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Three Easy Tricks To Never Count Calories Again

Three Easy Tricks To Never Count Calories Again

Ever notice that when things are complicated, tedious, or generally not fun, the likelihood of quitting is higher? When it comes to diets and healthy eating, having to count calories is all of those things. Nobody feels like tracking, measuring or weighing every little thing they eat, but the good old law of thermodynamics (calories in vs calories out) is often hailed as the king of all weight loss rules.

I am a huge proponent of keeping things simple; finding something deeper and more meaningful than just “lose 10 lbs” or “fit back into my skinny jeans” to motivate you, and above all, injecting some enjoyment in to the process. These three things increase the likelihood that you follow through and see results drastically.

The three easy tricks I have for you today will eliminate the need to ever count calories again, yet still get you results. Whether you’re seeking fat loss, more energy, or to address any other diet-related disease or illness, try these tricks out for 30 days and prepare to be pleasantly surprised.

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These tips are mostly inspired by my nutrition training through Metabolic Effect, founded by Dr’s Jade and Keoni Teta, authors of The New ME Diet.  

Trick #1: Follow this simple Label Rule for anything with a label

Reading labels can be one of the MOST confusing (and misleading) parts of healthy eating. We get distracted by words like “natural” “healthy” and “wholesome.” We even assume that just because something is vegan or gluten free that it’s healthy. This isn’t always the case. The Label Rule outlines the only three things that actually matter: Total Fat, Sodium, and Hormonal Carbs.

Total Fat should be less than or equal to 15. Lower numbers are better and you want to avoid foods with hydrogenated oils, trans-fats or mostly saturated fat. Foods that have higher mono-unsaturated fats and omega-3 oils are best.

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Sodium content should be less than or equal to 200mg. Foods with lower sodium numbers and higher potassium numbers are better.

Hormonal Carbs. This is where the genius of the Metabolic Effect approach shines. Unlike the calorie counting approach to losing weight, focusing on hormonal carbs prompts your body to shed fat specifically.

You’ll hear people say “muscle weighs more than fat”, but that’s not true.  Five pounds is five pounds, regardless of what it’s made of. Muscle is more dense that fat though, so it takes up less space. Picture a five pound brick versus a five pound pillow. Get it now? To calculate Hormonal Carbs you subtract Dietary Fiber (including any sugar alcohols) and Protein from the Total Carbs. Choose foods with a Hormonal Carb value less than 15. Lower numbers are better, and negative numbers are best. This means you’ll get the energy you need from the food, but you won’t be left with excess sugar that winds up getting stored in your body as fat when you don’t burn it off. Another great book on this topic is Why We Get Fat by Gary Taubes if you’re interested!

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Carbs are not in fact the enemy—it’s just the amounts and frequency with which we consume them that cause problems. Here’s a visual example:

Screen Shot 2013-08-05 at 6.16.05 PM

    Trick #2: Eat according to this ideal plate at every meal

    The thing I love most about this trick is that it makes eating out EASY. Most of us are pretty good at eating clean in our own little controlled environments at home, but toss a menu into the mix and give us a few naughty options and it’s bad news bears. Once you know what your plate should look like at every meal, you can use this as your barometer when eating out-unless you know ahead of time, it’s a treat meal…in which case, go crazy! (and tag me on Instagram @lizdialto and let me know, I love treat meals!!)

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    The ideal plate is made up of half veggies (the greener the better), a fist sized portion of lean protein (if you’re a veggie, then beans, tofu, tempeh etc. count for you), then just five to ten bites of carbs. The bite rule is what protects you from having to count calories in this trick.

    Remember in Trick #1 how I said carbs aren’t the problem, but rather the amount of carbs? Sticking to 5-10 bites of carbs that fit the label rule puts you in the sweet spot for fat burning instead of fat storing. Here’s an example: it’s a portion of grass-fed steak and a big salad with mixed greens, quinoa, strawberries and balsamic dressing.

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      Now I know what you’re probably thinking because clients give me this objection all the time “only 5-10 bites?!” When you follow this rule you can actually eat more food, it’s just more food that’s better for you. All we’re doing is shifting around ratios on your plate.  More protein and veggies, less carbs. Side effects of eating this way include: fat loss, weight loss, more energy, better looking skin, and frequently allergy and digestive issue symptoms clear up, too.  So give it a try—you’ve got plenty to lose.

      Trick #3: Eat your protein and veggies first, save your carbs for last

      The reason for this is simple: protein and veggies are the best things for you on your plate and they’re more satiating. By saving your carbs for last, you give yourself a better shot at feeling full at the end of the meal and not over eating.

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      Last Updated on November 20, 2018

      10 Reasons Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail

      10 Reasons Why New Year’s Resolutions Fail

      A new year beautifully symbolizes a new chapter opening in the book that is your life. But while so many people like you aspire to achieve ambitious goals, only 12% of you will ever experience the taste of victory. Sound bad? It is. 156 million people (that’s 156,000,000) will probably give up on their resolution before you can say “confetti.” Keep on reading to learn why New Year’s resolutions fail (and how to succeed).

      Note: Since losing weight is the most common New Year’s resolution, I chose to focus on weight loss (but these principles can be applied to just about any goal you think of — make it work for you!).

      1. You’re treating a marathon like a sprint.

      Slow and steady habit change might not be sexy, but it’s a lot more effective than the “I want it ALL and I want it NOW!” mentality. Small changes stick better because they aren’t intimidating (if you do it right, you’ll barely even notice them!).

      If you have a lot of bad habits today, the last thing you need to do is remodel your entire life overnight. Want to lose weight? Stop it with the crash diets and excessive exercise plans. Instead of following a super restrictive plan that bans anything fun, add one positive habit per week. For example, you could start with something easy like drinking more water during your first week. The following week, you could move on to eating 3 fruits and veggies every day. And the next week, you could aim to eat a fistful of protein at every meal.

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      2. You put the cart before the horse.

      “Supplementing” a crappy diet is stupid, so don’t even think about it. Focus on the actions that produce the overwhelming amount of results. If it’s not important, don’t worry about it.

      3. You don’t believe in yourself.

      A failure to act can cripple you before you leave the starting line. If you’ve tried (and failed) to set a New Year’s resolution (or several) in the past, I know it might be hard to believe in yourself. Doubt is a nagging voice in your head that will resist personal growth with every ounce of its being. The only way to defeat doubt is to believe in yourself. Who cares if you’ve failed a time or two? This year, you can try again (but better this time).

      4. Too much thinking, not enough doing.

      The best self-help book in the world can’t save you if you fail to take action. Yes, seek inspiration and knowledge, but only as much as you can realistically apply to your life. If you can put just one thing you learn from every book or article you read into practice, you’ll be on the fast track to success.

      5. You’re in too much of a hurry.

      If it was quick-and-easy, everybody would do it, so it’s in your best interest to exercise your patience muscles.

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      6. You don’t enjoy the process.

      Is it any wonder people struggle with their weight when they see eating as a chore and exercise as a dreadful bore? The best fitness plan is one that causes the least interruption to your daily life. The goal isn’t to add stress to your life, but rather to remove it.

      The best of us couldn’t bring ourselves to do something we hate consistently, so make getting in shape fun, however you’ve gotta do it. That could be participating in a sport you love, exercising with a good friend or two, joining a group exercise class so you can meet new people, or giving yourself one “free day” per week where you forget about your training plan and exercise in any way you please.

      7. You’re trying too hard.

      Unless you want to experience some nasty cravings, don’t deprive your body of pleasure. The more you tell yourself you can’t have a food, the more you’re going to want it. As long as you’re making positive choices 80-90% of the time, don’t sweat the occasional indulgence.

      8. You don’t track your progress.

      Keeping a written record of your training progress will help you sustain an “I CAN do this” attitude. All you need is a notebook and a pen. For every workout, record what exercises you do, the number of repetitions performed, and how much weight you used if applicable. Your goal? Do better next time. Improving your best performance on a regular basis offers positive feedback that will encourage you to keep going.

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      9. You have no social support.

      It can be hard to stay motivated when you feel alone. The good news? You’re not alone: far from it. Post a status on Facebook asking your friends if anybody would like to be your gym or accountability buddy. If you know a co-worker who shares your goal, try to coordinate your lunch time and go out together so you’ll be more likely to make positive decisions. Join a support group of like-minded folks on Facebook, LinkedIn, or elsewhere on the internet. Strength in numbers is powerful, so use it to your advantage.

      10. You know your what but not your why.

      The biggest reason why most New Year’s resolutions fail: you know what you want but you not why you want it.

      Yes: you want to get fit, lose weight, or be healthy… but why is your goal important to you? For example:

      Do you want to be fit so you can be a positive example that your children can admire and look up to?

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      Do you want to lose fat so you’ll feel more confident and sexy in your body than ever before?

      Do you want to be healthy so you’ll have increased clarity, energy, and focus that would carry over into every single aspect of your life?

      Whether you’re getting in shape because you want to live longer, be a good example, boost your energy, feel confident, have an excuse to buy hot new clothes, or increase your likelihood of getting laid (hey, I’m not here to judge) is up to you. Forget about any preconceived notions and be true to yourself.

      • The more specific you can make your goal,
      • The more vivid it will be in your imagination,
      • The more encouraged you’ll be,
      • The more likely it is you will succeed (because yes, you CAN do this!).

      I hope this guide to why New Year’s resolutions fail helps you achieve your goals this year. If you found this helpful, please pass it along to some friends so they can be successful just like you. What do you hope to accomplish next year?

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