Advertising
Advertising

Eyes Sore? Here are 22 Solutions

Eyes Sore? Here are 22 Solutions
eye strain

    Computer Vision Syndrome, or computer eyestrain, can be caused by a variety of things. Most commonly it is a result of bad lighting and/or long hours. Since I’m getting a strain right now, how about we explore how was can prevent, or ease, eyestrain.

    This [very well organized] list from The Lighting Blog provides 22 ideas to keep your eyes focused and reading right.

    The first few are good to do even if your eyes are fine but want to keep your productivity up. Try taking a break.

    1. Take a few minutes away from your computer, better yet your desk each hour.

    2. If you can’t leave your desk, lean back, close your eyes and relax.

    3. Segment auxiliary work tasks; use them to break up otherwise lengthy computer sessions.

    Advertising

    4. Quickly revive yourself with a few easy stretches.

    Good Lighting:

    5. Overhead lighting and bright light emanating from behind your monitor are tough on the eyes. If you have the option, use table lamps off to either side of your work area.

    6. If you are close to a sunny window, close or adjust the blinds so light does not fall directly onto your monitor.

    7. Avoid working in a dark room. Your monitor will be like a bright beacon in the dark. Your eyes will have to struggle between the extremes of light and dark. If you must work in near dark conditions, try dimming the brightness of your monitor screen.

    8. If you really mean to kick computer eye strain and want to properly light your home or office workspace, shop specifically for high-quality task lights that not only throw a measured degree and quality of light, but also reduce glare.

    Advertising

    It turns out that the dryness of office space, coupled with the fact that you apparently blink only one third the normal amount while at the computer, can increase eyestrain too.

    9. Natural plants in your workspace can increase humidity as well as control dust and other irritating particles.

    10. Over the counter natural tear products are useful to relieve dry eyes, a main complaint among heavy computer users.

    Maybe the problem lies in your monitor?

    11. The CRT refresh rate may be custom calibrated to reduce the flicker, and in turn reduce the typical eye strain and fatigue associated with a low refresh rate.

    As a rule, the higher the refresh rate, the better for your vision, although some sources report no noticeable difference above a certain range.

    Advertising

    12. Invest in a flat screen model. Flat screens of any kind provide a much more graphically sound image than those on the old curved screens. Flat screen CRTs offer better refresh rates and a richer palette of contrast and color adjustments.

    13. Invest in a laptop. If you are considering a laptop, the LCD monitors vary in size from a tiny 10” up to 19”. Regardless of the width of the screen these monitors deliver high definition graphics, deep color contrast and a well-worth-it range of adjustable settings. Compare and contrast pixel specifications to determine which will most suit your needs.

    14. Configure your computer’s graphics settings for optimal visual comfort.

    15. Font sizes may be adjusted for your comfort, as well. If you find yourself leaning forward to read the text on the screen then you should increase the point size of your font.

    16. Optometrists recommend a computer monitor be somewhere between 20 and 30 inches from your eyes. The length of your arm, from shoulder to finger tips, should be just about right for measuring the distance between yourself and the monitor.

    17. Anti-glare monitor shields and filters may be optical glass quality, polarized, and designed for CRT, flat panel or laptop monitors.

    Advertising

    The right change for the right job:

    18. Data Entry Professionals and Administrative Assistants typically convert data from documents to electronic databases. Document holders minimize eye-strain by keeping hard-copy documents vertical and at the same distance from your eyes as the monitor. Eyes that must constantly readjust for distance and position will tire and become sore much sooner.

    19. Computer Programmers work intensively with complex computer languages heavy on symbols and intricate visual configurations. Some sources suggest more code-concise and visually friendly fonts for programmers such as Courier, New Courier and a slew of other customized fonts; some free, and some with a price tag.

    20. Graphics/Web Designers should have a top of the line high definition monitor for intricate art and design work. Adjust your operating system to make it easy on the eyes. If you use Windows and have an LCD monitor enable ClearType.

    Or maybe it’s just your damn eyes!

    21. Get an eye exam. According to the American Optometric Association, adults up to age 40 should have an eye exam every three years; those aged 40 to 60, every two; and 60 plus, every year.

    22. Computer Viewing Glasses, maybe? Perhaps you’ve heard or read about the glasses you can get to wear while working with your computer.

    22 Ways to Reduce Eye Strain at Your Computer – [TheLightingBlog]

    More by this author

    Craig Childs

    Craig is an editor and web developer who writes about happiness and motivation at Lifehack

    8 Steps to Continuous Self Motivation Even During the Difficult Times How Not To Suck At Socializing – Do’s & Don’ts Ten Ways to Improve Your Quality of Life How To Initiate Conversation Storage Ideas For Small Spaces

    Trending in Lifestyle

    1 How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck 2 How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries 3 How to Manage Anxiety: Sound Advice from a Mental Health Expert 4 How to Start Eating Healthy No Matter How Old You Are 5 Understanding Intermittent Fasting Benefits: More Than Just Weight Loss

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on March 13, 2019

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

    You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

    Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

    1. Work on the small tasks.

    When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

    Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

    2. Take a break from your work desk.

    Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

    Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

    Advertising

    3. Upgrade yourself

    Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

    The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

    4. Talk to a friend.

    Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

    Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

    5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

    If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

    Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

    Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

    Advertising

    6. Paint a vision to work towards.

    If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

    Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

    Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

    7. Read a book (or blog).

    The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

    Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

    Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

    8. Have a quick nap.

    If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

    Advertising

    9. Remember why you are doing this.

    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

    10. Find some competition.

    Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

    11. Go exercise.

    Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

    Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

    Advertising

    Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

    12. Take a good break.

    Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

    Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

    More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

    Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

    Read Next