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Americans Should Stop Eating These Banned Foods ASAP

Americans Should Stop Eating These Banned Foods ASAP

Certain foods in developed countries are prohibited for a variety of reasons. Some foods are banned because they are dangerous and may increase risks of mental, emotional, and physical dysfunctions.  They’re also responsible for causing health disorders, such as cancer, damage to the nervous system, diabetes, birth defects, allergies, and more. The majority of Americans consume these dangerous food products, which are legally advertised and sold in grocery stores throughout the United States.

Some foods are banned in other nations because of cultural, sustainability, religious purposes; others for downright strange and weird reasons.  For instance, Singapore bans chewing gum because people would leave chewed gum everywhere. For more than 20 years, Singapore declared it illegal to sell or chew gum. However, in 2004, Singapore changed the law allowing citizens to obtain a doctor’s prescription for the 9,000-year-old substance.

Another strange example of banned foods in other countries is the use of ketchup in French schools. Chairperson of the National Association of Directors of Collective Restaurants, Christophe Hebert, said this about ketchup’s influence on France’s future generations: “We have to ensure that children become familiar with French recipes so that they can hand them down to the following generation” (The Telegraph).

However, when it comes to proving wholesome, healthy, and quality food products in the U.S., American food manufacturers fall short in comparison with other countries around the world. For instance, many of the banned foods in other countries are processed in North America using dangerous practices; most of them contain genetically-engineered ingredients, growth promoters, and harmful additives.

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Banned Foods Around the World

American health is deteriorating and spiraling down when compared to other industrialized countries, causing greater than before health care expenses and increased rates of preventable diseases.  The following are some banned foods that governments ban or strictly prohibit because of health concerns and in response to inhumane preparation processes.

Milk produced in the U.S. is on the list of banned foods in the European Union, Australia, Canada, Israel, and New Zealand. Nevertheless, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of the synthetic version of the hormone bovine somatotropin (BST), naturally produced in the pituitary gland of cows, which helps them produce milk.

Monsanto, an American multinational agrochemical and agricultural biotechnology corporation developed the synthetic version of BST called recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone (rBGH). However, in an attempt to protect its citizens from genetically modified milk, the United Nations Food Safety Agency banned rBGH milk in the 101 nations worldwide it represents. It is believed that exposure to rBGH in milk products increases the risk of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer.

Added to the list of banned foods are U.S. arsenic-based drugs approved as animal feed. Claims are that they make the meat fresher, pinker, and speed up animal growth. More than 70 percent of nine billion broiler chickens in the U.S. were fed the arsenic-based feed drug Roxarsone in 2007.

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Chronic arsenic exposure has been found to cause kidney damage or failure, an increased risk of miscarriages, infant mortality, low IQ and blood pressure, skin lesions, headaches, anemia, and an increased risk of diabetes. Arsenic-based drugs are on the list of banned foods in the European Union.

Dangerous Foods That Target Children

Banned foods by some countries are also targeted for young American children and infants. Many of these banned foods contain more than 3,000 food additives that researchers have linked to increase the risks of cancer, behavioral and birth defects, in addition to allergy-like hypersensitivity reactions in children. Synthetic ingredients, colors, flavoring, and preservatives are considered health risks and are found in macaroni and cheese, children’s cereals, Jell-O, and cheddar-flavored crackers.

The most popular dyes used in the U.S. are blue 2, yellow 5 and 6, and red 40. Australia and Norway added these food additives to their list of banned foods. The British government requested all food manufacturers refrain from using dyes in food products by the end of 2009. In addition, the European Union requires foods containing dyes must also have a warning label.

Banned foods containing potassium bromate in other parts of the world are allowed in the U.S. baked goods. Potassium bromate is linked to increased risks of cancer, thyroid problems, and kidney and nervous system damage. In the U.S., commercial bakeries use enriched brominated flour containing potassium bromate claiming it helps make the bread stand up on bread hooks better, while making it more elastic. Food products containing potassium bromate, like some bread, wraps, bagel chips, rolls, and breadcrumbs are banned foods in China, the European Union, and Canada.

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Some of the citrus flavored sodas and sports drinks sold in the U.S. contain the flame retardant brominated vegetable oil (BVO) and are listed as banned foods in other nations. BVO is found in drinks like Gatorade, Mountain Dew, Fanta Orange, Squirt, and Powerade, to name a few. BVO is linked to schizophrenia, birth defects, organ damage, hearing loss, and growth damage. Toxic levels of bromine may cause cardiac arrhythmia, acne, skin rashes, loss of appetite and fatigue.

Furthermore, BVO can cause cancer, hypothyroidism, autoimmune disease, and iodine deficiency. Japan and most countries in Europe added BVO to their list of banned foods; whereas, the U.S. still allows this dangerous chemical in a variety of soft drinks.

In the ’80s, nutritionists, dieticians, and healthcare professionals found that fatty foods caused increased risks of obesity, diabetes, and other maladies. A crusade to reduce the amount of unhealthy fats in food took place across the country.  In 1996, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the food additive olestra, which is an ingredient used to help eliminate fat in a variety of food products. Time magazine reported olestra as one of the worst inventions.

The Cleveland Clinic advises, “…foods touted as fat free or low fat are usually poor alternatives to an already low-nutritional value food such as fat free ice cream and olestra-laden potato chips.”

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The United Kingdom and Canada banned foods that contain the fat substitute known as olestra, or also referred to as olean. Olestra is free of calories and is used in “fat-free” products like French fries, chips, and Frito-Lay’s light chip products. Olestra causes digestive difficulties, such as diarrhea, fecal urgency, anal leakage, gastrointestinal disturbances, as well as looser and more frequent bowel movements. Olestra rapidly reduces and drains blood levels of important fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamins, A, D, E, and K.

Learning more about banned foods in other industrialized countries can optimize your health. Make it a practice to avoid potentially harmful, dangerous, and questionable food products that inundate American grocery shelves. For that matter, completely avoid all processed foods and choose raw, whole, and organic foods.

If you choose to eat meat and poultry products, organic, grass-fed beef and poultry raised on pastures are healthier choices.

If you would like to help your family and friends control their health, share this information about banned foods with them in order to assist them in making better and healthier alternatives as well.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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