Advertising

The Biggest Waste of Time in Your Life Uncovered

Advertising
The Biggest Waste of Time in Your Life Uncovered

What’s the biggest waste of time in your life? I’m sure for some it’s watching too much television, for many it’s spending too much time on the internet, but though those are significant time wasters for sure they’re not mine. The biggest waste of time in my life is worrying. If you’re not a worrier, you can’t possibly understand, but if you are, you’re out there nodding your head as you read this.

Time spent worrying, is time spent not living. Worrying by its very nature takes us out of the present moment and into the past, ruminating over what has already happened or into the future, projecting what might possibly come to pass. Worry keeps us trapped in our heads and keeps us from truly enjoying our life, as it’s unfolding. Some planning is necessary, taking action mandatory, but worrying…optional.

Advertising

Why are we wasting so much time worrying?

We spend time worrying about losing our jobs, or not being able to find one, instead of enjoying the job we do have or calmly contemplating how we could improve our work life or exploring better career options, or spending our time furthering our education and improving our skills.

We spend time wringing our hands about not having enough money, not being able to pay our bills and not being able to buy the things we need and enjoy, instead of being grateful for what money we do have and enjoying the things that are already in our lives.

Advertising

We worry about never finding true love or losing the love we have, instead of learning to love ourselves more and nurturing our relationships so that they are deep, lasting, and fulfilling. If we’re wasting time lamenting over a lack of love, or loss of love, then we’re not spending time paying attention to the people who are already present in our lives.

We waste a considerable amount of time worrying about what the rest of the world thinks about us. We spend precious time courting favorable opinions, comparing ourselves to others, pursuing approval and worrying that we will never get it. How much better if this time were spent actually doing the things we want, rather than thinking about what other people’s reactions will be?

Advertising

We needlessly spend time worrying about unimportant things. We get bent out of shape over tiny insults; we agonize over decisions that won’t matter next week. We often spend more time worrying about what we’re going to wear, where we want to eat or what we’re going to say, than we do enjoying our meal, experiencing what we’re doing or having the conversations.

I can’t speak for everyone else, not even all of the other worriers out there, but I know that I spend a considerable amount of time worrying, ruminating, and anxiously projecting. That time would be much better spent focusing on the work at hand, paying attention to the people around me now, and reveling in the experiences that are happening in this very moment. As I said before, time spent worrying, is time spent not living in the life we have at this very moment in time. That is truly the biggest time waster of all.

Advertising

Featured photo credit:  picture of pensive businesswoman via Shutterstock

More by this author

Royale Scuderi

A creative strategist, consultant and writer who specializes in cultivating human potential for happiness, health and fulfillment.

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want 3 Simple Ways to Invest in Yourself and Change Your Life 50 Unique and Really Fun Date Ideas for Couples Why You Need to Say No! More Often How to Fall Asleep Fast and Have a Restful Sleep (The Definitive Guide)

Trending in Lifestyle

1 Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things 2 20 Best Budget Travel Destinations to Go At Least Once in Your Life 3 14 Surreal Places In America Even The Locals May Not Have Explored 4 How To Have A Holiday To Any Exotic Destination Even If You Can’t Afford It 5 12 Common Characteristics Of People Who Love Traveling

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 22, 2021

Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things

Advertising
Thanksgiving: It’s About The Simple Things

Thanksgiving, a day of pure gluttony, football, and possible uncomfortable situations with family members that you may or may not like. Oh, yeah, and the whole “know and reflect on what it is to be thankful and grateful.”

During the holiday season many people forget what this time of year is bout and are too worried about getting the “early-bird” deals on Black Friday and making sure that they have the perfect gifts for their loved ones. I am sort of a “Grinch” when it comes to the holiday season, mostly because of that mentality by many of the poeple around me.

But instead of being grinch-like this holiday season, I decided to simplify things and get back to what this time of year is actually is about; being thankful for what I have and what I can give.

Advertising

Simplify

I’m not a “minimalist” in any real sense, but in the last few months the talks of Patrick Rhone and others have got me to rethink my stance. Can you really have too much stuff?

Absolutely.

And with all that stuff comes the burden and the weight of it on your back.

Advertising

If you feel that the things around you are out of control, maybe it’s time to simplify and be thankful and grateful for what you have and use. Here are a few things that you can do to simplify:

  • You know those gadgets in the drawer that you said you were going to sell? Well, time to get the listing on eBay and sell them. Or, send them to a place like Gazelle. Even if they are old and won’t get money, you can at least recycle them.
  • Get rid of things you don’t need. Like old books, clothes, tools, etc. Have something that’s been laying around forever with no use? Donate it to a charity or church. If you aren’t using it, someone else could be.
  • Find your productivity tools and stick with them. Use tools and gadgets that serve multiple purposes so you can simplify your tool set.

Be Mindful

You don’t have to be a master Buddhist or meditator to be mindful (although, it can definitely help). Being mindful comes down to being cognizant of the present and not keeping yourself in the past or future. It’s about living in the moment and being aware of yourself and everything around you. It’s just being.

Without getting too “California” on you, it is super important to be mindful during the holiday rush. Rather than worrying about the things that you forgot at your house on the way to relatives or thinking about the next stop in your endless holiday travels, just breath and think about what you are currently doing.

Advertising

Spend the time with your family and friends and don’t crush the moment. Try not to concentrate so hard on getting the perfect photo of the “awesome moment” of the day and actually miss the awesome moment.

Being mindful over the holidays will help you be with your families, friends, and yourself allowing you to enjoy your time.

Reflect

As the year is coming to a close (yes, it really is that close!) it’s a great time to start reflecting on what you have accomplished and what you haven’t. Within the next few weeks we will have a more throrough reflection article here at Lifehack.org, but reflecting every now and then over your holiday break is a great way to see where you have been doing well in your life and where you need to improve.

Advertising

Reflection shouldn’t be used to “get down” on yourself. Reflection should be used to take an honset inventory of what you have accomplished, how you handeled situations, and what you can do better. If you journal everyday (a daily form of reflection) it may be a good time to start going over some of the things that you have written and start to put together a year’s end journal entry. I mean, how else will you write your autobiography?

But, seriously, reflecting on yourself makes you aware of your successes and faults and helps you plan and make goals for the coming year. It makes you a better person.

So, while you are stuffing your face with bird, stuffing, and mashed taters’, remember that the holidays are much more than the superficial things. Use this holiday to become a better person.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: Libby Penner via unsplash.com

Read Next