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The Truth About Work/Life Balance

The Truth About Work/Life Balance

In recent weeks, various politicians in Great Britain and elsewhere have suddenly discovered the importance of work/life balance. It’s hard not to feel cynical. When politicians jump on an issue, you can usually be certain it’s something they think will win them credit with jaded voters. The media have also been turning the issue into a bandwagon, with articles in newspapers and magazines from Los Angeles to Kuala Lumpur.

What all these “conversions” have in common is a superficial view of work/life balance — one that limits it to neat, structural issues like flexible working hours and support for working women bringing up families. Rather than look closely at the real reasons why people are feeling disillusioned with working life (the long hours, constant overwork, increasing pressure, bullying bosses, continual restructuring and cutbacks), they turn to feel-good ideas that don’t need them to alter their attitudes or question past decisions. (Don’t get me wrong. These are important issues that badly need attention, but they don’t get near the fundamental questions of true work/life balance.)

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It’s depressingly predictable. Remember when organizations jumped on the “let’s have a compelling corporate vision” bandwagon? And how that became little more than grand-sounding words, composed by committee and posted on the wall of the lobby? It’s the same with work/life balance. Too many organizations are going through the motions of tackling the issues, delegating it to the HR department and pointing to nice, shiny-new policy statements, instead of instituting significant change.

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Problems with the balance between the demands of profit-driven corporations and peoples’ need to live a satisfying life won’t be cured by policy statements and procedure manuals. That isn’t where the causes lie. They’re inside peoples’ heads: obsessive achievement drive, ambition gone mad, laughable greed for money and power, and blithe disregard of anything not linked to short-term results. Macho, “grab ‘n go” bosses don’t treat underlings like cattle to be milked of every ounce of effort because they’ve selected incorrect HR policies. They do it because they have dysfunctional values and massively over-inflated egos.

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Work/life balance is an issue of civilization. It’s driven by simplistic, financially-derived goals, an unthinking ideology of “winner takes all,” and contempt for those unable to keep up. It’s the result of achievement motivation run wild. Until executives (and wannabe executives) realize they’ve created a monster that’s out of control — one that will eventually devour their lives and health too — no amount of policy-writing will make any difference.

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Adrian Savage is a writer, an Englishman and a retired business executive. He lives in Tucson, Arizona. You can read his serious thoughts most days at Slow Leadership, the site for everyone who wants to bring back the taste, zest and satisfaction to leadership; and his crazier ones at The Coyote Within.

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Last Updated on June 19, 2019

How to Practice Positive Meditation in 2 Simple Steps

How to Practice Positive Meditation in 2 Simple Steps

Just by simply spending some effort and time, staying positive every day can be easily achieved. All that is required is a fraction of your time, 10-15 minutes a day to cultivate the positive you!

But first, what is really positive thinking? Do you have to be in an upbeat, cheerful and enthusiastic mood all day to be positive minded?

No. Positive thinking simply means the absence of negative thoughts and emotions – in other words, inner peace!

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When you are truly at peace within yourself, you are naturally thinking positively. You don’t have to fight off negative thoughts, or search desperately for more positive thoughts. It just happens on its own. And here are 2 positive thinking meditation tips to empower you:

1. Relax as You Meditate

A powerful, simple yet rarely used technique is meditation. Meditation doesn’t have to take the form of static body posture. It can be as simple as sitting in a comfortable chair listening to soothing music. Or performing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing exercises.

Meditation is all about letting go of stressful or worrisome thoughts. That’s it! If you spend just a few minutes per day feeling relaxed and peaceful, you automatically shift your mind into a more positive place. When you FEEL more relaxed, you naturally THINK more positively!

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Start with a short period of time, like 5 or 10 minutes a day. You can meditate first thing in the morning, during your lunch break, right before you go to bed at night, or any time. The most important thing is to consciously let go of unproductive thoughts and feelings. Just let them go for those few minutes, and you may decide not to pick them back up again at all!

2. Practice Daily Affirmations

Positive affirmations can be used throughout the day anywhere and at anytime you need them, the more you use them the easier positive thoughts will take over negative ones and you will see benefits happening in your life.

What are affirmations? Affirmations are statements that are used in a positive present tense language. For example, “Every day, in every way, I’m getting better, better and better” is a popular affirmation used by the late Norman Vincent Peale.

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So how does one go about using positive affirmations in everyday life? Let’s look at some guidelines to follow when reciting your daily affirmations.

  1. Use first person pronouns in your message (I)
  2. Use present tense (I have)
  3. Use positive messages (I am happy)
  4. Repeat your affirmations on a consistent basis

Affirmations have to be said with conviction and consistency. Start your day by saying your affirmations out loud. It wouldn’t take more than 5 minutes to repeat your affirmations; yet when done consistently, these positive affirmations will seep into the subconscious mind to cultivate the new positive you.

Here’s an example of a “success affirmation” you can use on a daily basis:

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I am successful in everything I do. Every venture I get into returns wealth to me. I am constantly productive. I always perform to the full potential I have and have respect for my abilities.
My work is always given positive recognition. I augment my income constantly. I always have adequate money for everything I require. I spend my money prudently always. My work is always rewarded.

You can find more examples here: 10 Positive Affirmations for Success that will Change your Life

Remember, affirmations work on the basis of conviction and consistency. Do yourself a favor and make a commitment to see this through.

Begin practicing these positive thinking tips right now. And I wish you continued empowerment and growth on your positive thinking journey.

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Featured photo credit: Jacob Townsend via unsplash.com

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