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Imagination: The Best Gift You Can Give Yourself for 2013

Imagination: The Best Gift You Can Give Yourself for 2013

2013 promises to be an interesting year, and of course we all want to have an enjoyable and successful one…  so how can we go about creating a wonderful year for ourselves?

Create Inner Freedom

The best way to improve your life is to create some inner freedom.

Inner freedom is the ability to be flexible and adaptive in the face of changing circumstances, and we certainly have plenty of those! This inner freedom allows you to:

  • Have a more unstructured and open view of both present and future
  • Acknowledge your present reality and still be open to other possibilities at the same time
  • Have a creative frame of mind
  • See your creativity rather than your circumstances as the primary factor in your life
  • Be more sophisticated by inviting all possibilities to the table of your life

How We Lose Our Inner Freedom

Our preconceived ideas tend to render us predisposed to a particular expectation or experience. These learned ideas about life can cause us to define “reality” in such a way that we may temper our ambitions, desires, and most importantly, our sense of possibility. Often, our experiences lead us to a set of assumptions that foreclose possibilities, creating a closed-memory system that causes us to give up an important part of our minds: our imagination.

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Imagination can seem like feeble competition for one’s memory, which builds its catalogue of events over time, defining what we perceive reality to be. When that happens, we have given our memories power over our lives when life is meant to be created anew each and every moment.

Are you letting this happen?

Are your past memories running the show of your life?

Do you fear a repetition of disappointments stored in your memory?

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Are your memories limiting your sense of possibility?

The Emotional Overhead of Our Memories

The human memory has its value, but can be one of the most limiting forces in our lives.

We could learn a great deal from animals, who do not live in their memories, but in the present. Many animals, even if they have suffered serious abuse, will recover and leave the past behind in favor of a more joyful present and future. We humans are often less flexible, usually because of our memories.

Our memories—which are tied to a nonexistent set of circumstances—can cause diminished expectations, which in turn can affect how we operate in the present. If I believe that I “do not stand a chance” in regard to a specific situation, my interest in it diminishes, as does my motivation. Now my chances are really gone.

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These beliefs are often based on a memory which caused you to have the expectation of failure before you even began, which is why beliefs and memories need to be reexamined. When people pump themselves up it is often to counter the effects of their memories’ hold on their expectations. Our memory provides us with a lot of emotional overhead that has to be either dealt with or maintained—like a hidden tax on our energies that we are often not aware of.

How about taking the emotional load off?

The Gift of Imagination

Our imagination lets us have a playful attitude toward the present that can let us solve serious problems more easily.

Embracing our imaginations and whatever possibilities exist in the present is not about pumping ourselves up to face another day, or challenging ourselves to do the impossible. It is not about proving ourselves or denying whatever harm we have experienced in the past.

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Our imaginations:

  • Encourage us to consider the unknown when we are looking for solutions to problems
  • Let us see the history of the human race as a continual growth and learning process where we work with current circumstances to create something that was not there before
  • Allow us to see ourselves as part of the creative evolutionary process of the human race
  • Make it easier to commit to the long-term because we can have a more relaxed and playful perspective

So much of existing human infrastructure and achievements are a testimonial to the triumph of the imagination over memory, which is often riddled with fear.

What a great legacy we have to work from, and reminds us what a courageous bunch we are!

To a Great 2013

I suggest that you accept your memory as only one influential factor in your life: let it have its voice without letting it have the last word; let your imagination out to play as well, and help others to do the same.

Featured photo credit:  Fantasy surrealistic background with an elephant with a hat via Shutterstock

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Maria Hill

Maria Hill is the owner of Sensitive Evolution, an online platform dedicated to improving the lives of highly sensitive people.

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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