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How To Choose The Right Type Of Aftershave

How To Choose The Right Type Of Aftershave

Many widely available aftershaves are pretty good–maybe because many widely available razors and shave creams are so bad. But the wide variety of aftershave products can be confusing, especially with all the different terminology that gets listed without much explanation.  Lets look at a general overview of aftershaves with how to choose the right one.

What Is An Aftershave?

“Aftershave” can mean different things to different people.  I am talking about products that are applied immediately after shaving to provide some combination of irritation relief, skin moisturizing, and protection from the elements.  Select an aftershave based on how that combination addresses the needs of your skin.

Aftershaves can be divided into two broad categories: balms and splashes. Balms are heavier-feeling on the skin and typically provide more irritation relief and more moisture to the skin, particularly in cold or dry climates.   Splashes are more watery-feeling and generally contain a combination of toners, astringents, and hydrosols to cleanse and provide a degree of antiseptic or antibacterial protection to the skin.  They are more popular with those who have oily skin or live in hot, humid climates.  Both balms and splashes often use some kind of humectant to increase the effectiveness of other ingredients.  There are also “cross-over” ingredients that might be used in either a balm or a splash.  Let’s take a closer look at some of those ingredients.

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Toners and Astringents

Toners and astringents are designed to cleanse the skin and temporarily shrink the appearance of pores.  Toners are used in the relief of minor skin irritations, like superficial cuts, rashes from allergies, insect bites, and fungal infections like athlete’s foot. They can also help heal scars.  Astringents are the strongest form of toner, containing a high proportion of alcohol (20-60%).  They are commonly recommended for oily skin as they tend to dry out the skin, but keep in mind that the removal of oil from the skin can lead to excess oil production as the skin tries to compensate and prevent moisture loss.  Topically applied astringents cause mild coagulation of skin proteins and will dry, harden, and protect the skin. Astringents are best applied only to problem areas of skin to prevent excessive drying (except pure witch hazel distillate which can be applied broadly to the skin).  Some common ingredients include:

  • alum
  • oatmeal
  • acacia
  • yarrow
  • witch hazel
  • distilled vinegar
  • alcohol

Astringent preparations include:

  • silver nitrate
  • potassium permanganate
  • zinc oxide
  • zinc sulfate

Hydrosols

Hydrosols are the product of steam distillation from aromatic plants. Hydrosols go by other names like floral water, herbal distillates, hydrolate, herbal water or essential water.  Hydrosols are produced in the same manner as essential oils but essential oils will float to the top of the distillate where they are removed, leaving behind the watery distillate. In the past, hydrosols were considered a byproduct of distillation, but now they’re considered an important product in their own right. The science of distillation is based on the fact that different substances vaporize at different temperatures.

So hydrosols contain diluted essential oils. Because hydrosols are produced at high temperatures and are somewhat acidic, they tend to inhibit bacterial growth (but they are NOT “sterile”). Hydrosols can also help the skin get back a normal pH by being more acidic, where soaps may be more alkaline.  Rose distillates are known to be mildly antibacterial, while lavender distillates are mildly antiseptic.  By the way, its a good idea to keep hydrosols refrigerated.  They’ll last longer, and they can feel nice in the heat of the summer.

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Moisturizers

Moisturizers are combinations of ingredients specially designed to make the external layers of the skin softer and more pliable by increasing the skin’s water content.  It does that not by putting water into the skin, but by reducing evaporation.

Humectants

Humectants are ingredients used to increase the skin penetration and activity time of another ingredient. They are also used to minimize the dehydrating effects of some other active ingredient.  Examples of humectants include:

  • glycerol
  • propylene glycol
  • sorbitol
  • lactic acid
  • urea

Skin Types

Now that you have some background on what aftershaves are composed of, the question still remains: how should you use them?  The answer to that depends partly on what kind of skin you have.  How do you know what type of skin you have?  Here are some guidelines.

Normal skin

Appears evenly-textured, smooth, clear and healthy, with barely visible pores and without blemishes or spots.  You could probably use any mild aftershave splash or balm in this case.  To maintain clear skin, be sure to use a good quality facial wash with a facial scrub once or twice a week.

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Sensitive skin

Will itch, sting or break out in a rash when you use certain shaving and skincare products.  You’ll need to try to use aftershave and other products specifically made for sensitive skin.

Dry skin

Appears rough, dull or cracked with lines and wrinkles, and prone to peeling. A moisturizing aftershave balm would work well here.  Using a moisturizer just before bed might be useful here too.  Be sure to use a gentle face wash and if you use a facial scrub, use it only once a week. Make sure you drink plenty of water.

Oily skin

Looks shiny, particularly on the forehead, nose and chin (the “T-Zone”), and feels, well, oily to the touch.  The skin appears to have large or open pores and is prone to blackheads, whiteheads, spots and pimples.  An aftershave splash with a toner would probably be your best bet.  Oily skin attracts dust and dirt so it might also be useful to use a facial cleanser twice daily, a facial scrub 2 or 3 times a week and use an oil-free moisturiser.

Combination skin

Will have a central greasy area around the forehead, nose & chin but will be dry around the cheeks.  Its also prone to blackheads, especially around the nose.  The best way of dealing with combination skin is either to use products designed specifically for combination skin, or to simply apply the correct products to the relevant area of your face‒dry skin products for the dry areas, and oil-free products for the T-Zone.

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Ingredients

Some ingredients to look for in aftershaves:

  • aloe vera
  • chamomile
  • tea tree oil
  • calendula
  • witch hazel
  • lavender
  • jojoba oil
  • grapefruit seed extract
  • rose oil distillate
  • various vitamins

Some ingredients to avoid:

  • high concentrations of alcohol or camphor
  • grapefruit (if you’re going to be outdoors a lot)
  • lemon oil or eucalyptus (if you have sensitive skin)

Applying Multiple Aftershave Products

This could not be simpler: apply the thinnest product first followed by thicker products.

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Last Updated on February 21, 2019

12 Best Brain Foods That Improve Memory and Boost Brain Power

12 Best Brain Foods That Improve Memory and Boost Brain Power

Nutrition plays a vital role in brain function and staying sharp into the golden years. Personally, my husband is going through medical school, which is like a daily mental marathon. Like any good wife, I am always looking for things that will boost his memory fortitude so he does his best in school.

But you don’t have to be a med student to appreciate better brainiac brilliance. If you combine certain foods with good hydration, proper sleep and exercise, you may just rival Einstein and have a great memory in no time.

I’m going to reveal the list of foods coming out of the kitchen that can improve your memory and make you smarter.

Here are 12 best brain foods that improve memory:

1. Nuts

The American Journal of Epidemiology published a study linking higher intakes of vitamin E with the prevention on cognitive decline.[1]

Nuts like walnuts and almonds (along with other great foods like avocados) are a great source of vitamin E.

Cashews and sunflower seeds also contain an amino acid that reduces stress by boosting serotonin levels.

Walnuts even resemble the brain, just in case you forget the correlation, and are a great source of omega 3 fatty acids, which also improve your mental magnitude.

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2. Blueberries

Shown in studies at Tuffs University to benefit both short-term memory and coordination, blueberries pack quite a punch in a tiny blue package.[2]

When compared to other fruits and veggies, blueberries were found to have the highest amount of antioxidants (especially flavonoids), but strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries are also full of brain benefits.

3. Tomatoes

Tomatoes are packed full of the antioxidant lycopene, which has shown to help protect against free-radical damage most notably seen in dementia patients.

4. Broccoli

While all green veggies are important and rich in antioxidants and vitamin C, broccoli is a superfood even among these healthy choices.

Since your brain uses so much fuel (it’s only 3% of your body weight but uses up to 17% of your energy), it is more vulnerable to free-radical damage and antioxidants help eliminate this threat.

Broccoli is packed full of antioxidants, is well-known as a powerful cancer fighter and is also full of vitamin K, which is known to enhance cognitive function.

5. Foods Rich in Essential Fatty Acids

Your brain is the fattest organ (not counting the skin) in the human body, and is composed of 60% fat. That means that your brain needs essential fatty acids like DHA and EPA to repair and build up synapses associated with memory.

The body does not naturally produce essential fatty acids so we must get them in our diet.

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Eggs, flax, and oily fish like salmon, sardines, mackerel and herring are great natural sources of these powerful fatty acids. Eggs also contain choline, which is a necessary building block for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, to help you recall information and concentrate.

6. Soy

Soy, along with many other whole foods mentioned here, are full of proteins that trigger neurotransmitters associated with memory.

Soy protein isolate is a concentrated form of the protein that can be found in powder, liquid, or supplement form.

Soy is valuable for improving memory and mental flexibility, so pour soy milk over your cereal and enjoy the benefits.

7. Dark chocolate

When it comes to chocolate, the darker the better. Try to aim for at least 70% cocoa. This yummy desert is rich in flavanol antioxidants which increase blood flow to the brain and shield brain cells from aging.

Take a look at this article if you want to know more benefits of dark chocolate:

15 Surprising and Science-Backed Health Effects of Dark Chocolate

8. Foods Rich in Vitamins: B vitamins, Folic Acid, Iron

Some great foods to obtain brain-boosting B vitamins, folic acid and iron are kale, chard, spinach and other dark leafy greens.

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B6, B12 and folic acid can reduce levels of homocysteine in the blood. Homocysteine increases are found in patients with cognitive impairment like Alzheimer’s, and high risk of stroke.

Studies showed when a group of elderly patients with mild cognitive impairment were given high doses of B6, B12, and folic acid, there was significant reduction in brain shrinkage compared to a similar placebo group.[3]

Other sources of B vitamins are liver, eggs, soybeans, lentils and green beans. Iron also helps accelerate brain function by carrying oxygen. If your brain doesn’t get enough oxygen, it can slow down and people can experience difficulty concentrating, diminished intellect, and a shorter attention span.

To get more iron in your diet, eat lean meats, beans, and iron-fortified cereals. Vitamin C helps in iron absorption, so don’t forget the fruits!

9. Foods Rich in Zinc

Zinc has constantly demonstrated its importance as a powerful nutrient in memory building and thinking. This mineral regulates communications between neurons and the hippocampus.

Zinc is deposited within nerve cells, with the highest concentrations found in the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for higher learning function and memory.

Some great sources of zinc are pumpkin seeds, liver, nuts, and peas.

10. Gingko biloba

This herb has been utilized for centuries in eastern culture and is best known for its memory boosting brawn.

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It can increase blood flow in the brain by dilating vessels, increasing oxygen supply and removing free radicals.

However, don’t expect results overnight: this may take a few weeks to build up in your system before you see improvements.

11. Green and black tea

Studies have shown that both green and black tea prevent the breakdown of acetylcholine—a key chemical involved in memory and lacking in Alzheimer’s patients.

Both teas appear to have the same affect on Alzheimer’s disease as many drugs utilized to combat the illness, but green tea wins out as its affects last a full week versus black tea which only lasts the day.

Find out more about green tea here:

11 Health Benefits of Green Tea (+ How to Drink It for Maximum Benefits)

12. Sage and Rosemary

Both of these powerful herbs have been shown to increase memory and mental clarity, and alleviate mental fatigue in studies.

Try to enjoy these savory herbs in your favorite dishes.

When it comes to mental magnitude, eating smart can really make you smarter. Try to implement more of these readily available nutrients and see just how brainy you can be!

More Resources About Boosting Brain Power

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Reference

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