Advertising
Advertising

Scientists Suggest That Improper Diet Can Cause Depression

Scientists Suggest That Improper Diet Can Cause Depression

Depression may occur due to an improper and unhealthy diet in many people, according to latest research. In recent years, scientist conducted a variety of studies on the potential relationship between depression and improper diets. They found that nutrition has an increased effect on the human body, as well as emotional states related to depression.

Naturally Combatting the Cause of Depression

According to recent studies, diets high in fats and sugars may be a factor that causes depression in many people. These types of diets contribute to emotional and biological changes in our minds and bodies.

When we eat poorly, our bodies become deprived of essential nutrients. The human body recognizes, reacts, and regards nutrient deficiencies as a potential disease. In turn, the body releases proteins known as cytokines to try to protect the body and fight off the perceived intruder.

This natural and vital protection process is similar to how the body’s immune system works when trying to heal a physical wound that may cause inflammation. The brain receives signals when inflammation is detected.

Advertising

Chronic and extended health problems can easily turn into depression because of the negative thoughts people get when triggered by an illness. Physicians refer to this as sickness behavior, which is surprisingly similar to depression, where people are unwilling to be productive, eat well, or get out of bed.

For example, The Washington Post covered a story that included Jodi Corbett, a 47-year-old battling depression for more than twenty years. Jodi initiated an experimental diet that she believes took her off antidepressants. Jodi said she stopped eating food products containing gluten. Gluten is a protein composite found in rye, barley, wheat, and related grains. It took only one month for Jodi to rid herself of her lifelong depression and lose several pounds.

“It was like a veil lifted and I could see life more clearly. It changed everything.”

She added more about her success.

Advertising

“This was such a simple solution. I could have saved myself a lot of money and a lot of misery if someone had asked about my diet 15 years ago. My life could have been different.”

Jodi Corbett’s example is just the tip of the iceberg many researchers are exploring when it comes to food’s impact on the mind. For years, scientists focused on the mind being the essential cause of depression; however, new research has uncovered the possibility that a healthy diet can play an instrumental part in relieving depression in most people.

Diets That Make a Difference

Big Think reported the findings of a study comparing a western diet that contains more sugars and fat, to the Mediterranean diet predominantly comprised of vegetables, oils, and nuts.

“Those who lived almost exclusively on the traditional Mediterranean diet were about half as likely to develop depression over the period as those eating more unhealthy food; even when you control for things like education and economic status.”

Michael Berk is a professor of psychiatry at the Deakin University School of Medicine in Australia. He offered an explanation to The Washington Post on how diets affect our mental health.

“Traditional diets, the kinds of foods your grandmother would have recognized, have been associated with a lower risk of mental health issues. There’s lots of hype about the Mediterranean diet [fruits, vegetables, whole grains, olive oil, nuts, fish] but the traditional Norwegian diet [fish, shellfish, game, root vegetables, dairy products, whole-wheat bread] and the traditional Japanese diet [fish, tofu, rice] appear to be just as protective.”

University of California in Los Angeles, clinical psychologist George Slavich has studied depression for years. When discussing causes of depression, Dr. Slavich sees the body having more precedence over the mind.

He says, “I don’t even talk about it as a psychiatric condition anymore. It does involve psychology, but it also involves equal parts of biology and physical health.”

Today, treating depression with healthier diets is becoming more common. For instance, the U.S. Department of Defense initiated a trial program that delivers nutrient rich foods to soldiers diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD, claiming eating a healthy diet has proven to be as effective as preventative mental health counseling in preventing depression.

Not everyone is completely onboard in citing the body over the mind when it comes to depression. As with most healthcare professional, Dr. Berk supports an integrative approach to treating mental illness, including added traditional treatments, exercise, as well as experimenting with diet modifications. With respect to depression, Dr. Berk offers more.

“For a mood disorder like depression, there are hundreds if not thousands of risk pathways that all contribute to the disorder. Targeting one factor doesn’t target all the factors that cause someone to develop depression. That’s why you need to develop an integrated package of care as the norm.”

Most people agree that healthy and nutritional diets should be included in an eclectic and holistic approach to treating depression.

Advertising

More by this author

George Zapo

Public Health

Banned Foods Around The World Americans Should Stop Eating These Banned Foods ASAP Repel Indoor Plant Pests 14 Ways To Avoid And Deal With Indoor Plant Pests Depression And Food Scientists Suggest That Improper Diet Can Cause Depression Diabetics Tatto Temporary Tattoo Instead Of Finger Prick For Diabetics Hazardous Household Chemicals Every Parent Should Avoid These Household Chemicals Which Lower Children’s IQ

Trending in Health

1 How to Find Weight Loss Meal Plans That Work for You 2 14 Healthy Easy Recipes for People on the Go 3 How to Manage Anxiety: Sound Advice from a Mental Health Expert 4 How to Start Eating Healthy No Matter How Old You Are 5 Understanding Intermittent Fasting Benefits: More Than Just Weight Loss

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

Advertising

3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Advertising

6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

Advertising

9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

Advertising

Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

Read Next