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9.99 Out of 10, You Probably Have NOT Heard of These 11 Colors

9.99 Out of 10, You Probably Have NOT Heard of These 11 Colors

1. Sarcoline: According to encyclo.co, Sarcoline literally means flesh-colored. For the ladies, I got a tip for you (this one I got from a super model–wear a sarcoline colored high heels and you’ll look taller ’cause your legs will look longer.)

    2. Mikado: It’s a title given to an emperor in Japan. A comic opera written by W.S. Gilbert. It’s also one of the boldest yellows I know.

      3. Coquelicot: It’s the color of the plant’s flower that is red but is tinted orange, giving it a unique blend of the two colors. It’s vernacular term for wild corn poppy.

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        4. Glaucous: Wikepedia says it’s “bluish-grey or green”. It is used to describe the pale grey or bluish-green appearance of birds and of some plants. Sometimes it’s compared to the powdery color of grapes.

          5. Smaragdine means emerald green. Emerald is one of most  beautiful gemstones. It’s a variety of the beryl; a mineral that’s colored green due to trace amounts of chromium and sometimes vanadium. When you see the color smaragdine, you’ll remember emeralds.

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            6. Xanadu: It is a place of indescribable beauty, beyond luxury, and unspeakable contentment. The color of the philodendron leaf. A nice blend of gray and green that has a calming effect.

              7. Wenge: If you watch those house makeover shows on TV, you might have heard of the color wenge. A dark brown color of wood with the masculine undertones of copper. Wenge wood comes from the endangered legume tree known as Millettia laurentii, so it becomes rarer by the hour.

                8. Falu: It’s the red paint popularly used for barns and wooden cottages. The paint got its origins in the copper mines of Falun, Dalarna in Sweden. Till now it is still widely used because its an effective preservative for wood. 

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                  9. Amaranth: The color of the flowers of the amaranth plants. Obviously, the ones which have amaranth red colored flowers. It was in the year 1680 when it was first recorded to have been used to identify amaranth as a name of a particular color.

                    10. Fulvous: It is at times referred to as a brownish-yellow, or a dull reddish-yellow; sometimes tawny, and it can also be equated to a variation of beige, buff, or even butterscotch. It has also been used to describe certain varieties of fungi to identify a color with greater specificity.

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                      11. Eburnean: It is the color of ivory. If you have the eyes of a painter, or perhaps a good photographer, you will notice that eburnean is not really white. It has a touch of very light yellow. So, the phrase as white as ivory is in effect a misnomer.

                        Original Source: 11 Colors You’ve Probably Never Heard Of by Amanda Green via Mental floss

                        Featured photo credit: Rainbow in my hand/Laurence and Annie via Flickr.com via flickr.com

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                        Anthony Dejolde

                        TV/Radio personality who educates his audience on entrepreneurship, productivity, and leadership.

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                        Last Updated on July 10, 2020

                        How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries

                        How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries

                        We all have them—those hurtful, frustrating, offensive, manipulative people in our lives. No matter how hard we try to surround ourselves with positive and kind people, there will always be those who will disrespect, insult, berate, and misuse you if we allow them to.

                        We may, for a variety of reasons, not be able to avoid them, but we can determine how we interact with them and how we allow them to interact with us.

                        So, how to take control of your life and stop being pushed around?

                        Learning to set clear firm boundaries with the people in our lives at work and in our personal lives is the best way to protect ourselves from the negative effects of this kind of behavior.

                        What Boundaries Are (And What They’re Not)

                        Boundaries are limits

                        —they are not threats or ultimatums. Boundaries inform or teach. They are not a form of punishment.

                        Boundaries are firm lines—determined by you—which cannot be crossed by those around you. They are guidelines for how you will allow others to treat you and what kind of behaviors you will expect.

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                        Healthy personal boundaries help protect you from physical or emotional pain. You may also need to set firm boundaries at work to ensure you and your time are not disrespected. Don’t allow others to take advantage of your kindness and generosity.

                        Clear boundaries communicate to others that you demand respect and consideration—that you are willing to stand up for yourself and that you will not be a doormat for anyone. They are a “no trespassing” sign that makes it very clear when a line has been crossed and that there will be consequences for doing so.

                        Boundaries are not set with the intention of changing other people. They may change how people interact with you, but they are more about enforcing your needs than attempting to change the general behavior and attitude of others.

                        How to Establish Boundaries and Take Control of Your Life

                        Here are some ways that you can establish boundaries and take control of your life.

                        1. Self-Awareness Comes First

                        Before you can establish boundaries with others, you first need to understand what your needs are.

                        You are entitled to respect. You have the right to protect yourself from inappropriate or offensive behavior. Setting boundaries is a way of honoring your needs.

                        To set appropriate boundaries, you need to be clear about what healthy behaviors look like—what healthy relationships look like.

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                        You first have to become more aware of your feelings and honest with yourself about your expectations and what you feel is appropriate behavior:

                        • Where do you need to establish better boundaries?
                        • When do you feel disrespected?
                        • When do you feel violated, frustrated, or angered by the behavior of others?
                        • In what situations do you feel you are being mistreated or taken advantage of?
                        • When do you want to be alone?
                        • How much space do you need?

                        You need to honor your own needs and boundaries before you can expect others to honor them. This allows you to take control of your life.

                        2. Clear Communication Is Essential

                        Inform others clearly and directly what your expectations are. It is essential to have clear communication if you want others to respect your boundaries. Explain in an honest and respectful tone what you find offensive or unacceptable.

                        Many people simply aren’t aware that they are behaving inappropriately. They may never have been taught proper manners or consideration for others.

                        3. Be Specific but Don’t Blame

                        Taking a blaming or punishing attitude automatically puts people on the defensive. People will not listen when they feel attacked. It’s part of human nature.

                        That said, you do not need to overexplain or defend yourself. Boundaries are not open to compromise.

                        Sample language:

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                        • “You may not…yell or raise your voice to me…”
                        • “I need…to be treated with respect…”
                        • “It’s not okay when…you take things from my desk without asking…”
                        • “I won’t…do your work…cover for you anymore…”
                        • “It’s not acceptable when…you ridicule or insult me…”
                        • “I am uncomfortable when…you use offensive language”
                        • “I will no longer be able to…lend you money…”

                        Being able to communicate these without sounding accusatory is essential if you want others to respect your boundaries so you can take control of your life.

                        4. Consequences Are Often Necessary

                        Determine what the appropriate consequences will be when boundaries are crossed. If it’s appropriate, be clear about those consequences upfront when communicating those boundaries to others.

                        Follow through. People won’t respect your boundaries if you don’t enforce them.

                        Standing our ground and forcing consequences doesn’t come easily to us. We want to be nice. We want people to like us, but we shouldn’t have to trade our self-respect to gain friends or to achieve success.

                        We may be tempted to let minor disrespect slide to avoid conflict, but as the familiar saying goes, “if you give people an inch, they’ll take a mile.”

                        It’s much easier to address offensive or inappropriate behavior now than to wait until that behavior has gotten completely out of hand.

                        It’s also important to remember that positive reinforcement is even more powerful than negative consequences. When people do alter the way they treat you, acknowledge it. Let people know that you notice and appreciate their efforts.

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                        Final Thoughts

                        Respect is always a valid reason for setting a boundary. Don’t defend yourself or your needs. Boundaries are often necessary to protect your time, your space, and your feelings. And these are essential if you want to take control of your life.

                        Start with the easiest boundaries first. Setting boundaries is a skill that needs to be practiced. Enlist support from others if necessary. Inform people immediately when they have crossed the line.

                        Don’t wait. Communicate politely and directly. Be clear about the consequences and follow them through.

                        The better you become at setting your own boundaries, the better you become at recognizing and respecting the boundaries of others.

                        Remember that establishing boundaries is your right. You are entitled to respect. You can’t control how other people behave, but you do have control over the way you allow people to treat you.

                        Learning to set boundaries is not always easy, but with time, it will become more comfortable. You may eventually find that boundaries become automatic and you no longer need to consciously set them.

                        They will simply become a natural extension of your self-respect.

                        Featured photo credit: Thomas Kelley via unsplash.com

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