Advertising
Advertising

Top 7 Myths About Cell Phones and Driving

Top 7 Myths About Cell Phones and Driving

There are many myths associated with driving while talking on a cell phone, texting, taking pictures, or messing around with a map feature.  New legislature has been enacted in an attempt to reduce the number of auto accidents related to cell phone usage, however, most of it is ineffective.  Some new laws banning drivers from texting behind the wheel have even increased the number of accidents related to that practice.  Below are the top seven myths about driving while using a cell phone.

Advertising

Top 7 Myths About Cell Phones and Driving

    Myth 1:  Hands-free phones are safe to use while driving

    Various studies have shown that driving with one hand is not the primary contributing factor to cell phone-related auto accidents.  In the dark ages before cell phones were popular, there seemed to be little concern about radio stations or cassette tapes causing auto accidents.  A study conducted by the National Safety Council concluded that carrying on a conversation was far more distracting than dialing or holding a cell phone.  They hypothesized that chatting with other passengers in a car does not pose as much of a danger as the passengers can act as another set of eyes.  Cell phones cannot.

    Myth 2:  Laws banning texting while driving reduce accidents

    After numerous states implemented laws banning texting while driving, the number of auto accidents went up.  Instead of texting with the phone in plain sight, drivers began to text while holding the phone lower to avoid a ticket.  Certain accidents that were avoided by drivers seeing a potential collision out of their peripheral vision were no longer avoided.  These laws are not only well-intentioned but necessary.  Drivers should take the initiative to stop texting while driving.

    Advertising

    Myth 3:  Most people can multitask

    Only around 2% of the population can actually multitask.  Multitasking can be defined as doing two unrelated things that both require attention simultaneously.  For example, writing a report while fluently carrying on a conversation would be considered multitasking.  Writing a report in front of the television would not.  The television would not require attention, but carrying on a fluent conversation would.  Most people think they can multitask, but very few people actually have the ability to do so.

    Myth 4:  It is OK to read texts while driving but not send them

    Reading and sending text messages while driving is dangerous.  When reading texts, a driver is not only failing to pay attention to his or her surroundings, but he or she isn’t even looking at the road.  Drivers are meant to periodically glance at gauges such as a car’s speedometer.  Reading texts is dangerous due to a driver’s shifted attention to the text as well as the extended period of time it takes to glance from phone to road.

    Advertising

    Myth 5:  It is OK to read directions or maps on a phone while driving

    Messing around with maps and directions on smartphones is just as bad as texting.  If you’re lost, pull over to find your location and the right directions.  Drivers tend to drive carelessly and erratically when lost if they panic.  Instead of panicking and risking an accident, find a good spot to park and regroup.

    Myth 6:  Taking pictures with phones while driving is acceptable

    This is simply confusing.  People take pictures with phones while driving.  Also motorists have also been observed brushing their teeth, eating bowls of cereal, and engaging in other bizarre behaviors during morning commutes.  If you must take a picture, pull over.

    Advertising

    Myth 7:  There is no safe time to talk on a cell phone while driving

    There is one safe time to text, talk, and do whatever else on your cell phone while technically driving.  Your car must be in park.  In the event you are stuck behind a major accident on the interstate for a number of hours, all types of cell phone use is safe as long as the car is in park.  Note that you can still be cited for texting and driving, even if your car is not moving.  Slowly moving cars during rush hour do not count.  To be safe while using your phone, your car must be in park.

    Cell phone usage and driving

    Instead of risking being hurt or harming someone else in an accident, use your cell phone only one way while driving.  Have your car in park.  If injured after an auto accident, seek expert help.  Instead of engaging in legal trouble and hospital visits, simply park your car before fumbling with your phone.

    More by this author

    How to Cook Bacon Perfectly Like a Chef Top 7 Myths About Cell Phones and Driving Ten of the Weirdest Laws in the USA You May Find it Interesting How to Treat Comorbid Depression Associated with Chronic Illness 4 Tips for Finding a Good Physician

    Trending in Lifestyle

    1 How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life 2 9 Natural Remedies for Insomnia to Help You Achieve Quality Sleep 3 Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny 4 If You Think You’re in an Unhappy Marriage, Remember These 5 Things 5 How Guided Meditation for Sleep Improves Your Mindset While Awake

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on December 2, 2018

    How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

    How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

    Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

    The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

    Advertising

    The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

    Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

    Advertising

    Review Your Past Flow

    Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

    Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

    Advertising

    Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

    Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

    Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

    Advertising

    Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

    Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

    We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

    Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

      Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

      Read Next