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Tonic Water: The Must-Know Facts

Tonic Water: The Must-Know Facts

The girlfriend and I spent the last couple months getting to know a refreshing summer drink: gin and tonic. A half dozen handles o’ gin later, we began a discussion on tonic water. I thought it was no different than sparkling water, but it turns out this mixer has a bit more going for it. If you’d like to join us in partaking in the iconic G and T cocktail, here are a few must-know facts about tonic water.

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    #1 Tonic Water Was Originally A Prophylactic

    Tonic water is made by dissolving a natural white crystalline alkaloid called quinine, which has been used for centuries (and as recently as the 1940s) to prevent malaria and treat fever, pain, inflammation, lupus, and arthritis. Because of the low-cost, quinine is still used as a medicine today in many impoverished countries. It’s available with a prescription in the US as well. In tonic water, the dosage of quinine is minimal, only used to provide the signature tart flavor. Even so, many of the healing properties are still intact — you’re just taking a fraction of a children’s dose instead.

    #2 Gin Makes Tonic Water Palatable

    We’re used to thinking of a mixer as something you add to alcohol to make it taste better. The G and T was invented in reverse: troops of the British East India Company in India drank tonic water to prevent malaria, but the taste was too bitter and unpleasant. Gin (along with lime and sugar) was originally added to tonic water by the army in order to make the tonic more palatable. These days, the sugar is already added to tonic water, and limes are sometimes replaced by lemons (for Beefeater gin) or a cucumber slice (for Hendrick’s gin).

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    #3 Tonic Water Today Can Be Hard To Find

    Over-the-counter tonic water these days isn’t always easy to find — many grocery stores carry it in their mixer section, and some occasionally carry it in their soda and soft drink section. Liquor stores that carry gin will often carry tonic water as well, although this isn’t always the case. While there is a variety of tonic water makers, you won’t see much competition in stores.

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      #4 Tonic Water Is as Bad For You as Soda

      Although it sounds like it’s only water, a 12-oz can of tonic water contains 44 mg of sodium and 32g of sugar. Many sodas (pop, Coke, whatever you call it in your neck of the woods) contain around 33g of sugar in the same 12-oz can. The calorie count in tonic water is 124 versus 138 calories in your average can of soda. Even still, a gin and tonic has less calories and sugar than a Cuba Libre (rum and coke), since rum is derived from sugar itself.

      #5 Tonic Water is Fluorescent

      Quinine is fluorescent, meaning it will glow under UV (black) light. The active ingredient is so sensitive to UV light that it’ll even glow under direct sunlight (although this is a bit harder to notice since the sun is out). The girlfriend and I have been trying all summer, but thus far, we have been unable to glow in the dark ourselves, regardless of how many G and T’s we drank. We’re no quitters though… to be continued…

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      #6 Tonic Water Nutritional Facts

      Percent Daily Value*

      *Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

      Nutrition Table

        Original Source: USDA

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        Last Updated on March 13, 2019

        How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

        How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

        Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

        You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

        Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

        1. Work on the small tasks.

        When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

        Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

        2. Take a break from your work desk.

        Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

        Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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        3. Upgrade yourself

        Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

        The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

        4. Talk to a friend.

        Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

        Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

        5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

        If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

        Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

        Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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        6. Paint a vision to work towards.

        If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

        Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

        Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

        7. Read a book (or blog).

        The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

        Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

        Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

        8. Have a quick nap.

        If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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        9. Remember why you are doing this.

        Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

        What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

        10. Find some competition.

        Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

        Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

        11. Go exercise.

        Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

        Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

        As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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        Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

        12. Take a good break.

        Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

        Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

        Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

        Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

        More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

        Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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