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Guide to March Gardening in the U.S.

Guide to March Gardening in the U.S.

    With the dismal month of February now behind us, March gives hope of spring and new beginnings.  It’s the perfect time to start working on your spring gardening plans, even though spring doesn’t officially start until much later in the month. Much of the United States still has to contend with cold weather spells in March, but for the southern portions of the country, things are already starting to heat up.

    For many parts of the U.S., spring has already sprung or is just around the corner.  It’s an exciting time for gardeners, who have yet another chance to tend to and raise some some amazing plants, veggies, fruits, and flowers.

    Consult the guide below for recommendations on how to best tackle gardening in your region.

    All Areas –

    • If you’ve neglected your houseplants all winter, now is the time to start feeding and watering them again. If necessary, repot them, and when watering make sure not to overdo it.
    • If you have wet soil in your garden, avoid walking on it.
    • Get your soil tested so you know what you’re up against this spring and summer.

    The Regions:

    Mid-Atlantic –

    Average March Temps: Low 25.4° High 44.5° (Albany, NY) ,  Low 37° High 58.4° (Richmond, VA)

    While frost is still an issue in March, hardy annuals such as Alyssum, Dianthus, and Viola can still go out before the last expected frost. Hold off on planting your summer bulbs and tubers until the soil warms up and dries, and plant shrubs when the ground warms.  You’ll also want to wait on planting vegetables and fruits until the danger of frost has passed and the ground is no longer frozen and is actually workable.  If you have roses in your garden, prune them before buds break.

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    Midwest –

    Average March Temps:   Low 25.7° High 47.3° (Sioux City, IA),  Low 36° High 55.8° (Kansas City, MO)

    Frost is also an issue in many Midwestern states during the month of March, so you’ll want to start growing your seeds indoors.  You can also cut back grasses, as well as finish pruning shrubs.  Start spraying fruit trees.

    Northeast –

    Average March Temps: Low 25.2° High 42.2° (Portland, ME),   Low 20.1° High 38.1° (Montpelier, VT)

    It’s still rather cold in the Northeast in March, so like the Midwest, you’ll want to start your warm season seeds indoors and keep an eye on plant crowns that might have heaved out of the ground during a thaw.  Towards the end of the month as it warms up, you can start removing mulch.

    Pacific Northwest –

    Average March Temps: Low 14° High 30° (Missoula, MT),   Low 35° High 45° (Seattle, WA)

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    March in the Pacific Northwest is conducive to starting your seeds of greens indoors.  Things you can do to start preparing your garden include: deadheading early bloomers, continuing to mulch, diligently hunt slugs and set out your apple maggot traps. At the end of the month you can plant peas.

    Southeast –

    Average March Temps:  Low 33° High 53° (Birmingham, AL),  Low 50° High 72° (Orlando, FL)

    Unlike the northern parts of the country, in the southeast you can start actually planting things in the ground.  This is an excellent time to plant cool season vegetables such as lettuce, peas, root veggies, cabbage, broccoli, chard, and greens. You can also plant cool season flowers and berry bushes. Cool season greens and root crops (carrots, onions, beets, radishes, turnips) can be planted directly outdoors.  Seeds of warm season vegetables like tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant should be started indoors at this time.

    Southwest –

    Average March Temps:  Low 17° High 41° (Colorado Springs, CO),  Low 41° High 66° (Phoenix, AZ)

    The Southwestern portion of the U.S. can also start planting things outdoors beginning in March, but freezes are still possible so you’ll want to keep covers on hand.  Start out by pulling back your mulch so that the soil can warm up. You can start planting your summer bulbs, as well as beets, greens, lettuce, potatoes, and corn.  Indoors, you’ll want to start growing your eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, squash and melons – it’s still a little too cold for them.

    Regional Exceptions:

    Florida –

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    Average March Temps:  Low 64° High 80° (Miami, FL),  Low 50° High 73° (Tallahasse, FL)

    It’s tropical season in Florida right now, so for the most part you’re safe.  Cold spells can happen on occasion, so keep prepared. At this time you can begin replacing cool weather annuals with summer annuals, and start putting your perennials in the ground so they can establish. Plant your warm season crops before it gets too hot out.  You should have already started growing your citrus trees in containers, now you can transplant those outdoors.  Established citrus trees can be fertilized now, but you should wait 4 to 6 weeks to feed newly planted ones.

    Northern California –

    Average March Temps:  Low 50° High 68.6° (Chico, CA),  Low 44.5° High 69.9° (San Francisco, CA)

    In Northern California, March is the time to start planting summer blooming bulbs and tubers.  You’ll also want to prune old growth off the bougainvillea, plant potatoes, and fertilize trees and shrubs.  Feed your roses, and harden and set out seedlings. It’s a great time to start gardening!

    Southern California –

    Average March Temps:  Low 44.5° High 69.9° (Los Angeles, CA),  Low 41.9° High 74° (Carlsbad, CA)

    If you haven’t done it already, start your seeds.  It’s also time to spray fruit trees and divide fall blooming perennials.  Start scouting for slugs and snails.

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    Hawaii –

    Average March Temps:  Low 45.3° High 62.6°

    Hawaii is a year-round, gardening paradise. At this time of the year you’ll want to continue mulching and start feeding your gardenias.  It’s also time to sow a cover crop.

    Alaska –

    Average March Temps:  Low 38.1° High 51.7° (Anchorage, AK)

    While many people think of Alaska as perpetually snowy, it’s actually got four seasons and gets warm.  March, however, is still on the cold side so it’s best to start your seeds indoors right now.  You can also check on your rhubarb, it could be up.

     

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    Julie McCormick

    Julie McCormick is a writer, and co-owner of The Cleveland Leader, a Technorati Top 1000 site.

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    Last Updated on March 13, 2019

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

    You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

    Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

    1. Work on the small tasks.

    When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

    Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

    2. Take a break from your work desk.

    Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

    Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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    3. Upgrade yourself

    Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

    The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

    4. Talk to a friend.

    Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

    Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

    5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

    If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

    Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

    Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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    6. Paint a vision to work towards.

    If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

    Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

    Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

    7. Read a book (or blog).

    The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

    Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

    Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

    8. Have a quick nap.

    If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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    9. Remember why you are doing this.

    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

    10. Find some competition.

    Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

    11. Go exercise.

    Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

    Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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    Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

    12. Take a good break.

    Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

    Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

    More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

    Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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