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Quicker Reboots – For Your Life

Quicker Reboots – For Your Life

Adam mentioned wanting a quicker reboot for his life. I gave this some thought, and here’s what I have for a premise: not unlike computers, the thing that slows down most reboots is sorting through everything. Where were things left when I shut down? What’s got to be done by which thingy when? That kind of stuff. Here are some potential hacks for quicker reboots:

  • Manage Threads Better- If you know and can easily reference who you owe WHAT in terms of time, deliverables, cash, and otherwise, it helps you reboot your life faster. For instance, if I wanted to “drop everything” right now, I’d have to stop working on my (soon to be too late) Father’s Day project, stop working on a picture refinishing project, kill my household tasks, stop writing for 5 or 6 blogs, etc, etc. Hack: Keep a running “thread” list, simply stating Item / Owner / Due by / Status. Make this list religious. Make it the PID table for your life. If it’s not on your threads, it doesn’t exist. Thus, if you have to reboot, you can send a “status” call to the folks who own the threads and try to “exit gracefully.”
  • Manage Power Better– You need energy and clarity of mind to keep your “human stack” running. That means good food, good rest cycles, proper circulation (exercise). If you don’t manage your meat-space, you start losing cycles to do as much work. A reboot will help clear this, but before you even have to come to that, having better processes to handle your power levels will stretch out the duration between reboots. Hack: start and build enduring, strong habits around eating on schedule (every 2-3 hours), exercising regularly (new guidelines: 60 minutes a day), and sleeping enough (officially 8 hours, but I’m guilty of far fewer hours). It will keep you head working better. If you don’t have enough time to do all that, look for threads to kill or defer. You can’t forever overclock or your system will just shut down on its own.
  • Improve Monitoring – Windows XP is far more explicit about problems than Windows 95 ever was. Linux and Mac users have fairly good instrumentation, should they choose to observe it. Without your threads document, you lack a process table (how busy you are). Without some kind of graphing (process monitor), you can’t be sure your history and running averages. You rely instead on anecdotal health checks and pings to determine if you’re too busy, too tired, too overworked. Hack: make simple graphs to track your progress (try Joe’s Goals, which we wrote about a week ago). Try to collect some sense of what you’ve been up to, so that you can predict or forecast how much more you can or can’t take on at any given time.
  • Defrag – Similar to my post on moving back into your house, reboots can be more and more difficult if we leave our “bits” all over the place. How organized are you? How cluttered is your workspace? (I know Adam’s answer, which will be another post). Besides my basic starting point of “reducing clutter and not bringing new clutter into your life is best,” it’s also important to manage where everything is kept. I don’t believe that whole “super creative people are messy by nature” thing (though a snapshot of my house right now might disagree). Instead, I believe that we often lack the proper supplies to collect and organize things better. Well, IKEA sells stuff cheaply. So do several other department stores. These things permit organization on gross levels for the first pass, and then you can work to reduce some of the “mess” in your life. Hack: set up monthly “can’t avoid” times to reset your house, your work space(s), your bags and backpacks – everything that holds parts of YOU.
  • Add Resources– Covey’s 7 Habits puts forth that it’s all well and good that you are independently capable and useful, but the real prize is in being able to use off-board resources (other people) via interdependence. Building up ways and systems to share the wealth of things in your life in such a way that you’re not 100% overseeing the work you’ve passed forward gives you a few extra cycles. In essence, it’s like adding extra CPUs or a video card. You’re spreading the load by sharing out work. (Leon’s spread the load of Lifehack.org posting by giving me a logon here). Hack: learn how to build processes and projects in such a way that you can “farm them out” or share them with others. This means that even if you have to reboot, those processes that aren’t 100% yours might stay up and keep running while you reboot.

So are these hacks or tips? Are they workarounds to existing processes or optimizations? I don’t quibble with the terminology. I just want them to be useful to you. Does any of that ring true to you? Can you see how the extended analogy of examining at least the “functional” parts of our life as if they were computer bits might give us new perspective on getting things done? Your thoughts, feedback, add-ons to the premise, would all be greatly appreciated.

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

How to Stay Calm and Cool When You Are Extremely Stressful

How to Stay Calm and Cool When You Are Extremely Stressful

Being in a hurry all the time drains your energy. Your work and routine life make you feel overwhelmed. Getting caught up in things beyond your control stresses you out…

If you’d like to stay calm and cool in stressful situations, put the following 8 steps into practice:

1. Breathe

The next time you’re faced with a stressful situation that makes you want to hurry, stop what you’re doing for one minute and perform the following steps:

  • Take five deep breaths in and out (your belly should come forward with each inhale).
  • Imagine all that stress leaving your body with each exhale.
  • Smile. Fake it if you have to. It’s pretty hard to stay grumpy with a goofy grin on your face.

Feel free to repeat the above steps every few hours at work or home if you need to.

2. Loosen up

After your breathing session, perform a quick body scan to identify any areas that are tight or tense. Clenched jaw? Rounded shoulders? Anything else that isn’t at ease?

Gently touch or massage any of your body parts that are under tension to encourage total relaxation. It might help to imagine you’re in a place that calms you: a beach, hot tub, or nature trail, for example.

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3. Chew slowly

Slow down at the dinner table if you want to learn to be patient and lose weight. Shoveling your food down as fast as you can is a surefire way to eat more than you need to (and find yourself with a bellyache).

Be a mindful eater who pays attention to the taste, texture, and aroma of every dish. Chew slowly while you try to guess all of the ingredients that were used to prepare your dish.

Chewing slowly will also reduce those dreadful late-night cravings that sneak up on you after work.

4. Let go

Cliche as it sounds, it’s very effective.

The thing that seems like the end of the world right now?

It’s not. Promise.

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Stressing and worrying about the situation you’re in won’t do any good because you’re already in it, so just let it go.

Letting go isn’t easy, so here’s a guide to help you:

21 Things To Do When You Find It Hard To Let Go

5. Enjoy the journey

Focusing on the end result can quickly become exhausting. Chasing a bold, audacious goal that’s going to require a lot of time and patience? Split it into several mini-goals so you’ll have several causes for celebration.

Stop focusing on the negative thoughts. Giving yourself consistent positive feedback will help you grow patience, stay encouraged, and find more joy in the process of achieving your goals.

6. Look at the big picture

The next time you find your stress level skyrocketing, take a deep breath, and ask yourself:

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Will this matter to me…

  • Next week?
  • Next month?
  • Next year?
  • In 10 years?

Hint: No, it won’t.

I bet most of the stuff that stresses you wouldn’t matter the next week, maybe not even the next day.

Stop agonizing over things you can’t control because you’re only hurting yourself.

7. Stop demanding perfection of yourself

You’re not perfect and that’s okay. Show me a person who claims to be perfect and I’ll show you a dirty liar.

Demanding perfection of yourself (or anybody else) will only stress you out because it just isn’t possible.

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8. Practice patience every day

Below are a few easy ways you can practice patience every day, increasing your ability to remain calm and cool in times of stress:

  • The next time you go to the grocery store, get in the longest line.
  • Instead of going through the drive-thru at your bank, go inside.
  • Take a long walk through a secluded park or trail.

Final thoughts

Staying calm in stressful situations is possible, all you need is some daily practice.

Taking deep breaths and eat mindfully are some simple ways to train your brain to be more patient. But changing the way you think of a situation and staying positive are most important in keeping cool whenever you feel overwhelmed and stressful.

Featured photo credit: Brooke Cagle via unsplash.com

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