Advertising
Advertising

How to Make Butter at Home: 3 Ridiculously Simple Methods

How to Make Butter at Home: 3 Ridiculously Simple Methods

How to make butter is a skill that everyone should learn. The process is superbly easy and the output—a velvety rich butter —is rewarding enough to motivate you to get started.

Why should you make butter at your own home?

  • It’s as easy as hitting “on” on your blender.
  • As long as you use a good, heavy cream, your butter will taste better than the industrially-produced ones.
  • It’s way fresher than its store counterpart. It’s devoid of any artificial preservatives or colors, as long as the cream you use is fresh as well.
  • It can be personalized. The flavor of the butter can vary depending on the type of cream and the type of spices you use. The possibilities of producing an innovative flavor are endless!

You don’t even need to be overwhelmed with the whole process. Because it’s relatively simple and easy to make, I won’t be surprised if you suddenly include butter-making in your weekly cooking routines! Are you ready? Let’s get started learning about how to make butter.

Advertising

The Shaking Method:

Things you’ll need: 

  • Cream (in room temperature)
  • Tight-fitting container
  • Filtering cloth like cheesecloth, paper coffee filters or medical gauze
  • Ice-cold water
  • Wooden spatulas

Things you’ll do:

Advertising

  1. Check your container meticulously. You don’t want bits of cream to mess up your whole kitchen just because your lid is loose, right?
  2. Put the room temperature cream in the tight-fitting container. Make sure that the container can hold at least twice the volume of the amount of cream you’re placing.
  3. Shake the container up and down repeatedly for 3 minutes. 
  4. After 3 minutes, you’d notice that the cream begins to feel heavier. Keep on going.
  5. After 3 minutes again, the cream will feel like a hard solid substance. You are to continue shaking until you feel the butter separating from the buttermilk. The sloshing sound is an indication of this.
  6. After hearing the sloshing sound, keep shaking for about 3 minutes once again.
  7. Cover the top of the jar with your filtering cloth and pour off the buttermilk.
  8. Fill your container with ice-cold water up until the top of the butter.
  9. Replace your earlier filtering cloth with a new one. Drain the container by pouring water out into the sink. Repeat until the water drains become clear.
  10. Also, drain the water under the butter by squeezing the butter with a wooden spatula. Use paper towels to absorb the drainage.
  11. Add salt as desired. Refrigerate your freshly made butter.

The Whipping Method: 

Things you’ll need:

  • Cream, preferably heavy
  • Chilled stainless steel bowl
  • Two wooden spatulas

Things you’ll do:

Advertising

  1. Pour your room temperature cream into your chilled bowl.
  2. Whip your cream until the cream looks dry enough.
  3. After viewing this, continue whipping until you see the separation of the butter and the buttermilk from each other.
  4. To prevent your butter from being spoiled quickly, put it in the blender and blend it together with ice-cold water.
  5. Blend in low speed for a minute.
  6. After a while, drain the water out of the blender by squeezing it between two wooden spatulas.
  7. Continue draining the butter until the water drainage becomes clear enough.
  8. Add salt as desired.
  9. Refrigerate.

The Blending Method:

Things you’ll need:

  • Whole cream
  • Blender, mixer or food processor
  • Ice-cold water
  • Wooden spatulas

Things you’ll do:

  1. Put your cream into your blender, mixer or food processor and whip into high speed. 
  2. Keep going until milk fat & solid substances (butter) separates from the liquid (buttermilk). You’ll hear the sloshing sound as the indication of this.
  3. Drain the buttermilk away from the butter by running it under ice-cold water and squeezing it between two wooden spoons or spatula. Some people even prefer using their own hands for the squeezing part.
  4. Squeeze as tight as possible – if there’s buttermilk left in your butter, your butter will get rancid quickly.
  5. Rinse it well with ice-cold water.
  6. Pack your butter into an air-tight container.
  7. Add salt as desired.
  8. Refrigerate accordingly.

So, there you have it! How to make butter is a process that’s simple, cost-effective and entertaining.

Advertising

If you ever have any difficulty with baking and cooking as your family bonding activities, why don’t you start with butter-making first? From then, you can even bring out some beverages, some bread and some butter to spread the creamy goodness all around.

More by this author

The Ultimate Morning Routine for Success of Highly Successful People 9 Surprising Benefits Of Kimchi That Will Make You Want To Try It Now 11 Signs That Tell You It’s Time to Let Go 10 Differences between a Bad Boss and a Great Boss This Old Woman Has Lived On A Cruise Ship For 7 Years

Trending in Lifestyle

1 Science Says Guitar Players’ Brains Are Different From Others’ 2 How to Practice Positive Meditation in 2 Simple Steps 3 How to Invest in Yourself: 3 Valuable Ways to Change Your Life 4 15 Ways to Cultivate Continuous Learning for a Sharper Brain 5 How to Help Nausea Go Away Fast with These 5 Fixes

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on June 20, 2019

Science Says Guitar Players’ Brains Are Different From Others’

Science Says Guitar Players’ Brains Are Different From Others’

There’s nothing quite like picking up a guitar and strumming out some chords. Listening to someone playing the guitar can be mesmerising, it can evoke emotion and a good guitar riff can bring out the best of a song. Many guitar players find a soothing, meditative quality to playing, along with the essence of creating music or busting out an acoustic version of their favourite song. But how does playing the guitar affect the brain?

More and more scientific studies have been looking into how people who play the guitar have different brain functions compared to those who don’t. What they found was quite astonishing and backed up what many guitarists may instinctively know deep down.

Advertising

Guitar Players’ Brains Can Synchronise

You didn’t read that wrong! Yes, a 2012 study[1] was conducted in Berlin that looked at the brains of guitar players. The researchers took 12 pairs of players and got them to play the same piece of music while having their brains scanned.

During the experiment, they found something extraordinary happening to each pair of participants – their brains were synchronising with each other. So what does this mean? Well, the neural networks found in the areas of the brain associated with social cognition and music production were most activated when the participants were playing their instruments. In other words, their ability to connect with each other while playing music was exceptionally strong.

Advertising

Guitar Players Have a Higher Intuition

Intuition is described as “the ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning” and this is exactly what’s happening when two people are playing the guitar together.

The ability to synchronise their brains with each other, stems from this developed intuitive talent indicating that guitar players have a definite spiritual dexterity to them. Not only do their brains synchronise with another player, but they can also even anticipate what is to come before and after a set of chords without consciously knowing. This explains witnessing a certain ‘chemistry’ between players in a band and why many bands include brothers who may have an even stronger connection.

Advertising

This phenomenon is actually thought to be down to the way guitarists learn how to play – while many musicians learn through reading sheet music, guitar players learn more from listening to others play and feeling their way through the chords. This also shows guitarists have exceptional improvisational skills[2] and quick thinking.

Guitar Players Use More of Their Creative, Unconscious Brain

The same study carried out a different experiment, this time while solo guitarists were shredding. They found that experienced guitar players were found to deactivate the conscious part of their brain extremely easily meaning they were able to activate the unconscious, creative and less practical way of thinking more efficiently.

Advertising

This particular area of the brain – the right temporoparietal junction – typically deactivates with ‘long term goal orientation’ in order to stop distractions to get goals accomplished. This was in contrast to the non-guitarists who were unable to shut off the conscious part of their brain which meant they were consciously thinking more about what they were playing.

This isn’t to say that this unconscious way of playing can’t be learnt. Since the brain’s plasticity allows new connections to be made depending on repeated practice, the guitar player’s brain can be developed over time but it’s something about playing the guitar in particular that allows this magic to happen.

Conclusion

While we all know musicians have very quick and creative brains, it seems guitar players have that extra special something. Call it heightened intuition or even a spiritual element – either way, it’s proven that guitarists are an exceptional breed unto themselves!

More About Music Playing

Featured photo credit: Lechon Kirb via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next