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This List of Family Camping Tips Will Make Your Life Much Easier

This List of Family Camping Tips Will Make Your Life Much Easier

There’s nothing more relaxing than being out in nature, away from it all—unless you forgot to bring toilet paper, bug spray, or extra batteries for the flashlight.

And there’s nothing more bonding than sitting around a campfire together—unless you can’t get the fire started in the first place.

Camping really is great—don’t get me wrong—but it also requires planning and preparation work roughly the equivalent of building an entire house with your bare hands. If you crave that family time, togetherness, and the peace of nature, but you’re intimidated by the gear, the prep, and the set-up, check out these tips. They’ll help you avoid those “Oops!” moments and put some true brilliance into your camping adventures.

1. Prep all snacks and meal ingredients before you leave.

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    You can check out an entire tutorial (with some recipe links) over at Echoes of Laughter. But the real take-away I want to drive home is to do as much prep work as possible when you’re still in your fully stocked kitchen, with your cutting boards and sink (you know, the one with running water?) and array of cutting, chopping, peeling, and prepping utensils. So if you want to have, say, kabobs one night, go ahead and chop those vegetables up to the right size; chop and marinate the meat; then freeze them in separate zip-top bags.

    For snacks, if you want anything besides individually pre-packaged stuff, prep and divide into snack-sized servings so you and your kids can just grab and go. Trust me; the fewer times you have to wash that camp knife using tepid water from a gallon jug, the happier you’ll be.

    2. Take glow sticks. Lots of glow sticks.

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      There are several reasons that glow sticks are awesome for camping.

      As mentioned at Living on a Latte, glow sticks are excellent for seeing your kids at night, and kids happen to think glow sticks are awesome. If you have a dog along with you, attach one to the collar so you can see pup coming before you trip over him.

      Hang a glow stick on tree stumps, tent pegs, or other obstacles that are obvious in the day, but are dangerous in the darkness. Nothing takes the fun out of family togetherness like Dad getting his foot impaled. Again.

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      You can also color-code stuff, and glow sticks can help you keep that going at night. If Kid #1 has the green sleeping bag, attach a few green glow sticks to it so it’s easy for him to find his spot at night.

      3. Take some toys for the kids.

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        No, you don’t need to bring along the entire Lego collection, a stack of board games, or all the sports gear you own.

        And camping is a perfect time to turn off the screens and encourage your kids to enjoy real-world fun.

        But don’t assume that your kids will be so enthralled by the bugs and branches around that they’ll find a dozen ways to entertain themselves. Come prepared with a simple, portable, but fun toy collection that will help spur them on to fun.

        For example, you might include:

        • a small collection of sports gear, especially if you’re near a big field or open area. A football, soccer ball, or baseball and bat; go with whatever sport(s) your child likes best.
        • some “explore the outdoors” stuff, such as a pair of binoculars, magnifying glass, bug keeper, butterfly net, and children’s nature guide.
        • a small selection of whatever your child is currently most into: trucks, trains, toy guns, dolls, dress-up stuff, a small box of Legos.
        • fun outdoor items, such as water guns, chalk, bubbles, toy buckets and shovels.
        • a few quiet toys, such as play-dough, a few art supplies, a few books, and/or a deck of cards. Travel-sized and/or magnetic versions of their favorite board games are nice to have along, too, especially for a rainy afternoon or some downtime after a hike.

        My kids always enjoy building their own, very temporary shelters for outdoor play; with a length of rope and a few old blankets, they’ve concocted teepees, lean-tos, and (I use the term loosely) their very own tents. Building the shelter is half the fun, and then they love hanging out in there with some toys and books.

        4. A tent is not enough. You need tarps.

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          Imagine you’re camping.

          Imagine you have a great tent, and you’re having a great time, and your kids love it, and everything is awesome.

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          Imagine you wake up the next morning to rain. And the rain doesn’t go away. And after two hours of everybody being stuck in that great tent, you’re ready to swear off camping forever.

          This, my friend, is why you need a tarp. Or multiple tarps.

          And when you first get to your site, and you set up your tents, you need to pitch a tarp shelter over your main cooking area. Should rain come, you can still have a fire, make some food, and sit around the fire without getting soaked.

          5. Pack clothes better, for you and the kids.

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            The worst thing is dirt and sand in your sleeping bag.

            The second worst thing is dirt and sand in your clothes—the “clean” ones you’re about to put on. This happens by Day 2 on most camping trips, when you or your kids have scrounged through the bag trying to find a pair of socks, scattering camp debris all over the bag and clothes while doing so.

            No fun.

            So pack clothes differently, as suggested by Rachel at KidsActivitiesBlog; put together an outfit for each day, roll it up with the smallest pieces on the inside (socks, underwear) and then secure each outfit roll with a rubber band. When it’s time to get dressed, pull out a roll and you’re set. Easy for kids, easy for adults, and keeps you from having to dig through a bag and get everything grimy. Plus, you’ll know if you have enough outfits! Bonus.

            6. Make starting a fire as easy as possible.

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              First, take plenty of matches, preferably the long kind.

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              Secondly, take a lighter because they’re way easier to use. Just have the matches for back-up.

              Thirdly, make these amazing little fire-starter things from stuff you would just be throwing away! Lint and used toilet paper rolls. Separately, just trash; put ’em together, and they’re portable packs of make-your-life-easier.

              7. Make coffee time as easy as possible with single-serve coffee packs.

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                I love this idea. Last time we went camping I took along my French Press and my tea kettle, and it worked out. But it was a little complicated and involved rinsing out the press often, which meant a lot of water jugs had to be refilled a lot more often.

                But this? This is simple. This is brilliance.

                Get your regular, basket coffee filters. Stick on in the bottom of a mug or measuring cup, spoon in 1–2 tablespoons of coffee, then pull the sides together and tie with twine or floss. Trim off the excess, because you don’t need a bunch of extra filter sticking out.

                Store the individual bags in a zip-top bag or air-tight container. When you’re ready for coffee, you just need boiling (or really, really hot) water. Put a bag in your mug, pour water over, and let sit for a few minutes. Use a spoon to get the bag out and discard, and your fresh, piping hot mug of coffee is ready for you with no dishes to wash.

                8. Make personal hygiene as easy as possible.

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                  Do you sense a theme here?

                  Easy is good. Simple is good. When you’re camping, complicated or multi-step or multi-tool requirements just mean more to bring, more to prep, and more to clean up.

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                  Start by making these little individual soap flakes with a regular bar of soap and a vegetable peeler. Store them in a bag or airtight container. Shower time? Pull one out, lather up, and then dispose of whatever remains, rather than trying to figure out what to do with a soggy, slimy bar of soap.

                  Take along a hanging bag to store your hygiene gear: you can use a half-size shoe organizer, a purse or small backpack, or one of those fancy organizer-type bags. It doesn’t really matter as long as it has a hook or other hanging mechanism on top. Pack all your toiletries and a washcloth in there, so you, your spouse, and kids can get clean without getting everything wet and gross from the questionable floor of the camp bathroom.

                  9. Set up a hand-washing station so your kids don’t get too gross.

                  camp9

                    The worst thing about kids and camping is dirt, germs, bug guts—stuff like that.

                    It’s a pain to hike to the nearest bathroom every time your kids need to clean their hands. Hand sanitizers are great, and so are moist wipes, but they don’t always cut it for messes like tree sap, marshmallow goo, or that unidentified brown smear…

                    So use your old laundry detergent bottle and set up a genuine hand-washing station. Easy, reusable (just refill the bottle) and simple enough for kids to use themselves.

                    10. Plan a couple of fun family activities.

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                      You don’t have to get fancy here. We are not about fancy, complicated things that require lots of work. Remember? We are about easy. Simple. And fun!

                      My kids have enjoyed a nature scavenger hunt. You don’t even have to prep ahead of time for this; just make up a list (“Uhhh, pine cone! Bird feather! Acorn!”) and go for it. Or you can prep by printing out a list (with or without pictures) and bringing it along.

                      There are plenty of other simple activities, as well, such as building an obstacle course, making a map of the area, or building a fort. None of those require any prep work; you just need to have the ideas in mind and pull them out for a fun afternoon or morning adventure.

                      Featured photo credit: Camping Tips and Hacks for Families via kidsactivitiesblog.com

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                      Last Updated on September 16, 2019

                      How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                      How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                      You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

                      We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

                      The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

                      Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

                      1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

                      Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

                      For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

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                      • (1) Research
                      • (2) Deciding the topic
                      • (3) Creating the outline
                      • (4) Drafting the content
                      • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
                      • (6) Revision
                      • (7) etc.

                      Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

                      2. Change Your Environment

                      Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

                      One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

                      3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

                      Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

                      Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

                      My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

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                      Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

                      4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

                      If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

                      Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

                      I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

                      5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

                      I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

                      Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

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                      As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

                      6. Get a Buddy

                      Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

                      I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

                      7. Tell Others About Your Goals

                      This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

                      For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

                      8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

                      What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

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                      9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

                      If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

                      Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

                      10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

                      Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

                      Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

                      11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

                      At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

                      Reality check:

                      I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future.  Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

                      More About Procrastination

                      Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

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