cell phone while technically driving.  Your car must be in park.  In the event you are stuck behind a major accident on the interstate for a number of hours, all types of cell phone use is safe as long as the car is in park.  Note that you can still be cited for texting and driving, even if your car is not moving.  Slowly moving cars during rush hour do not count.  To be safe while using your phone, your car must be in park.

    Cell phone usage and driving

    Instead of risking being hurt or harming someone else in an accident, use your cell phone only one way while driving.  Have your car in park.  If injured after an auto accident, seek expert help.  Instead of engaging in legal trouble and hospital visits, simply park your car before fumbling with your phone.

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    Last Updated on March 13, 2019

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

    You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

    Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

    1. Work on the small tasks.

    When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

    Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

    2. Take a break from your work desk.

    Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

    Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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    3. Upgrade yourself

    Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

    The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

    4. Talk to a friend.

    Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

    Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

    5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

    If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

    Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

    Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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    6. Paint a vision to work towards.

    If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

    Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

    Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

    7. Read a book (or blog).

    The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

    Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

    Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

    8. Have a quick nap.

    If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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    9. Remember why you are doing this.

    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

    10. Find some competition.

    Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

    11. Go exercise.

    Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

    Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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    Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

    12. Take a good break.

    Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

    Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

    More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

    Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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