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The 20 Most Livable Suburbs In America

The 20 Most Livable Suburbs In America

Recently, Lifehack came out with the Top 25 Best Neighborhoods For Millennials. Today, we have another interesting list. This one features the most livable suburbs in America. And to make things even sweeter, we’ll give you an additional bonus: a list of DIY options on how to move to one of them. Neat, right? Now, regarding the suburbs, after studying data on almost 300 of them, we put together a list of the top 20 suburbs in America. We examined those with populations between 5,000 and 100,000 within 40 kilometers of the nearest urban area. We then factored in the average commute time, median household income, poverty and crime rates, public school ratings from GreatSchools.org, and a measure of housing affordability.

Montgomery, Ohio

montgomery_01
    Google Maps

    Why is Montgomery a great choice? Let me enumerate them: Low cost of  living, low crime rates, and excellent schools. Just 22.6 minutes away from Cincinnati, its population has an average household income of $109,799. Add to these, seasonal arts series is held there to spice things up for the residents. Population is 10,251 and Great Shools score is 9.

    Leawood, Kansas

    Leawood_resized
      Google Maps

      In our list, it has the fourth-highest median income at $134,242. Leawood has a population of 31,867. It’s much bigger than Montgomery, yet it has low crime rates. Your kids will love it here because it has great schools with a Great Schools score of 9. At its borders are 3 cities, with Kansas as the largest and can be reached in a 20.1-minute drive.

      Dublin, Ohio

      dublin
        Google Maps

        Dublin, having a population of 41,751, is one of the larger suburbs included in our list. It has a low-cost place, yet it boasts of a high quality of life. Downtown Columbus is just 22.1 minutes away from this suburb. Dublin’s average household income is $114,183 and houses Muirfield Village Golf Club; a famous golf course in the America. Talking about education, it has a score of 8.67 from Great Schools.

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        Brandon, South Dakota

        Brandon
          Google Maps

          Brandon’s Population is 8,785 with a score of 9 given by Great Schools. Only 18 minutes away from the Sioux Falls area, it boasts of a median household income of $66,766. Even if this town has a surprisingly high poverty rate (4.3%) compared to the other places in this list, it has an extremely low violent-crime rate.

          Northville, Michigan

          NorthvilleMichiganDowntown1
            Wikipedia

            Scoring 10 on Great Schools rating scale, Northville is a great place for new families with kids. It has a population of 5,970 which is a lot lower than Brandon. Because of its distinct location (it’s atop rolling hills in a predominantly sandy and flat area, it’s given the nickname “Switzerland of Wayne County”. It’s a stone’s throwaway from Detroit-Warren-Dearborn area. A 21-minute drive and its household average income is $88,237.

            Grandview Heights, Ohio

            Grandview heights
              Google Maps

              Grandview Heights, home to 45 acres of parklands, has a median household income of $80,729. It has a population of 6,536 and scores an 8 on Great Schools rating board. Grandview Heights is a 17-minute drive from Columbus, Ohio. making it the shortest on our list.

              Germantown, Tennessee

              germantown
                Google Maps

                With its population at 38,844, Germantown is one of the largest on the list in terms of number of residents. Great Schools give it a score of 10. Predominantly ruled by retail and commercial service industries, Germantown prides itself with a high median household income of $114,520. Commute time is short; just 20 minutes from the greater Memphis area.

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                Carmel, Indiana

                Carmel-City-Center_resized
                  CarmelCityCenter.com

                  Carmel is well known for its famous Fourth of July weekend festival CarmelFest. This beautiful town is 25 minutes away from Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson metro. It has a population of 79, 191 and has a Great Schools score of 10. The average household income is $107,505, and more than 80% of homeowners spend 30% or less of their income on expenses relating to housing.

                  Fox Point, Wisconsin

                  foxpoint
                    Google Maps

                    This charming village located along Lake Michigan is a 21-minute drive from the Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis area and has an astonishing violent-crime rate of 0%. Average household income is $102,552. Fox Point’s Great Schools score is 9 and has a population of 6,701.

                    Springboro, Ohio

                    10-springboro-ohio
                      Wikimedia Commons

                      A population of 17,409 and a Great Schools score of 9, Springboro boasts of big-city amenities yet still feels like a small town. It has an average household income of  $95,406 and a short commute at around 22 minutes from Cincinnati.

                      Huntington Woods, Michigan

                      18-huntington-woods-michigan
                        Facebook/Huntington Woods, MI

                        It’s consistently ranked as one of the top suburbs in America. Residents of the city (situated 20 minutes outside of the Detroit-Warren-Dearborn metro area) brag about their low costs of living and pockets a median income of $112,593 annually. With a small population of 6,238, Huntington Woods is a nice place to live and gets a score of 6 from Great Schools.

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                        Beverly Hills, Michigan

                        20-beverly-hills-michigan
                          Facebook/Village of Beverly Hills

                          Michigan, at 0.5%, has the second-lowest poverty rate on this list. The town encourages a strong sense of community by having regular town celebrations including Halloween Hoot. Its 10,267 population has a median household income of $104,951 and a Great Schools score of 10. Located 21.9 minutes outside of the Detroit-Warren-Dearborn area, it’s a super-easy commute.

                          Signal Mountain, Tennessee

                          11-signal-mountain-tennessee
                            Facebook/Mountain Arts Community Center (MACC)

                            With a population of 7,554 and a Great Schools score of 9, Signal Mountain is a good place to live. The place got its name from a promontory of land known as Signal Point and is overlooking the Tennessee River Gorge. It is near Chattanooga, a city just 22 minutes away. Average household income is $81,302.

                            Powell, Ohio

                            Powell
                              Google Maps/The Mitchell House of Powell

                              A 25-minute drive from Columbus, the state capital of Ohio is a small city called Powell. This city was founded in 1801. With a population of 11, 500, it has a Great Schools score of 10. Even if it’s a small place, Powell prides itself on having the fourth-highest average household income on the list. The income is $ 133, 133.    

                              Villa Hills, Kentucky

                              7-villa-hills-kentucky
                                Facebook/City-of-Villa-Hills-Kentucky

                                It only took fifty years to convert Villa Hills from a farmland to a quiet suburb. The standard commute time to Cincinnati is 22 minutes; a short ride. The residents have a median household income of $87,342. The place has a 7, 489 population and a score of 7 from Great Schools.

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                                Mequon, Wisconsin

                                23-mequon-wisconsin
                                  Freekee/Wikimedia

                                  Situated on the shores of Lake Michigan, Mequon prides itself with pretty Lakeshore bluffs and lots of outdoor recreation areas. The  metro of Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis is just around 22 minutes away from Mequon and it scored high on Great Schools; a 10. Mequon has a population of 23, 132 with an average household income of $106, 733.

                                  Zionsville, Indiana

                                  Zionsville
                                    Google Maps

                                    Zionsville, the second-best US suburb has an ideal environment for raising families. Just under fifty percent of households are raising children below 18 years old. It’s located 23 minutes away from the metro of Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson. Here, nearly 80% of homeowners spend less than one-third of their income on housing expenses. Zionsville has a population of 14, 160 and has a Great Schools score of 10. The residents enjoy an average household income of $104,455.

                                    Mountain Brook, Alabama

                                    Mountain brook
                                      Mountain brookGoogle Maps

                                      Although Mountain Brook is just 17 minutes away from Birmingham-Hoover metro, we can’t see why you’d feel the desire to leave it. With an average income of $135,833, the nice community has its own school system, boast of five distinctly attractive shopping villages, and residential spaces beautifully designed by Warren Manning — the landscape planner responsible for creating New York’s Central Park. Regarding education, it garnered a score of 10 from Great Schools. Its population totals 20,413.

                                      Wyoming, Ohio

                                      wyoming-ohio
                                        Wikimedia/Margee Moore

                                        Wyoming, with a population of 8,428, has a tight-knit kind of folks and they form a community that takes home an average household income of $95,572. This town has top-notch schools scoring a 10 from Great Schools and is just a 21-minute drive from Cincinnati.

                                        Elm Grove, Wisconsin

                                        elm groove
                                          Google Maps

                                          This spectacular suburb has it all: low poverty and violent crime rates, exceptional schools (Great Schools score of 10), and a six-figure average income ($109,933). The populace, a total of 5,934, can access the downtown Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis area in just about 20 minutes, or get away from the hustle and bustle of the city at the village’s refuge of nature. This haven is a designated “Bird City,” a distinction awarded to places committed to maintaining communities a great place for people, birds, and other wildlife.

                                          Featured photo credit: Elm Groove, Wisconsin/Google Earth.com via google.com

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                                          Anthony Dejolde

                                          TV/Radio personality who educates his audience on entrepreneurship, productivity, and leadership.

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                                          Last Updated on September 16, 2019

                                          How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                                          How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                                          You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

                                          We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

                                          The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

                                          Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

                                          1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

                                          Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

                                          For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

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                                          • (1) Research
                                          • (2) Deciding the topic
                                          • (3) Creating the outline
                                          • (4) Drafting the content
                                          • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
                                          • (6) Revision
                                          • (7) etc.

                                          Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

                                          2. Change Your Environment

                                          Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

                                          One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

                                          3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

                                          Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

                                          Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

                                          My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

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                                          Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

                                          4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

                                          If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

                                          Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

                                          I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

                                          5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

                                          I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

                                          Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

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                                          As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

                                          6. Get a Buddy

                                          Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

                                          I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

                                          7. Tell Others About Your Goals

                                          This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

                                          For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

                                          8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

                                          What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

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                                          9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

                                          If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

                                          Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

                                          10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

                                          Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

                                          Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

                                          11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

                                          At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

                                          Reality check:

                                          I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future.  Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

                                          More About Procrastination

                                          Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

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