Advertising
Advertising

An Environment for Learning

An Environment for Learning

Let’s say you decide to go back to college.

This time, you are going to do it on your own terms. Not because you have to, but because you want to. You are older and wiser now, and you have the ability to look back, taking advantage of the fact that hindsight is 20-20.

However, we’re not going back in time; you are making this decision as one for today. You have arrived at the golden state of being an adult learner and you fully understand the value of lifelong learning. You now know why you need to take certain courses, challenging your professors to coach and mentor you, not just lecture you. Further, you know that if you plan ahead enough, you can interview your prospective professors, choosing the best who teach the courses you’ve elected to take.

Advertising

Let’s also say, that you do have to play by the rules. You have to take a core curriculum first, getting basic credits out of the way before you get to the ‘good stuff.’ Still, you are not willing to just do the time, going through the motions, sitting there waiting for the bell to ring so you can be on to the next thing. You’re going to engage, milking every moment for what it’s worth, playing offense and making it count. You now understand it isn’t just what you’re learning, but how you learn it. Comprehension versus memorization, questioning versus naïve acceptance, retention and personal application … you now understand the bennies of the ‘how’ that comes with the ‘what.’

How would you make the most of it?

What is the best possible environment for learning that you would create for yourself, one where you get all fired up and excited about learning? How will you fit this charged-up experience into the total form you are creating for your life, so there is no overwhelm, no stress, just a great fit? What are the differences that hindsight has helped you reconcile?

Advertising

Yes, you definitely are older and wiser now. You consider these things carefully. Deliberately. Purposefully.
Have some thoughts in mind? Good.

Next step: Think about how you can create your imaginary college plan for the best possible learning environment where you work, and in the job you have right now. For the role you have.

  • The ‘teacher’ is your boss, or another workplace mentor— who? And that’s just one of them; reconsider your entire professional network. No college student settles for just one professor, why should you?
  • The tuition payments are captured on that line item of your business plan called ‘staff education, training, and tuition reimbursements.’ Are you using it up each budget year, or have you let it waste away untouched?
  • The course curriculum you choose from? Well, the world is your oyster, and the classrooms could very well be virtual ones. Come to think of it, you could probably make some killer app choices which don’t cost you a dime now that you’re wired up for internet access as your now-world basics … it’s just another utility payment, right?

Now the cool part, the fun part. Remember, this is about want to, not have to:
What are your choices?

Advertising

  • What will you choose to learn?
  • Why did you make those choices? What is your ultimate goal? Did you write down your learning objectives so you can check them off, and stay the course?
  • What’s the value add? Remember, this is today, and you’ve become someone who understands that ‘payment’ is about much more than money. You want some ROI for effort and for your precious attention; what is it?
  • When will you be ‘in class,’ and have you blocked those sacred times on your calendar as non-negotiable?
  • Your ‘grading’ has probably become some kind of metric, a measurement. Of what? When are your grading periods; your ‘semesters?’ When will you feel you can tip it into some workplace synergy, so you know it truly counts?
  • We learn for the second time when we teach it, and we become mentor and coach. Who will be your student, and when can you start the goodness for both of you? Perhaps it can be a combination debrief-dialogue/re-teaching… Have you calendared those times too?

The environments most conducive for learning have very little to do with brick and mortar classrooms, don’t they.

In today’s world, where the phenomenal spider web of optic cable and wireless wizardry connects us to teachers around the globe, location needn’t be a factor at all.

The best learning environments are created by and constructed with our brains, our attitudes about learning, our unwillingness to waste a single moment of thought, and choices which are made. Once made, lifelong learners cement their choices into the best form for their lives by decisive, deliberate actions. They then re-teach because they can’t not teach; learning excitement has captured their spirit and enlivened it with renewed energy.

Advertising

Want that for yourself. Do not let another day go by paying lip service to being a lifelong learner. This is your life; grow it with learning that matters because it matters to you.

Related Articles:

  • Line Up for Learning! We have a learning forum coming up on Talking Story soon; let us help you with your choices on the what and the how!

Rosa Say is the author of Managing with Aloha, Bringing Hawaii’s Universal Values to the Art of Business and the Talking Story blog. She is the founder and head coach of Say Leadership Coaching, a company dedicated to bringing nobility to the working arts of management and leadership. For more of her ideas, click to her Thursday columns in the archives; you’ll find her index in the left column of www.ManagingWithAloha.com

Rosa’s Previous Thursday Column was: It’s not the Perks

More by this author

Rosa Say

Rosa is an author and blogger who dedicates to helping people thrive in the work and live with purpose.

12 Rules for Self-Management The Six Basic Needs of Customers What’s the difference between Mission and Vision? 7 Steps for Resolving Customer Complaints Reap Joy from this Thanks – Giving Holiday

Trending in Lifestyle

1 How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck 2 How to Find Weight Loss Meal Plans That Work for You 3 14 Healthy Easy Recipes for People on the Go 4 How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries 5 How to Manage Anxiety: Sound Advice from a Mental Health Expert

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

Advertising

3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Advertising

6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

Advertising

9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

Advertising

Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

Read Next