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Easy DIY Christmas Decor Ideas

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Easy DIY Christmas Decor Ideas

DIY projects are very fulfilling tasks to take on. Not only do you get the satisfaction of accomplishing something, but you save a good part of your holiday budget, allowing you to allot it to your other holiday needs. When you start a DIY project, you also get to bond with your family when you enlist their help. Get the holiday look you want without having to spend a fortune by checking out these lovely Christmas projects you can quickly accomplish on your own.

DIY Holiday Lanterns

Sparkly Paper Lanterns

Sparkly paper lanterns add glitz and glamor to your Christmas decor without the hefty price tag or even the sweat. Just coat a store-bought paper lantern with glue, and sprinkle silver or gold glitter until the lantern is fully covered. To avoid making a mess out of all the glitter, lay used newspaper on your work space. Hang the lanterns on your doorway or above tables to make holiday gatherings extra festive. Visit the Two Delighted blog for a detailed tutorial on this sparkly lantern DIY project.

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Fun, Fancy, Easy-To-Make Garlands

Elegant Ornament Garland

Ornament garlands can be pricey, so why not make something with what you have on hand? Put your old Christmas balls and ribbons to good use by turning them into an elegant garland.

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diy decor - ball garland

    String old ornaments through the ribbon one at a time. Create a random pattern with a variety of ornament sizes and textures for added visual interest. Hang the garland above your mantel, on the door or a bed post, or by the window.

    Bowtie Garland

    Macaroni crafts scream kid-friendly, making this project perfect if you want your children to help you make Christmas decor! This alternative DIY garland from the Gold Jellybean allows you to use things that may already be available in your home, such as glue and glitter, which my kids will definitely love working with. Simply coat the pasta with glue, sprinkle glitter on it, and tie a yarn or string around it.

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    This cute garland can be used to decorate your kids’ bed posts or even as festive kitchen decor. It’s also perfect as a finishing touch for your Christmas tree or as an ornament for your wreath, swag, or centerpiece.

    Gilded Pine Cone Garland

    Recycle some old pine cones by painting them anew! Spray them with a shimmering gold spray paint, then tie them along a string to create a garland. Hang the garland on your door, window, or staircase for an elegant touch. In my case, I used gold leafing, which is more time-consuming but really pretty.

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    Photos from Jen Lutz
      Photos from Jen Lutz

      Aside from making pine cones into a garland, they can also be used as table centerpieces when placed in clear bowls or hurricane glasses.

      Mini Christmas Trees

      Miniature Winter Wonderland Christmas Tree

      Infuse a winter wonderland feel into any room of your home with a mini, snowy Christmas tree. For this project, all you need are cheap bottle brush trees, mason jars, hot glue, and some salt.

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      Photo by Steve Snodgrass via flickr. CC BY 2.0
        Photo by Steve Snodgrass via flickr. CC BY 2.0

        To make, simply glue the miniature trees to the underside of the jar lid and sprinkle some salt over it for a frosty touch. You can also include a miniature Santa or a reindeer for a more Christmas-y theme. Wrap a fancy ribbon around the mason jar to make it even more adorable. Visit the Put it in a Jar blog to see a heartwarming finished product.

        For a more creative holiday season, get crafty and decorate your home with these budget-friendly DIY Christmas decor projects. You can even spread the cheer by giving your creations to family and friends!

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        Last Updated on January 27, 2022

        5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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        5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

        Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

        “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

        Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

        Food is a universal necessity.

        It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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        Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

        Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

        Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

        Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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        The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

        Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

        This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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        Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

        Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

        Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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        So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

        Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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