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Fight Off Winter Colds with Foods that Boost Your Immune System

Fight Off Winter Colds with Foods that Boost Your Immune System

If there’s one thing that can be counted on during the winter months, it’s the ubiquitous seasonal cold. No matter where you go, chances are you’ll come across several people who are coughing, sneezing, snuffling, and wheezing unpleasantly, with the sore red noses and bleary eyes characteristic of a (very contagious) affliction that’s sure to drag on for weeks. Unless you plan to seal yourself into a bubble until spring, you’re very likely to come into contact with some of these people over the next few months, and you’ll undoubtedly end up with their cold or flu germs fluttering around you.

Aside from wearing a hazmat suit every time you leave the house, there are some steps you can take to fend off the winter plague. Washing your hands often, using hand sanitizers after being on public transit, and keeping distance from sickly co-workers are a few examples, and you can give your immune system a solid boost via the food that you eat. Every single bite we take has an impact on our health, so take special care to fill yourself up with foods that will help, not hinder, the healing process:

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Foods Rich in Vitamin C

Strawberries, raw tomatoes, citrus fruits, red peppers, and broccoli are all packed with Vitamin C, which makes your white blood cells more active with infection-fighting dance party moves.

Garlic

Laden with antibiotic, anti-fungal, and antiseptic properties, garlic has been hailed for its healing properties for thousands of years. The ancient Greeks and Egyptians used it as medicine, and it was used to treat gangrene in both world wars. Unfortunately, this powerfully pungent plant is most potent and effective when it’s raw, as many of the compounds are broken down or destroyed during the cooking process. If you’re hesitant to chow down on raw garlic cloves, consider blending a few into a pesto with fresh herbs and olive oil, and stirring that into room-temperature soup: that way, the garlic will retain its health benefits, but be slightly more palatable. You’ll still have dragon breath, though.

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Honey

Honey soothes sore throats, and has antimicrobial properties that help fight off infections. Buckwheat and alfalfa honey have higher levels of antioxidants and nutrients (especially if it’s organic), and taking a spoonful every day will power-up your immune system with its numerous live enzymes, vitamins, and minerals. Note: don’t give honey to children under 2 years of age, as they can develop infant botulism from spores that the honey might be contaminated with.

Zinc-Laden Foods

Zinc helps your body fight off infection, and speeds the healing of wounds and inflammations. This zippy-sounding mineral can be found in red meat and poultry, and is also present in seafood, whole grains, nuts, beans, and dairy products. Some cereals and non-dairy milks are fortified with zinc, but it’s best to get in its natural form.

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Ginger

This gnarly little root has both antiviral and antibiotic properties, and is rich in vitamin and minerals. It helps to inhibit bacterial growth, is a powerful antioxidant, and is super-effective at killing off the common cold virus. If you’re already sick, ginger will help to lower your fever and calm chills, and it’s also a very mild pain reliever. To make ginger tea, grate an inch or so into a few cups of boiling water, and simmer for a few minutes over low heat. You can also juice ginger raw for maximum effect: put a 1-inch slice of ginger through your juicer along with 2 peeled apples, 1 peeled beet, and 2 carrots, and then add a dash of cayenne pepper for good measure for an immune-boosting power drink.

Live “Good” Bacteria

The live active cultures in yoghurt and kefir increase your intestinal flora (Lactobacillus reuteri! say that three times fast!) which help to block the replication of viruses in the body. These are the only kinds of dairy products that should be consumed when you’re ill, though: see the last paragraph of this piece for info on why.

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Tea

Green and black tea are packed with antioxidant flavonoids that help repair cellular damage when you’re still healthy, while herbal tea like peppermint or ginger soothe queasy bellies if you’re feeling under the weather. Tea helps to replenish your body’s fluids, and most importantly, it’s really soothing and comforting. Both soup and tea are like warming internal hugs when you’re feeling sickly, so be sure to quaff plenty of it if you feel the lurgy coming on.

If you’ve already come down with something nasty, the foods listed above can help you to get over your illness more quickly, and will hopefully be comforting and delicious as well. There are also some edibles that are best avoided if you’d like a speedy recovery: avoid dairy products, which can thicken mucus and phlegm, and stay away from sugar—it makes your illness-fighting white blood cells sluggish, thus acting as an immune system suppressant. Be sure to get plenty of rest, cut down on junk food in favour of vegetables, whole grains, fruits, and lean proteins, and you’re certain to fight off any cold you encounter.

Featured photo credit:  Winter woman in snow looking at camera via Shutterstock

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Catherine Winter

Catherine is a wordsmith covering lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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