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The Secret Technique of Taking Awesome Food Photos

The Secret Technique of Taking Awesome Food Photos

You know when you go to a restaurant and you see something on the menu that makes your mouth water and you just have to have it? Have you tried your hand at taking pictures of your favorite dish and it looks like a hot mess? The tips we have below are going to help make the picture you take of a homemade super tasty burger look like the one on the menu—not what you really end up seeing in a greasy take-out bag.

Being that everyone has their phone on them at all times and people like food, it was a natural progression for us to start showing pictures of our food. Heck, even Vanity Fair has a Food Porn column that highlights the mobile photographs from chefs and food personalities all around the world. If you look on Twitter for the hashtag #foodporn or #foodie you can see lots of images people take of their food. Even Flickr has a lot of groups displaying nothing but food images.

Mobile Apps

The apps listed here are couple of the most popular camera apps for foodies. While you can use pretty much any camera to take a picture of your culinary creations, these are applications made specifically for food.

Hipstamatic (iPhone)

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Hipster

    The claim to fame with Hipster is the look it creates—very analog images.The added Foodie SnapPak is a combination of flash, lens, and film filters that create a very appealing look when it comes to food images.

    SnapDish Food Camera (Android)

    SnapDish

      SnapDish is an Android app made for food photography. When you capture the image of the great looking presentation on a plate, SnapDish processes the image to make it look amazing. Blur photos as if they’ve been taken with an SLR and share images on multiple sites at once.

      Be Quick

      Dishes don’t keep looking their best for very long: bread gets soggy, and food generally looks worse the longer it sits there. Make sure to have everything ready to take pictures as soon as the food is plated and perfect.

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      Try Multiple Angles and Different Exposure Settings

      When your food photo shoot is taking place, it’s a good idea to take a lot of pictures, but make sure to use different angles—you don’t always have to take shots from an overhead or seated view. See how the images turn out when you shoot from a level view. Get creative. The more images you have to choose from, the better.

      Lighting

      Natural-Lighting

        DO NOT use an in-camera flash. If you are using a standard camera app or other camera with a flash, try to use as much external lighting as possible. The flash from the camera/or camera phone app is going to be to direct and is much more likely to wash out parts of the image. If you have a good natural light source like a window, use it to your advantage.

        Have Something in the Background

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        food photo 2

          Having a contrasting background can really make make food pop out in the picture. Just like the dish itself, having a well placed fork or the angle of a square plate can change the look of the image drastically. Don’t crowd the space, just accent the area.

          Make Adjustments to the White Balance

          White-Balance

            Play around with the white balance a little; you want the whites in the food and/or background to look like they were bleached, not yellowish like an old jean jacket. Try taking a test picture of something white like a piece of paper first so you can make the correct adjustments. If you are in a public place where there might be lighting that can yellow the image, this step is really important.

            Aperture Settings

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            Aperture-Settings

              The aperture helps you keep things in focus. When you want your cupcake to be in focus but the half empty glass of milk in the background to be a little bit blurred, you can use smaller F-stop settings. Using small F-stop numbers will help also help with blurring in low light (like in a restaurant) by creating a shorter shutter speed. The opposite is true for well lit areas: for those, you will want to use a higher F-stop setting to get the whole image in focus.

              Get Right Up In There

              macro-settings

                Don’t be afraid to get really close when taking pictures of food. Using the macro to focus in on the plate of food can show the details. Depending on the app you are using, you may or may not have these adjustments.

                Final Thoughts

                When it comes to photography, each type of item you are capturing takes a different set of skills to highlight and focus on the right parts of the image, while the other parts act as accents. Foodie photography can take a bit of practice, but you’ll get the hang of it, and learning how to work the settings on your camera is key.

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                Trevor Dobrygoski

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                Last Updated on August 4, 2020

                8 Benefits of a Minimalist Lifestyle That Get You to Live With Less

                8 Benefits of a Minimalist Lifestyle That Get You to Live With Less

                Minimalism is a way to put a stop to the gluttony of the world around us. It’s the opposite of every advertisement we see plastered on the radio and TV. We live in a society that prides itself on the accumulation of stuff; we eat up consumerism, material possessions, clutter, debt, distractions and noise.

                What we don’t seem to have is any meaning left in our world.

                By adopting a minimalist lifestyle, you can throw out what you don’t need in order to focus on what you do need.

                I know first hand how little we actually need to survive. I was fortunate enough to live in a van for four months while traveling throughout Australia. This experience taught me valuable lessons about what really matters and how little we really need all this stuff we surround ourselves with.

                Less is more.

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                Living a minimalist lifestyle is reducing.There are a few obvious benefits of minimalism such as less cleaning and stress, a more organized household and more money to be found, but there are also a few deep, life-changing benefits.

                What we don’t usually realize is that when we reduce, we reduce a lot more than just stuff.

                Consider just some of the benefits of living with fewer possessions:

                1. Create Room for What’s Important

                When we purge our junk drawers and closets we create space and peace. We lose that claustrophobic feeling and we can actually breathe again. Create the room to fill up our lives with meaning instead of stuff.

                2. More Freedom

                The accumulation of stuff is like an anchor, it ties us down. We are always terrified of losing all our ‘stuff’. Let it go and you will experience a freedom like never before: a freedom from greed, debt, obsession and overworking.

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                3. Focus on Health and Hobbies

                When you spend less time at Home Depot trying unsuccessfully to keep up with the Joneses, you create an opening to do the things you love, things that you never seem to have time for.

                Everyone is always saying they don’t have enough time, but how many people really stop and look at what they are spending their time doing?

                You could be enjoying a day with your kids, hitting up the gym, practicing yoga, reading a good book or traveling. Whatever it is that you love you could be doing, but instead you are stuck at Sears shopping for more stuff.

                4. Less Focus on Material Possessions

                All the stuff we surround ourselves with is merely a distraction, we are filling a void. Money can’t buy happiness, but it can buy comfort. After the initial comfort is satisfied, that’s where our obsession with money should end.

                We are bombarded by the media presenting promises of happiness through materialistic measures. It’s no wonder we struggle everyday. Resist those urges. It’s an empty path, it won’t make you happy.

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                It’s hard not to get roped into the consumerism trap. I need constant reminders that it’s a false sense of happiness. I enjoy stuff, but I also recognize that I don’t need it.

                5. More Peace of Mind

                When we cling onto material possessions we create stress because we are always afraid of losing these things. By simplifying your life you can lose your attachment to these things and ultimately create a calm, peaceful mind.

                The less things you have to worry about, the more peace you have, and it’s as simple as that.

                6. More Happiness

                When de-cluttering your life, happiness naturally comes because you gravitate towards the things that matter most. You see clearly the false promises in all the clutter, it’s like a broken shield against life’s true essence.

                You will also find happiness in being more efficient, you will find concentration by having refocused your priorities, you will find joy by enjoying slowing down.

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                7. Less Fear of Failure

                When you look at Buddhist monks, they have no fear, and they have no fear because they don’t have anything to lose.

                In whatever you wish to pursue doing you can excel, if you aren’t plagued with the fear of losing all your worldly possessions. Obviously you need to take the appropriate steps to put a roof over your head, but also know that you have little to fear except fear itself.

                8. More Confidence

                The entire minimalist lifestyle promotes individuality and self reliance. This will make you more confident in your pursuit of happiness.

                What’s Next? Go Minimalism.

                If you’re ready to start living a minimalist lifestyle, these articles can help you to kickstart:

                Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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