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How Failures Can Teach You Valuable Lessons

How Failures Can Teach You Valuable Lessons

ski skiing failure success lessons

    Some of the toughest lessons that we face are from our failures. But it’s also these same failures that can provide the most useful lessons if we only allow them to be. I’m going to be brave to share with you one of the biggest failures and resulting lessons from my own life.

    In 1990, I became certified as a Level 1 ski instructor by the Canadian Ski Instructors Alliance, which is the governing body for professional ski instructors here in Canada. I always wanted to become a Level 2 instructor. The abilities of a Level 2 ski instructor is considered to be a very respectable skiing level. So after a few years as a Level 1, I decided to take the Level 2 certification course.

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    The Level 2 ski instructor course turned out to be the most grueling course I have ever taken, as it was an intensive five-day program with both on snow and indoor sessions. The course conductors who were Level 4 instructors, were constantly evaluating us. Level 4s are considered ski gods here in Canada.

    Once the course started, I quickly found that my ski technique on the ‘black diamond’ slopes, which are the steep ones, was not quite up to Level 2 standards. Also, my short radius turns were not considered strong enough. So as a result of these two weaknesses, I ended up failing the course.

    Using Failure As A Good Teacher

    Needless to say, I was quite disappointed for failing but the experience also taught me what I needed to work on. It clearly told me that if I ever wanted to become a Level 2 ski instructor, I would have to really work on my weaknesses.

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    For the next entire ski season, I made it my main objective to specifically train intensively on my weaknesses, which were skiing on the steep black diamond slopes and doing short radius turns. I forced myself to work on just these two techniques during my 3 to 4 ski days each week all winter long. By the following season, I was ready to retake the Level 2 course.

    The retest was at a bigger ski resort compared to where I took the course during my first time around and this resulted in further unexpected challenges. This bigger resort not only has black diamond slopes but also has ‘double black diamonds’. These particular slopes are even steeper than the single black diamonds.

    There was this double black diamond slope called ‘Elevator Shaft’, the steepest at the resort. You can just imagine how steep it is just from its name. None of the Level 2 candidates taking the course thought that we would actually have to ski down ‘Elevator Shaft’ in front of the course conductors. Guess what happened?

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    Sure enough, they made us ski down ‘Elevator Shaft’ as part of our test not just once, but three times in a row! This was probably one of the most nerve-racking experiences I have ever gone through. It’s one thing to ski down the steepest double black diamond there, but to do it in front of the course conductors – well, you can imagine the intense anxiety we all felt.

    Success Finally Comes After Failure

    At the end of my retest, I was told that I actually skied well enough to finally pass the Level 2 program. The intensive training that I put into from the entire last season paid off and I wouldn’t have gone through that specific training if I hadn’t failed the Level 2 course the first time around.

    My initial failure taught me where my weaknesses were as well as how to train to overcome them. This same process of using failure to be an effective teaching tool can be applied to almost any area in life. If you want to achieve a higher level in pretty well any specific area or skill, be prepared to accept failures.

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    As disappointing as they may be, have the bravery to learn from these failures and actively apply the valuable lessons from them. By doing this, success will eventually come.

    If you have experienced failure before becoming successful in something, please feel free to share below in the comments section.

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    Last Updated on June 13, 2019

    5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

    5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

    Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

    You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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    1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

    It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

    Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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    2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

    If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

    3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

    If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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    4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

    A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

    5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

    If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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    Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

    Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

    Reference

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