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These 20 Talented Young Photographers Will Inspire You

These 20 Talented Young Photographers Will Inspire You

Flickr has launched the first edition of their new photographer showcase project titled “20 Under 20,” a series dedicated to showcasing up-and-coming photographers on Flickr who are 20 years old or younger. Young and talented photographers from around the world are nominated by Flickr users and the top 20 are selected by a panel of judges to have their work featured on the site. Many of the winning nominees have already launched careers as freelance or artistic photographers, showing that age is no obstacle for true talent.

Check out the amazing work from these gifted young photographers below.

Evan Atwood

Evan Atwood’s work centers on conveying emotions through artistic self-portraits that play with light, shadow, and nature. Each photo captures a moment in time that draws you in with expertly-crafted focusing and blurring.

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    Rachel Baran

    Fine art photographer Rachel Baran, another self-portrait enthusiast, has quickly gained recognition for her creative conceptual work. Despite having no formal training in photography, Baran’s natural eye for composition has earned her significant appreciation in the art photography world.

    Olivia Bee

    Olivia Bee is a Portland-born photographer based in New York who has done portraits and other photographic work for a number of big-name clients including The New York Times Magazine, Converse, Nike, Harper’s Bazaar, and Vogue.com. Her subject matter is often artistic interpretations of everyday life or dreamy memories both real and imagined.

    Alex Benetel

    Australian photographer Alex Benetel has had commissions from names such as Harper’s Bazaar and has showcased her work in Australian galleries. She has taken inspiration from trips abroad as well as her own imagination to create dreamlike scenes in her work.

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    Oliver Charles

    Oliver Charles has been interested in photography since a young age, and has since branched out to explore digital composition in his work. His editing skills allow him to create dark and emotional images in surreal scenery, evoking a troubled dreamlike state.

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      Alex Currie

      Alex Currie is both a photographer and filmmaker, a fact which shows in his ability to capture a story in one photograph. Currie’s work is often meant to make a strong emotional connection with the viewer.

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        Silvia Grav

        Silvia Grav is an artist and photographer who left art school to pursue and improve her photography. Her work is dark and raw, with almost horror-like themes to it at times, and draws on strong emotional elements.

        Zev Hoover

        Zev Hoover sues photography to capture stunning images of expansive space and loneliness. He has had his photography featured in numerous publications and exhibits, and has even had a BBC documentary on his work. He even designs and builds foam-board remote-control airplanes which he attaches cameras to.

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          Katharina Jung

          German-born Katharina Jung is a fine art and portrait photographer with a flair for stark conceptual scenes. Much of her work is inspired by her daydreams and travel.

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            Lissy Laricchia

            Lissy Laricchia enjoys capturing whimsical or childlike images in warm, soft tones. She has had her work featured in numerous magazines and book/album covers, as well as artistic photography exhibits.

            Brian Oldham

            Los Angeles native Brian Oldham is a fine art photographer with a talent for imagining reality-bending surreal scenes in his images. Many of his photographs play with gravity and body parts while maintaining realistic backgrounds that make you look twice at his subjects.

            Laurence Philomene

            Laurence Philomene is has been taking photographs since she was 14 and has since cultivated a soft, almost pastel quality to much of her photographs. She often photographs people or scenes which portray femininity and concepts of gender.

            Greg Ponthus

            Greg Ponthus uses photography to play with lens focus and color, creating beautiful images that draw you in. He takes inspiration from the hazy countryside he grew up in.

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              Berta Vicente Salas

              Berta Vicente is a Spanish photographer and has been taking photos since the age of 14, retaining a fondness for portraiture. She explores portraits with lightly conceptual themes and creative angles.

              Nicholas Scarpinato

              Nicholas Scarpinato is a trained painter and sculptor who is also passionate about photography and film. His artistic eye can be seen clearly in his scene layouts and stylistic choices, creating stunning results.

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                Alex Stoddard

                Drawing on inspiration from his childhood in America’s deep south, Alex Stoddard creates intense, gothic imagery in his photographs. He often draws upon fairy-tales and classic narratives for both his visuals and message.

                David Uzochukwu

                David Uzochukwu is an Austrian-born photographer who has been taking pictures since the age of just 10 years old. His passion for fine art photography as well as self-portraits creates beautifully intimate images.

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                Chrissie White

                Chrissie White is a photographer from Seattle who is always searching for magic in the nature that surrounds us all. Her childhood was spent exploring snow-covered mountains and sailing through the glittering sea, which has greatly influenced her passion for adventure. When she isn’t seeing new places, she likes to dream of faraway worlds where anything is possible.

                wiissa

                Vanessa and Wilson are a photography duo who make up ‘wiissa’, their collaborative photography name. The two shoot exclusively with film and play with both vibrant and soft colors and creative poses in their work.

                Lauren Withrow

                Lauren Withrow grew up in a small Texas town which has inspired her photography since she took up the craft. Her work focuses on using space and experimenting with darker lighting, as well as portraits inspired by small town life.

                Featured photo credit: flipside/Katharina Jung via flic.kr

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                Last Updated on September 16, 2019

                How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

                We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

                The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

                Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

                1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

                Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

                For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

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                • (1) Research
                • (2) Deciding the topic
                • (3) Creating the outline
                • (4) Drafting the content
                • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
                • (6) Revision
                • (7) etc.

                Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

                2. Change Your Environment

                Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

                One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

                3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

                Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

                Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

                My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

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                Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

                4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

                If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

                Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

                I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

                5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

                I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

                Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

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                As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

                6. Get a Buddy

                Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

                I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

                7. Tell Others About Your Goals

                This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

                For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

                8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

                What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

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                9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

                If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

                Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

                10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

                Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

                Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

                11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

                At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

                Reality check:

                I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future.  Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

                More About Procrastination

                Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

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