Advertising
Advertising

How To Become a Spontaneous Explorer of the World: The 7 Amusing Steps

How To Become a Spontaneous Explorer of the World: The 7 Amusing Steps

header_Maptia

    Ever since I was a little boy, I have always wanted to roam around and explore the world. It’s still fresh in my memory like it just happened yesterday. I was reading my social studies book and looking at the pictures of all nations of the world and the pertinent information about them. A thorough description of their culture, the products they produce, their form of government, their predominant religion, their history, what they are known for in the global community, and other interesting facts. Because of my childish curiosity, on impulse, I developed an extreme desire to explore the world. In an instant, I became a spontaneous explorer. Ahead are the 7 steps to become a spontaneous explorer of the work originally published by Maptia.

    Below is the wonderful post.

    Greetings future explorer of the world! In this post we will be introducing you to Spontaneity and his mischievous cousin Serendipity have faithfully accompanied many great explorers throughout the ages and we can guarantee that befriending these two on the road is bound to lead to unexpected wayward adventures and happy coincidences.

    “Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes. Don’t resist them; that only creates sorrow. Let reality be reality. Let things flow naturally forward in whatever way they like.” — Lao Tzu

    * On an intriguing historical note, the word ‘serendipity’ was conceived entirely by accident. Back in 1754, the wonderfully named Mr. Horace Walpole recalled an old fairy tale of the ‘Three Persian Princes of Serendip’. According to Mr. Walpole ‘these brave Princes were always making discoveries, by accident and sagacity, of things which they were not in quest of…’

    Inspired by Guerrilla artist Keri Smith’s delightful book on ‘How To Be An Explorer of the World’ and also some of the wonderfully creative ideas listed in the Lonely Planet ‘Guide to Experimental Travel’, we have compiled a short, illustrated field guide with seven ideas that we hope will encourage you to succumb to your spontaneous urges, adopt a healthy caution against over-preparation, embrace serendipity, shed the heavy cloak of routine, chase down happenstance, and invite chance to be your chaperone as you follow in the of the three aforementioned Princes—Onward! ¡Vamos! Allons-y!

    spin-the-globe
      Advertising

      1 | Spin the Globe

      Guidelines

      The timeless ‘spin the globe’ technique is one of the most well known methods for inducing spontaneous travel and is wonderfully demonstrated by James McAvoy playing Dr. Nicholas Garrigan in the 2006 film ‘The Last King of Scotland’. Committing to travel the first place your finger lands on takes a whole lot of ‘cojones’, so for first timers we would recommend giving yourself three strikes— spins if you will—before committing yourself to actually to the country that your finger lands on.

      For added panache, we would suggest first pouring a glass of single malt whisky and spinning one of the rather hand-painted globes from the talented team at Bellerby & Co based in London, England.

      Tweet step #1 ‘Spin the Globe’

      trust-in

        2 | Put your trust in a furry companion

        Guidelines

        If you live in an urban area, either take your own dog or ask to borrow one from a friend. If however you are living in central Asia, perhaps you might consider commandeering a yak. In Western Africa? Try a camel. In the Australian bush? Jump on a kangaroo… you get the picture. Whichever your mammalian companion of choice—turn the tables and let it take you for a walk, you never know where you might end up!

        Tweet #2 ‘Put Your Trust in a Furry Companion’

        Advertising

        memory-lane

          3 | Flip a Coin and Take a Trip Down Memory Lane

          Guidelines

          This is one for the whole family and perhaps your elderly too. Politely ask them to dig around for an old coin (or equivalent out-dated coin depending on your homeland), perhaps a vintage travel guide (such as one) and if you really want to commit yourself, a vintage bicycle or Penny Farthing from an antique store—complete with a set of retro trouser clips.Once your intergenerational team has rounded itself up, set off down your local road at a moderate pace and at each junction take it in turns to flip your coin. Heads = go left. Tails = go right. Repeat this process for an afternoon and along the way ask each other about memories from each place or junction—what did these places look like 10 or even 20 years ago? What has changed and what has remained the same? Enjoy the leisurely ride down memory lane.

          Tweet step #3 ‘Flip a Coin and Take a Trip Down Memory Lane’

          embark-microadventure

            4 | Embark on a microadventure

            Guidelines

            Surely you’ve heard of Al Humphrey’s microadventures by now? His premise is simple—you do not need to fly to the other side of the planet to find wilderness and beauty—adventure is only a state of mind. Anyone can embark on a. Simply put the kettle on, pick up a map and find somewhere rural that you’ve never been to, despite it being close by.

            After work, jump on a train or cycle there. Sleep under the stars on a hilltop, swim in a river, wake up in the sunshine. Return to your desk, a few twigs in your hair but happy to the core.
            Tweet #4 ‘Embark on a Microadventure ’

            Advertising

            seek-confluence

              5 | Seek points of confluence

              Guidelines

              A point of confluence occurs at the integer degree intersections where a line of latitude meets a line of longitude. There is a confluence within 49 miles (79 km) of you if you’re on the surface of and there are 64,442 latitude and longitude degree intersections in the world (counting each pole as one intersection). Check out confluence.org to find out how many fall in your country.These confluences are interesting because they represent the randomness that emerges from strict order, they are an open defiance of the order our culture imposes on us. As author Tim Vasquez says, ‘[Points of confluence are] curious places that embrace you in their history, character, and ecology, surrounded by people who are locals in every sense of the word.’

              Tweet step #5 ‘Seek Points of Confluence’

              up-and-away

                6 | Up Up and Away

                Guidelines

                This idea was pioneered by the legendary Larry Walters whose spontaneous misadventures inspired the Pixar classic UP. We do not advise that anyone actually attempts this at home, but Larry’s story is so spectacular that we felt obliged to include it in this compendium. Larry was an American truck driver, who on July 2, 1982 took flight in a homemade airship named ‘Inspiration I’His beautiful ‘flying machine’ consisted of an ordinary patio chair with 45 helium-filled weather balloons attached. It was reported that Inspiration I rose to an altitude of over 15 thousand feet and floated from its take-off spot in San Pedro, California into controlled airspace near Los Angeles International Airport. Slightly safer alternatives to Larry’s method would include or attaching a GPS to a helium balloon and following it with your feet placed firmly on the ground.
                Tweet #6 ‘Up Up and Away’

                lucid-dream

                  7 | Teach yourself to lucid dream

                  Advertising

                  Guidelines

                  Lucid dreaming is simply being conscious that you are dreaming. Tibetan Buddhists have dream yoga for centuries and there is a lot of literature behind the art and science of lucid dreaming—we found the simplest methods outlined in a post here on the 4HWW blog. It requires a lot of practise to master lucid dreaming in the beginning, but once greater control has been developed you can use your normal hours of REM sleep to visit anywhere in the world.

                  Quit your 9-5 job to fly over the Egyptian pyramids on the back of a giant eagle—check. Explore the depths of the ocean reefs without an oxygen tank—check. Base jump from Mt. Everest with Barack Obama—check. As with most things in life the only limits are those imposed by your own imagination—have fun!
                  Tweet #7 ‘Teach Yourself to Lucid Dream’

                  Now, what are you waiting for… get out there and start spontaneously exploring the world!

                  Did you find a place that you didn’t know you were looking for? Did you have interesting conversations which you otherwise weren’t expecting or did you have an experience worth telling your friends about when you returned home? If the answer to any of these questions is a resounding ‘Yes’—then your flirtation with spontaneity was a success. If no then what are you waiting for—don’t plan to be spontaneous tomorrow.

                  Share these ideas with a spontaneous tweet and @mention a friend who might be inspired by these seven serendipity-inducing ideas. Do you have any other ideas for spontaneous travel? If you have tried any of the above, please do share your story with us in the comments below.

                  This post originally appeared over on the Maptia Blog; the team at Maptia have just launched their beautiful platform for telling stories about places. The illustrations were done by Ella Frances Sanders, Illustrator in Residence at Maptia.

                  Seven Steps to Becoming a Spontaneous Explorer of the World |  By Maptia, Co-founder Team 

                  More by this author

                  Anthony Dejolde

                  TV/Radio personality who educates his audience on entrepreneurship, productivity, and leadership.

                  Feeling Scattered? How to Organize Notes to Stay on Top of Things Drink Water At The Correct Time To Stay Healthy The Art of Tucking in Shirts every Gentleman Needs to Practice 10 Ways to Lace Up Your Shoes Creatively 25 Odd Jobs That Make Good Money

                  Trending in Leisure

                  1 5 Best Free Websites To Learn Photography Skills Easily 2 World’s 30 Coolest And Most Unusual Hostels You Definitely Need To Visit 3 Beauty Hacks: 25 Smooth Shaving Tips for Women 4 25 Best Self Improvement Books to Read No Matter How Old You Are 5 30 Inspirational Songs that Keep You Motivated for Life

                  Read Next

                  Advertising
                  Advertising
                  Advertising

                  Last Updated on September 16, 2019

                  How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                  How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

                  You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

                  We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

                  The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

                  Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

                  1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

                  Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

                  For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

                  Advertising

                  • (1) Research
                  • (2) Deciding the topic
                  • (3) Creating the outline
                  • (4) Drafting the content
                  • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
                  • (6) Revision
                  • (7) etc.

                  Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

                  2. Change Your Environment

                  Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

                  One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

                  3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

                  Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

                  Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

                  My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

                  Advertising

                  Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

                  4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

                  If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

                  Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

                  I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

                  5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

                  I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

                  Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

                  Advertising

                  As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

                  6. Get a Buddy

                  Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

                  I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

                  7. Tell Others About Your Goals

                  This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

                  For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

                  8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

                  What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

                  Advertising

                  9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

                  If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

                  Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

                  10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

                  Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

                  Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

                  11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

                  At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

                  Reality check:

                  I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future.  Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

                  More About Procrastination

                  Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

                  Read Next