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Americans Should Stop Eating These Banned Foods ASAP

Americans Should Stop Eating These Banned Foods ASAP

Certain foods in developed countries are prohibited for a variety of reasons. Some foods are banned because they are dangerous and may increase risks of mental, emotional, and physical dysfunctions.  They’re also responsible for causing health disorders, such as cancer, damage to the nervous system, diabetes, birth defects, allergies, and more. The majority of Americans consume these dangerous food products, which are legally advertised and sold in grocery stores throughout the United States.

Some foods are banned in other nations because of cultural, sustainability, religious purposes; others for downright strange and weird reasons.  For instance, Singapore bans chewing gum because people would leave chewed gum everywhere. For more than 20 years, Singapore declared it illegal to sell or chew gum. However, in 2004, Singapore changed the law allowing citizens to obtain a doctor’s prescription for the 9,000-year-old substance.

Another strange example of banned foods in other countries is the use of ketchup in French schools. Chairperson of the National Association of Directors of Collective Restaurants, Christophe Hebert, said this about ketchup’s influence on France’s future generations: “We have to ensure that children become familiar with French recipes so that they can hand them down to the following generation” (The Telegraph).

However, when it comes to proving wholesome, healthy, and quality food products in the U.S., American food manufacturers fall short in comparison with other countries around the world. For instance, many of the banned foods in other countries are processed in North America using dangerous practices; most of them contain genetically-engineered ingredients, growth promoters, and harmful additives.

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Banned Foods Around the World

American health is deteriorating and spiraling down when compared to other industrialized countries, causing greater than before health care expenses and increased rates of preventable diseases.  The following are some banned foods that governments ban or strictly prohibit because of health concerns and in response to inhumane preparation processes.

Milk produced in the U.S. is on the list of banned foods in the European Union, Australia, Canada, Israel, and New Zealand. Nevertheless, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of the synthetic version of the hormone bovine somatotropin (BST), naturally produced in the pituitary gland of cows, which helps them produce milk.

Monsanto, an American multinational agrochemical and agricultural biotechnology corporation developed the synthetic version of BST called recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone (rBGH). However, in an attempt to protect its citizens from genetically modified milk, the United Nations Food Safety Agency banned rBGH milk in the 101 nations worldwide it represents. It is believed that exposure to rBGH in milk products increases the risk of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer.

Added to the list of banned foods are U.S. arsenic-based drugs approved as animal feed. Claims are that they make the meat fresher, pinker, and speed up animal growth. More than 70 percent of nine billion broiler chickens in the U.S. were fed the arsenic-based feed drug Roxarsone in 2007.

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Chronic arsenic exposure has been found to cause kidney damage or failure, an increased risk of miscarriages, infant mortality, low IQ and blood pressure, skin lesions, headaches, anemia, and an increased risk of diabetes. Arsenic-based drugs are on the list of banned foods in the European Union.

Dangerous Foods That Target Children

Banned foods by some countries are also targeted for young American children and infants. Many of these banned foods contain more than 3,000 food additives that researchers have linked to increase the risks of cancer, behavioral and birth defects, in addition to allergy-like hypersensitivity reactions in children. Synthetic ingredients, colors, flavoring, and preservatives are considered health risks and are found in macaroni and cheese, children’s cereals, Jell-O, and cheddar-flavored crackers.

The most popular dyes used in the U.S. are blue 2, yellow 5 and 6, and red 40. Australia and Norway added these food additives to their list of banned foods. The British government requested all food manufacturers refrain from using dyes in food products by the end of 2009. In addition, the European Union requires foods containing dyes must also have a warning label.

Banned foods containing potassium bromate in other parts of the world are allowed in the U.S. baked goods. Potassium bromate is linked to increased risks of cancer, thyroid problems, and kidney and nervous system damage. In the U.S., commercial bakeries use enriched brominated flour containing potassium bromate claiming it helps make the bread stand up on bread hooks better, while making it more elastic. Food products containing potassium bromate, like some bread, wraps, bagel chips, rolls, and breadcrumbs are banned foods in China, the European Union, and Canada.

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Some of the citrus flavored sodas and sports drinks sold in the U.S. contain the flame retardant brominated vegetable oil (BVO) and are listed as banned foods in other nations. BVO is found in drinks like Gatorade, Mountain Dew, Fanta Orange, Squirt, and Powerade, to name a few. BVO is linked to schizophrenia, birth defects, organ damage, hearing loss, and growth damage. Toxic levels of bromine may cause cardiac arrhythmia, acne, skin rashes, loss of appetite and fatigue.

Furthermore, BVO can cause cancer, hypothyroidism, autoimmune disease, and iodine deficiency. Japan and most countries in Europe added BVO to their list of banned foods; whereas, the U.S. still allows this dangerous chemical in a variety of soft drinks.

In the ’80s, nutritionists, dieticians, and healthcare professionals found that fatty foods caused increased risks of obesity, diabetes, and other maladies. A crusade to reduce the amount of unhealthy fats in food took place across the country.  In 1996, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the food additive olestra, which is an ingredient used to help eliminate fat in a variety of food products. Time magazine reported olestra as one of the worst inventions.

The Cleveland Clinic advises, “…foods touted as fat free or low fat are usually poor alternatives to an already low-nutritional value food such as fat free ice cream and olestra-laden potato chips.”

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The United Kingdom and Canada banned foods that contain the fat substitute known as olestra, or also referred to as olean. Olestra is free of calories and is used in “fat-free” products like French fries, chips, and Frito-Lay’s light chip products. Olestra causes digestive difficulties, such as diarrhea, fecal urgency, anal leakage, gastrointestinal disturbances, as well as looser and more frequent bowel movements. Olestra rapidly reduces and drains blood levels of important fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamins, A, D, E, and K.

Learning more about banned foods in other industrialized countries can optimize your health. Make it a practice to avoid potentially harmful, dangerous, and questionable food products that inundate American grocery shelves. For that matter, completely avoid all processed foods and choose raw, whole, and organic foods.

If you choose to eat meat and poultry products, organic, grass-fed beef and poultry raised on pastures are healthier choices.

If you would like to help your family and friends control their health, share this information about banned foods with them in order to assist them in making better and healthier alternatives as well.

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Last Updated on September 28, 2020

The Pros and Cons of Working from Home

The Pros and Cons of Working from Home

At the start of the year, if you had asked anyone if they could do their work from home, many would have said no. They would have cited the need for team meetings, a place to be able to sit down and get on with their work, the camaraderie of the office, and being able to meet customers and clients face to face.

Almost ten months later, most of us have learned that we can do our work from home and in many ways, we have discovered working from home is a lot better than doing our work in a busy, bustling office environment where we are inundated with distractions and noise.

One of the things the 2020 pandemic has reminded us is we humans are incredibly adaptable. It is one of the strengths of our kind. Yet we have been unknowingly practicing this for years. When we move house we go through enormous upheaval.

When we change jobs, we not only change our work environment but we also change the surrounding people. Humans are adaptable and this adaptability gives us strength.

So, what are the pros and cons of working from home? Below I will share some things I have discovered since I made the change to being predominantly a person who works from home.

Pro #1: A More Relaxed Start to the Day

This one I love. When I had to be at a place of work in the past, I would always set my alarm to give me just enough time to make coffee, take a shower, and change. Mornings always felt like a rush.

Now, I can wake up a little later, make coffee and instead of rushing to get out of the door at a specific time, I can spend ten minutes writing in my journal, reviewing my plan for the day, and start the day in a more relaxed frame of mind.

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When you start the day in a relaxed state, you begin more positively. You find you have more clarity and more focus and you are not wasting energy worrying about whether you will be late.

Pro #2: More Quiet, Focused Time = Increased Productivity

One of the biggest difficulties of working in an office is the noise and distractions. If a colleague or boss can see you sat at your desk, you are more approachable. It is easier for them to ask you questions or engage you in meaningless conversations.

Working from home allows you to shut the door and get on with an hour or two of quiet focused work. If you close down your Slack and Email, you avoid the risk of being disturbed and it is amazing how much work you can get done.

An experiment conducted in 2012 found that working from home increased a person’s productivity by 13%, and more recent studies also find significant increases in productivity.[1]

When our productivity increases, the amount of time we need to perform our work decreases, and this means we can spend more time on activities that can bring us closer to our family and friends as well as improve our mental health.

Pro #3: More Control Over Your Day

Without bosses and colleagues watching over us all day, we have a lot more control over what we do. While some work will inevitably be more urgent than others, we still get a lot more choice about what we work on.

We also get more control over where we work. I remember when working in an office, we were given a fixed workstation. Some of these workstations were pleasant with a lot of natural sunlight, but other areas were less pleasant. It was often the luck of the draw whether we find ourselves in a good place to work or not.

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By working from home we can choose what work to work on and whether we want to face a window or not. We can get up and move to another place, and we can move from room to room. And if you have a garden, on nice days you could spend a few hours working outside.

Pro #4: You Get to Choose Your Office Environment

While many companies will provide you with a laptop or other equipment to do your work, others will give you an allowance to purchase your equipment. But with furniture such as your chair and desk, you have a lot of freedom.

I have seen a lot of amazing home working spaces with wonderful sets up—better chairs, laptop stands that make working from a laptop much more ergonomic and therefore, better for your neck.

You can also choose your wall art and the little nick-nacks on your desk or table. With all this freedom, you can create a very personal and excellent working environment that is a pleasure to work in. When you are happy doing your work, you will inevitably do better work.

Con #1: We Move a Lot Less

When we commute to a place of work, there is movement involved. Many people commute using public transport, which means walking to the bus stop or train station. Then, there is the movement at lunchtime when we go out to buy our lunch. Working in a place of work requires us to move more.

Unfortunately, working from home naturally causes us to move less and this means we are not burning as many calories as we need to.

Moving is essential to our health and if you are working from home you need to become much more aware of your movement. To ensure you are moving enough, make sure you take your lunch breaks. Get up from your desk and move. Go outside, if you can, and take a walk. And, of course, refrain from regular trips to the refrigerator.

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Con #2: Less Human Interaction

One of the nicest things about bringing a group of people together to work is the camaraderie and relationships that are built over time. Working from home takes us away from that human interaction and for many, this can cause a feeling of loss.

Humans are a social species—we need to be with other people. Without that connection, we start to feel lonely and that can lead to mental health issues.

Zoom and Microsoft Teams meeting cannot replace that interaction. Often, the interactions we get at our workplaces are spontaneous. But with video calls, there is nothing spontaneous—most of these calls are prearranged and that’s not spontaneous.

This lack of spontaneous interaction can also reduce a team’s ability to develop creative solutions—there’s just something about a group of incredibly creative people coming together in a room to thrash out ideas together that lends itself to creativity.

While video calls can be useful, they don’t match the connection between a group of people working on a solution together.

Con #3: The Cost of Buying Home Office Equipment

Not all companies are going to provide you with a nice allowance to buy expensive home office equipment. 100% remote companies such as Doist (the creators of Todoist and Twist) provide a $2,000 allowance to all their staff every two years to buy office equipment. Others are not so generous.

This can prove to be expensive for many people to create their ideal work-from-home workspace. Many people must make do with what they already have, and that could mean unsuitable chairs that damage backs and necks.

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For a future that will likely involve more flexible working arrangements, companies will need to support their staff in ways that will add additional costs to an already reduced bottom line.

Con #4: Unique Distractions

Not all people have the benefit of being able to afford childcare for young children, and this means they need to balance working and taking care of their kids.

For many parents, being able to go to a workplace gives them time away from the noise and demands of a young family, so they could get on with their work. Working from home removes this and can make doing video calls almost impossible.

To overcome this, where possible, you need to set some boundaries. I know this is not always possible, but it is something you need to try. You should do whatever you can to make sure you have some boundaries between your work life and home life.

Final Thoughts

Working from home can be hugely beneficial for many people, but it can also bring serious challenges to others.

We are moving towards a new way of working. Therefore, companies need to look at both the pros and cons of working from home and be prepared to support their staff in making this transition. It will not be impossible, but a lot of thought will need to go into it.

More About Working From Home

Featured photo credit: Standsome Worklifestyle via unsplash.com

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