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Did You Know You’re a Genius?

Did You Know You’re a Genius?


    You might not be a genius right this second but guess what? You have just as much ability as anyone else to become one. Move over Tiger Woods, move over Einstein, move over all the geniuses of the past! It’s time to let your hidden talents shine!

    Did you know that genes only play a very small part when it comes to genius ability?

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    So, it doesn’t matter what genes we inherit from our parents, we still have the ability to improve ourselves to ‘genius’ level – whether it be our intelligence, our sporting ability, our artistic or even musical ability.

    Modern science has now revealed that:

    • Intelligence is not fixed
    • Talents are not innate gifts – but the result of a slow accumulation of skills
    • No one is genetically designed into greatness and few are biologically restricted from attaining it

    This groundbreaking research means that WE ALL have the ability to improve and become a genius at pretty much any skill of our choosing.

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    So – if genes don’t matter for much, what does make a difference?

    It’s been proven that there are distinct key themes for achieving genius ability. Over the last 3 decades psychologists have looked at a huge variety of high achievers, including golfers, nurses, typists, gymnasts, violinists, chess players, basketball players & computer programmers.

    Here’s what they found in common across all ‘types’ of achievers:

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    • Practicing a new hobby/sport/mental discipline actually changes your body. There are physical changes in the muscles, nerves, hearts, lungs and brains of those showing profound increases in skill in any domain.
    • People are not skilled at EVERYTHING. People who are amazing at one particular skill don’t automatically become good at other skills. E.g. poker players can remember hundreds of card positions in sequence but have an average memory for everything else.
    • Brain power excels. Even among sports athletes, changes in the brain have the most profound effect on performance.
    • Short-term intensity cannot replace long-term commitment. Change takes place over long periods. It does not happen overnight.

     

    So many of us doubt ourselves and don’t even try to learn new skills – usually because of fear and a lack of faith in our own ability. Geniuses really are no different to you or I – they’ve just put in the hard yards and believed in themselves.

    Now you know you have a genius lurking inside – what will you do differently?

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    Some practical steps you can take to become a genius

    • Embrace continuous learning. Look for ways to continually improve yourself. Take courses, regularly review your progress and look for ways to improve
    • Learn to love failure. Successful people understand that failure is a prerequisite for success. Each time you fail, you’re one step closer to reaching your goals. Let go of fear of failure and you’ll achieve so much more than you thought was ever possible.
    • Read more. Reading everyday will vastly improve your vocabulary, your knowledge within your chosen area and will set you ahead of your competitors. I like to devote half an hour to reading every day.
    • Set goals. Goals are essential if you want to succeed. Goals motivate you and provide the energy you need to commit in the long run.
    • Know your strengths. You’re much better off focusing on your strengths and not worrying about your weaknesses. As Einstein said: “everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish on its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”
    • Find a coach or mentor. It’s important to have someone to work with you on your goals. Even Tiger Woods and Brian Tracey (who is over 70 yrs old) still have a coach to help them get achieve their goals!
    • Don’t expect success overnight. Chances are you won’t become a genius overnight. Extraordinary skills aren’t learned in a week. Only a long-term commitment and hard work will get you results.

    (Photo credit: Hand Showing 3D Pixel Brain via Shutterstock)

    More by this author

    Zoe B

    A strategist, coach and blogger who shows people how to stop what isn't working for them in life and to start to plan the life they really want.

    6 Effective Ways to Enhance Your Problem Solving Skills How to Increase Brain Power: 10 Simple Ways to Train Your Brain 12 Inspiring Quotes from Richard Branson that Enrich your Life 7 Irritating Thoughts That Throw You Off Track How to Overcome Boredom

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    Last Updated on June 13, 2019

    5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

    5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

    Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

    You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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    1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

    It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

    Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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    2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

    If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

    3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

    If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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    4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

    A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

    5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

    If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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    Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

    Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

    Reference

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