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How to Whiten Teeth without Seeing a Dentist

How to Whiten Teeth without Seeing a Dentist

A healthy smile can make you feel great and boost your confidence. Unfortunately, lifestyle choices such as what we choose to eat and drink, and how we look after our teeth can, over time, create a smile we are less than happy with. Our teeth naturally age, the enamel gets thinner, and the dentine layer underneath gets darker, which all adds to the teeth being less white than would be liked and can make us look older than we are. A visit to a specialist can help restore the whiteness but at a price. Fortunately there are ways to maintain and restore the brightness of your smile at home, without visiting the dentist.

How to Whiten Teeth without Seeing a Dentist

Brushing and flossing

Keep teeth brushed and flossed clean to prevent staining and tooth decay which both contribute to discoloration. Always wait for 30 minutes to an hour after eating before brushing teeth. The acids in food soften the enamel, which takes a while to recover. Brushing too soon after eating will be too abrasive on the softened enamel and will cause damage, as well as creating a surface more easily stained.

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Rinse with water

Rinse with water after eating to remove the sugars and acids that cause damage. Remnants of foods will break down in the mouth releasing the sugars and acids that cause damage and discoloration to teeth. Rinsing the mouth will physically remove these.

Chew gum and avoid dehydration

Chew gum to stimulate the production of saliva. The bodies natural defense, it helps reduce the levels of acid and harmful bacteria in the mouth. Drink plenty of fluids to stay hydrated and prevent a dry mouth and lower amounts of saliva.

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Limit certain foods

Avoid staining by limiting the amount of foods that are likely to cause stains, such as tomato sauce and balsamic vinegar. Tannins in tea and coffee, also found in red wine, stick to the tooth enamel, causing an unsightly staining that is harder to remove. Try limiting the amount you drink, and choose tea and coffee with milk rather than black, and drink white wine rather than red. Limit the amount of sugary drinks such as sodas, and using a straw when drinking them will help limit their damage to your teeth by bypassing them altogether. Eat more crunchy foods, such as raw carrots and celery, that will work at clearing away bits stuck to your teeth, effectively gently scraping your teeth as you eat them.

Eat dairy products

Dairy products are high in calcium which is essential for strong bones and teeth and helps prevent bone loss. The lactic acid in dairy products helps strengthen enamel and prevent decay, and the fat found in cheese helps prevent bacteria bonding to teeth.

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Stop smoking

Smoking not only stains the teeth, it affects the immune system and causes gum disease which can lead to bone and tooth loss. Whitening teeth will be counterproductive if smoking is continued and should be considered a vital first step in better oral health and a healthier smile.

Home whitening methods

Strawberries and apples

Strawberries contain malic acid which has been shown to prevent and remove stains. There are various ways of using strawberries, such as slicing and rubbing on your teeth or crushing them up and adding to baking soda to form a paste. Apples also contain malic acid and act as a gentle abrasive when eaten. As both contain fruit acids, that can soften enamel and cause decay, it’s important to rinse with water after using, and limit the use of baking soda as in the instructions below.

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Baking soda

Baking soda cleans as well as whitens, but is abrasive, so use it infrequently (just once or twice a month). To use baking soda as a teeth cleaner and whitener, mix a small amount with water into a paste consistency and use in the same way as regular toothpaste. This method had been used for centuries, since way before regular toothpaste became commercially available. Some brands promote it as an active ingredient in their paste. Alternatively, sprinkle a small amount straight onto a wet toothbrush or onto your regular toothpaste to improve its whitening qualities.

Hydrogen Peroxide

A useful disinfectant with antiseptic qualities and the ability to bleach teeth, hydrogen peroxide is used in many commercial toothpaste brands as well as in mouthwash, and is an effective way to whiten teeth. The best way to apply this method is to use a whitening kit. These can be bought inexpensively and use either a brush or tray to apply the solution to the teeth, lifting the stain from the enamel. Hydrogen peroxide can be mixed with water in equal parts to create a whitening mouth wash. After spitting out, leaving for two minutes to allow the whitening properties to take affect before thoroughly rinsing mouth out with water.

Oil pulling

This is an ancient ayurvedic remedy that involves swishing oil (sunflower and sesame are recommended) in the mouth, round and between teeth for twenty minutes before spitting out. The oil should have changed to a thin, white consistency. The oil attracts and removes bacteria and dissolve plaque and tartar, resulting in the teeth becoming healthier and whiter.

If you have any concerns regarding any of the methods listed, speak to a oral health professional before trying.

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Jennifer Smith

Life Coach & Personal Growth Blogger

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Last Updated on October 13, 2020

How to Spot a Burnout And Overcome It Fast

How to Spot a Burnout And Overcome It Fast

Burnout at work is an issue that most people who suffer from it, suffer unknowingly.

Have you ever felt that you can’t start an assignment, have an immense urge to Netflix binge, or couldn’t get yourself to wake up on time even though you have a lot on your plate? The cause for these might be burnout.

According to Deloitte’s report, “many companies may not be doing enough to minimize burnout.” This is to say that the responsibility is not only on the employee. According to that report, nearly 70 percent of professionals feel their employers are not doing enough to prevent or alleviate burnout within their organization, and they definitely should.[1]

Too many companies don’t invest enough in creating a positive environment. One out of five (21%) said that their company does not offer any programs or initiatives to prevent or alleviate burnout. It is the culture, not the fancy well-being programs that would probably do the best work.

This is a significant problem for individuals and companies, and it’s also an issue on a macro level. A Stanford University research found that more than 120,000 deaths per year, and approximately 5%–8% of annual healthcare costs, are associated with the way U.S. companies manage their workforces.[2]

It is both the employee and the employer’s responsibility—and the latter can certainly take more responsibility.

In this article, I’ll guide you on how to know if you suffer from burnout and, more importantly, what you can do about it.

Who Are Prone to Burning Out?

For starters, it is a good thing to know that you’re in good company. According to a Gallup poll, 23% (of 7,500 surveyed) expressed burnout more often than not. Additionally, 44% felt it sometimes. Nearly 50% of social entrepreneurs who attended the World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting in 2018 reported having struggled with burnout and depression at some point.[3]

According to Statista (2017), 13% of adults reported having problems unwinding in the evenings and weekends. According to a Deloitte survey (consisting of 1,000 full-time U.S. employees), 77% of respondents said that they have experienced employee burnout at their current job.[4]

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Burnout is not only an issue of the spoiled first-world. Rather, it is a serious matter that must be taken care of appropriately. It affects so many people, and its impacts are just too significant to be ignored.

Some occupations are more prone to burnout, such as people who deeply care about their jobs more than others. According to the Harvard Business Review, “Passion-driven and caregiving roles such as doctors and nurses are some of the most susceptible to burnout.”

The consequences can have life or death ramifications as “suicide rates among caregivers are dramatically higher than that of the general public—40% higher for men and 130% higher for women”. It is also the case for teachers, non-profit workers, and leaders of all kinds.[5]

Deloitte’s survey also found that 91% say that they have an unmanageable amount of stress or frustration. Heck, 83% even say that it can negatively impact their relationships. Millennials are slightly more impacted by burnout (84% of Gen Y vs. 77% in other generations).

What Is Burnout Syndrome?

So, what is it, exactly? Burnout was officially included in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) and is an occupational phenomenon.

According to the World Health Organization, burnout includes three dimensions:[6]

  1. Feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion;
  2. Increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job;
  3. Reduced professional efficacy.

The 5 Stages of Burnout

At this point, you must have a clue if you’re at risk of burnout. There are different methods for understanding where you are on the burnout syndrome scale, and one of the most common ones is the “five stages method.”

1. Honeymoon Phase

As you may remember If you’ve gotten married, there’s always the honeymoon phase. You’re so happy and feel almost invincible. You love your spouse and at this stage, you’re very excited about everything. It’s the same when it comes to taking on a new job or role or starting a new business.

At first, most of the time, you’re hyper-motivated. Although you might be able to notice signs of potential future burnout, in most cases, you might ignore them. You’re highly productive, super motivated, creative, and accept (and take) responsibility.

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The honeymoon phase is critical because if you plant the seeds of good mental health and coping strategies, you can stay at this phase for extended periods.

2. Onset of Stress

Let’s continue with the wedding metaphor. Now that you’re happily married for some time, you might start noticing certain issues with your spouse that you don’t like. You might have seen them before, but now they take up more space in your life.

You might be less optimistic and feel signs of stress or minor symptoms of physical or emotional fatigue at work. Your productivity reduces, and you think that your motivation is lower.

3. Chronic Stress

Let’s hope you don’t get there in your marriage, but unfortunately, some people get there. At this stage, your stress level is consistently high, and the other symptoms of stage 2 persist.

At this point, you start missing deadlines, your sleep quality is low, and you’re resentful and cynical. Your caffeine consumption might be higher, and you’re increasingly unsatisfied.

4. Burnout

This is the point where you can’t go on unless there is a significant change in your workspace environment. You have a strong desire to move to another place, and clinical intervention is sometimes required.

You feel neglected, your physical symptoms are increasing, and you get to a place where your stomach hurts daily. You might obsess over problems in your life or work and, generally speaking, you should treat yourself.

5. Habitual Burnout

This is the phase in which burnout is embedded in your life. You might experience chest pains or difficulty breathing, outbursts of anger or apathy, and physical symptoms of chronic fatigue.

The Causes of Burnout

So, now that we know how to identify our stage of burnout, we can move on to tackling its leading causes. According to the Gallup survey, the top burnout reasons are:[7]

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  1. Getting unfair treatment at work – This is not always something that you can fully control. At the same time, you should remember that even if you’re not calling the shots, it doesn’t mean that you have to accept unfair treatment. The consequences mentioned above are just not worth it in most cases.
  2. Workload – Another leading cause of stress according to dozens of interviews conducted before writing the article. According to Statista, in 2017, 39% of workers said a heavy workload was their leading cause of stress. We live in a busy work environment, and we will share some tips on how to manage that.
  3. Not knowing your role – While not something you can fully control, you can, and probably should, take action to better define it with your boss.
  4. Inadequate communication and support from your manager – Like the others above, you can’t fully control that, but as we’ll soon share, you can take action to be in better control.
  5. Time pressure – As mentioned, motivated, passionate workers are more in danger of experiencing burnout. One of the reasons is that they’re pressuring themselves to do more, sometimes at the expense of their mental health. We’ll address how to work on that as well.

How to Overcome a Burnout

After going over the stages of burnout and the leading causes of becoming burned out, it might be a good time to let you know that there is a lot you can do to fight it head-on.

However, let’s start with what you should not do. Burnout cannot be fixed by going on a vacation. It should be a long-term solution, implemented daily.

According to Clockify (2019), these are the popular ways to avoid burnout:

  1. Focus on your family life – 60% of adults said that stable family life is key to avoiding burnout. Maintaining meaningful relationships in your life is proven to reduce stress (instead of having many unmeaningful relationships).
  2. Exercising comes in second, with 58% reporting that jogging, running, or doing any exercise significantly relieves stress. Even a relatively short walk might improve your body’s resilience to stress.
  3. Seek professional advice – 55% say they would turn to a professional. There are online websites where you can speak with professionals at reduced costs.

Aside from the three most popular ways of avoiding burnout, you can also try the following:

1. Improve Time Management

Try understanding how you can use your time better and leave more time for relaxation. That’s easy to say (or write) but more challenging to implement. It would help if you started by prioritizing yourself. Understanding the connection between your values and your everyday tasks is a tremendous help. You can use proven methods to improve the relationship between your vision and goals to your daily life tasks’ lists. Check out the Horizons of Focus or V2MOM methods to get started.

2. Use the P.L.E.A.S.E. Method

The P.L.E.A.S.E. is a combination of things you should do to be at your best physically. It means Physical Illness (P.L.) prevention, Eat healthy (E), Avoid mood-altering drugs (A), Sleep well (S), and Exercise (E).

3. Prioritize

You don’t have to say yes to everything that comes across your way at work (or in other aspects of life). You’d be surprised how easy it can become once you start saying no. Some might even describe it as exhilarating.

4. Let Your Brain rest

Culturally, most of us are already wired to think that hard work is essential, and while that’s true in most cases, we sometimes forget that our brain needs to rest for it to recharge. Seven hours of sleep are essential (depending on your age). Meditation might be helpful, too.

5. Pay Attention to Positive Events

According to Therapistaid.com, we tend to focus on the bad things in our lives. However, by focusing on positive things, we can change our mindset. One way to practice this daily is by writing three good things about your life every morning or evening. It’s been scientifically proven that doing so for a few months can help rewire your brain.

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6. Take Some “You” Time

A Netflix binge is not always good for you, but it might be in some cases. The better the leisure time is, the better you’ll feel in the long term. It’s usually better to read a book or start a new hobby that requires more cognitive skills than just lying on the couch. But as long as you feel good watching a movie, that might be a good start.

7. New Technologies Might Be Helpful

There are tons of self-help apps such as Fabulous, Headspace (meditation), Noom (diet and exercise), and others. They’re good to use, but you should also be careful not to run away from your problems only to watch social media for hours. It’s not real, and no one’s life is perfect (even if their Facebook or Instagram feeds might seem so). You should also be aware not to be in an “always-on” mindset.

Bottom Line

Whether you’re at the first or the fifth stage of the burnout phases, the goal of this article is to show you that there are always ways to fight it. The first thing is self-awareness—knowing that there’s a problem. The second step is to decide what to do about it.

You can also consider using Lifehack’s community. You’re more than welcome to share your burnout story on our Facebook page.

Bonus: Rebound from Burnout in 8 Hours

Watch what you can do to rebound from burnout quickly in this episode of The Lifehack Show:

https://youtu.be/MNnyqQWK_zg

Featured photo credit: Lechon Kirb via unsplash.com

Reference

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