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How to Detox your Body with Tea

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How to Detox your Body with Tea

Those pesky toxins are getting into our bodies and making us feel cruddy all day! Unfortunately, few of us take the time to detox ourselves, sitting in years of built-up gunk and metals running wild around our bodies.

Detoxes have been given the image of taking up time and intruding on the daily schedules of our busy selves. However, we drink gallons of it every day and some of us swear by it, yet no one has taken the time to really understand the full power of this everyday substance. I’m talking about tea.

Let’s look at how to detox your body with tea.

Go Green

At one point or another, you’ve probably heard about the magical elixir that is green tea. Filled with endless anti-oxidants, vitamins, and general goodness, it has become a staple part of many gym-goers and health-conscious people’s diets.

Some of the features of Green tea include:

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  • Helps burn fat: The anti-oxidant features of the tea help speed up your metabolic rate, resulting in energy being burned, even when not active.
  • Improves immunity: Fights against flu and colds.
  • Super medicine: There have been reports that it can prevent and guard against certain cancers, arthritis, and diabetes.
  • Re-hydrates: Going against common beliefs that tea dehydrates you, green tea has been found to have similar re-hydration effects to our old friend H2O.
  • Neurological: Has been shown to prevent degenerative and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

This is only just a small list of the benefits green tea offers, but I’ll focus in on a super, duper food that harnesses 10 times the power of normal green tea.

Bring in Japanese Matcha Tea. 

Drinking one cup of Matcha tea is equal to 10 cups of green tea, talk about nutritional overload!

Matcha tea is incredibly popular in Japan and is now becoming widely recognized throughout the world for its ability to aid in detox plans and regimes. Some of the key benefits of Matcha tea include:

  • Prevents cancer with its high levels of anti-oxidants named catechins, which seek out and find dangerous free radicals within your body.
  • Prevents heart disease by lowering LDL cholesterol, or the bad type.
  • Helps in burning fat by increasing thermogensis from 8 – 10% to 35 – 43%.
  • Contains 5 times more L-theanine, an amino acid which helps with neurological activities, than standard green tea.

Going green is good not just with your vegetables but also with your tea — the greener the better.

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Refresh

Detoxing your body with tea will always consist of 2 parts, the morning being the refresh and the evening being the colon cleanse (explained further in the next section). The refresh in the morning should focus on replacing the lost vitamins and electrolytes from the evening colon cleanse tea, and failing to do so will inhibit the full potential of a tea detox.

A refresh tea should contain a blend of ingredients that have high levels of anti-oxidants, vitamins, and general various other goodies. Matcha tea is a favorite of mine, generally being the key ingredient for my morning refresh tea. You should focus on adding other complimentary ingredients such as:

  • Acai Berry
  • Ginseng
  • Barley Grass
  • Spirulina (another super duper food)

At this point the flavor takes a tumble so don’t expect anything out of this world. However, if you need to add anything to change the flavor, I recommend adding any of these: stevia (natural sweetener), honey, mulberries, ginger powder, or lemon juice.

Colon Cleanse

It sounds pretty scary but for a full body tea detox it’s essential to rid yourself of the daily build up of toxins, metals, and gunk. Like the morning refresh, the colon cleanse tea should have a key ingredient: senna leaf, which will provide the laxative effect.

The FDA has given their consent for Senna to be used as a natural laxative, so no worries there.

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Creating a blend is again vital for increasing the effectiveness of this tea, so I recommend adding some of these ingredients in with your senna leaf:

  • Dried orange peel
  • Dandelion plant
  • Nettle leaf
  • Lemon grass
  • Liquorice root

Not only do they all help to add flavor to the tea, they also increase the effects and benefits of the colon cleanse. Either adding fiber, nutrients, or vitamins, each ingredient should be considered a key part of the detox colon cleanse blend.

Routine

You know about the benefits and powers of tea for detox, so now you need to know how you can use it in your daily life style. You’ll find that it’s actually non-intrusive and super simple to do!

Morning

As soon as you get out of bed, boil water, add lemon slices or juice, and add ginger. This helps with waking up your organs and kick-starting your metabolism.

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20 minutes thereafter, make your morning refresh tea, giving yourself the anti-oxidant, vitamin, and energy boost you need for the rest of the day.

Day

Throughout the day drink multiple cups of green tea, either normal green tea or a blend such as green tea with jasmine (3-6 cups as an example). White tea is also acceptable.

Night

To make your colon cleanse tea of choice, either buy a blend or create your own with the example ingredients I’ve mentioned above.

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Follow this routine for 7, 14, or 28 days at a time and see the benefits that are presented to you. Remember that, like any other detox, it’s vital you change up your food plans and meals plans too. You can’t expect changes to take place without commitments elsewhere.

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Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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