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The Secret Technique of Taking Awesome Food Photos

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The Secret Technique of Taking Awesome Food Photos

You know when you go to a restaurant and you see something on the menu that makes your mouth water and you just have to have it? Have you tried your hand at taking pictures of your favorite dish and it looks like a hot mess? The tips we have below are going to help make the picture you take of a homemade super tasty burger look like the one on the menu—not what you really end up seeing in a greasy take-out bag.

Being that everyone has their phone on them at all times and people like food, it was a natural progression for us to start showing pictures of our food. Heck, even Vanity Fair has a Food Porn column that highlights the mobile photographs from chefs and food personalities all around the world. If you look on Twitter for the hashtag #foodporn or #foodie you can see lots of images people take of their food. Even Flickr has a lot of groups displaying nothing but food images.

Mobile Apps

The apps listed here are couple of the most popular camera apps for foodies. While you can use pretty much any camera to take a picture of your culinary creations, these are applications made specifically for food.

Hipstamatic (iPhone)

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Hipster

    The claim to fame with Hipster is the look it creates—very analog images.The added Foodie SnapPak is a combination of flash, lens, and film filters that create a very appealing look when it comes to food images.

    SnapDish Food Camera (Android)

    SnapDish

      SnapDish is an Android app made for food photography. When you capture the image of the great looking presentation on a plate, SnapDish processes the image to make it look amazing. Blur photos as if they’ve been taken with an SLR and share images on multiple sites at once.

      Be Quick

      Dishes don’t keep looking their best for very long: bread gets soggy, and food generally looks worse the longer it sits there. Make sure to have everything ready to take pictures as soon as the food is plated and perfect.

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      Try Multiple Angles and Different Exposure Settings

      When your food photo shoot is taking place, it’s a good idea to take a lot of pictures, but make sure to use different angles—you don’t always have to take shots from an overhead or seated view. See how the images turn out when you shoot from a level view. Get creative. The more images you have to choose from, the better.

      Lighting

      Natural-Lighting

        DO NOT use an in-camera flash. If you are using a standard camera app or other camera with a flash, try to use as much external lighting as possible. The flash from the camera/or camera phone app is going to be to direct and is much more likely to wash out parts of the image. If you have a good natural light source like a window, use it to your advantage.

        Have Something in the Background

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        food photo 2

          Having a contrasting background can really make make food pop out in the picture. Just like the dish itself, having a well placed fork or the angle of a square plate can change the look of the image drastically. Don’t crowd the space, just accent the area.

          Make Adjustments to the White Balance

          White-Balance

            Play around with the white balance a little; you want the whites in the food and/or background to look like they were bleached, not yellowish like an old jean jacket. Try taking a test picture of something white like a piece of paper first so you can make the correct adjustments. If you are in a public place where there might be lighting that can yellow the image, this step is really important.

            Aperture Settings

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            Aperture-Settings

              The aperture helps you keep things in focus. When you want your cupcake to be in focus but the half empty glass of milk in the background to be a little bit blurred, you can use smaller F-stop settings. Using small F-stop numbers will help also help with blurring in low light (like in a restaurant) by creating a shorter shutter speed. The opposite is true for well lit areas: for those, you will want to use a higher F-stop setting to get the whole image in focus.

              Get Right Up In There

              macro-settings

                Don’t be afraid to get really close when taking pictures of food. Using the macro to focus in on the plate of food can show the details. Depending on the app you are using, you may or may not have these adjustments.

                Final Thoughts

                When it comes to photography, each type of item you are capturing takes a different set of skills to highlight and focus on the right parts of the image, while the other parts act as accents. Foodie photography can take a bit of practice, but you’ll get the hang of it, and learning how to work the settings on your camera is key.

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                Last Updated on December 2, 2021

                The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

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                The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

                Camping can be hard work, but it’s the preparation that’s even harder. There are usually a lot of things to do in order to make sure that you and your family or friends have the perfect camping experience. But sometimes you might get to your destination and discover that you have left out one or more crucial things.

                There is no dispute that preparation and organization for a camping trip can be quite overwhelming, but if it is done right, you would see at the end of the day, that it was worth the stress. This is why it is important to ensure optimum planning and execution. For this to be possible, it is advised that in addition to a to-do-list, you should have a camping checklist to remind you of every important detail.

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                Why You Should Have a Camping Checklist

                Creating a camping checklist makes for a happy and always ready camper. It also prevents mishaps.  A proper camping checklist should include every essential thing you would need for your camping activities, organized into various categories such as shelter, clothing, kitchen, food, personal items, first aid kit, informational items, etc. These categories should be organized by importance. However, it is important that you should not list more than you can handle or more than is necessary for your outdoor adventure.

                Camping checklists vary depending on the kind of camping and outdoor activities involved. You should not go on the internet and compile a list of just any camping checklist. Of course, you can research camping checklists, but you have to put into consideration the kind of camping you are doing. It could be backpacking, camping with kids, canoe camping, social camping, etc. You have to be specific and take note of those things that are specifically important to your trip, and those things which are generally needed in all camping trips no matter the kind of camping being embarked on.

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                Here are some tips to help you prepare for your next camping trip.

                1. First off, you must have found the perfect campground that best suits your outdoor adventure. If you haven’t, then you should. Sites like Reserve America can help you find and reserve a campsite.
                2. Find or create a good camping checklist that would best suit your kind of camping adventure.
                3. Make sure the whole family is involved in making out the camping check list or downloading a proper checklist that reflects the families need and ticking off the boxes of already accomplished tasks.
                4. You should make out or download a proper checklist months ahead of your trip to make room for adjustments and to avoid too much excitement and the addition of unnecessary things.
                5. Checkout Camping Hacks that would make for a more fun camping experience and prepare you for different situations.

                Now on to the checklist!

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                Here is how your checklist should look

                1. CAMPSITE GEAR

                • Tent, poles, stakes
                • Tent footprint (ground cover for under your tent)
                • Extra tarp or canopy
                • Sleeping bag for each camper
                • Sleeping pad for each camper
                • Repair kit for pads, mattress, tent, tarp
                • Pillows
                • Extra blankets
                • Chairs
                • Headlamps or flashlights ( with extra batteries)
                • Lantern
                • Lantern fuel or batteries

                2.  KITCHEN

                • Stove
                • Fuel for stove
                • Matches or lighter
                • Pot
                • French press or portable coffee maker
                • Corkscrew
                • Roasting sticks for marshmallows, hot dogs
                • Food-storage containers
                • Trash bags
                • Cooler
                • Ice
                • Water bottles
                • Plates, bowls, forks, spoons, knives
                • Cups, mugs
                • Paring knife, spatula, cooking spoon
                • Cutting board
                • Foil
                • soap
                • Sponge, dishcloth, dishtowel
                • Paper towels
                • Extra bin for washing dishes

                3. CLOTHES

                • Clothes for daytime
                • Sleepwear
                • Swimsuits
                • Rainwear
                • Shoes: hiking/walking shoes, easy-on shoes, water shoes
                • Extra layers for warmth
                • Gloves
                • Hats

                4. PERSONAL ITEMS

                • Sunscreen
                • Insect repellent
                • First-aid kit
                • Prescription medications
                • Toothbrush, toiletries
                • Soap

                5. OTHER ITEMS

                • Camera
                • Campsite reservation confirmation, phone number
                • Maps, area information

                This list is not completely exhaustive. To make things easier, you can check specialized camping sites like RealSimpleRainyAdventures, and LoveTheOutdoors that have downloadable camping checklists that you can download on your phone or gadget and check as you go.

                Featured photo credit: Scott Goodwill via unsplash.com

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