Advertising
Advertising

8 Vegan Eating Tips for Omnivores

8 Vegan Eating Tips for Omnivores

So things are getting interesting in the vegan world these days. The three biggies in “Gourmet World” — taste, texture, and presentation — are changing the landscape of healthy eating. You may be surprised to find out what you’re missing!

First, let’s make sure we are all on the same “foodie” page and define exactly what today’s vegan actually eats and does not eat. Here is the dictionary definition of vegan: “a strict vegetarian who consumes no animal food or dairy products; also: one who abstains from using animal products (as leather).” Since we are only delving into food options today, we will leave the other vegan lifestyle choices out of this article.

After speaking with the people who are actually creating all those delicious desserts and entrées for their vegan clients, the trend seems to be all about finding substitute ingredients and developing the skill to rework the recipes — intensifying the flavors, ensuring the textures are pleasing, and using elements that have color and form pleasing to the eye.

So here are our eight vegan eating tips for omnivores.

1. Consider becoming “vegish.”

Actually, you’re already a bit “vegish” if you are eating some vegetables and salads. List all the vegetables you like, then the ones you don’t like, then the ones you have yet to like or not like. Maybe you need to explore how they are prepared, whether they are organic (which usually tastes better), and most importantly, how they are seasoned.

Advertising

Here are some other eating lifestyles for you to check out. Just find the one(s) that suit you:

  • Flexitarians eat a mostly vegetarian diet, but occasionally eat meat. Many people who call themselves “flexitarian” or “semi-vegetarian” have given up red meat for health reasons, while others have done so for environmental reasons and only eat free-range or organic animals and animal products.
  • Pescetarians are chiefly vegetarians; however, they also eat fish.
  • Vegish is an otherwise vegan who still eats fish.
  • Vegetarians don’t eat meat or fish; however, they do eat animal byproducts such as milk and eggs.
  • Vegans eat no meat, fish, or animal byproducts.

2. Enjoy cooking more of your meals at home.

Start slowly by planning one dinner meal every week that explores a new vegan menu item. Meatless Monday is one way you can get started. Check out who has signed up here.

meatless monday

    Meatless Monday is not a new idea. During World War I, the U.S. Food Administration urged families to reduce consumption of key staples to aid the war effort. “Food Will Win the War,” the government proclaimed, and “Meatless Monday” and “Wheatless Wednesday” were introduced to encourage Americans to do their part. The result was overwhelming; more than 13 million families signed a pledge to observe the national meatless and wheatless conservation days.

    If you want to try some morning meals, check out some of our Lifehack authors’ posts. Helena Negru has gathered 20 vegan breakfasts full of protein and Tegan Jones has 10 more breakfasts, meals, and snacks. She also found 20 more to consider! 

    Advertising

    3. Host a vegish-based dinner party potluck.

    Ask your friends if they are interested in trying new dishes and make this a party project. Forward this article to them and see what happens. Go ahead and put some burgers on the grill and maybe even grill some veggies while you’re at it. Just have fun doing it!

    4. Frequent restaurants with vegan menu items.

    See what the pros are cooking! Some of our most successful home recipes are inspired by entrées we try at the fine restaurants we frequent. Even if you don’t order a vegan selection, ask how it is prepared and you just might get inspired!

    Here are the top 10 vegan entrées from “The Oregonian.”

    And here are the six vegan dishes from “America’s Best Vegetarian Restaurant Recipes.” Look for things like that the next time you are out dining or better yet, go ahead and try one at home!

    5. Do the math.

    Will adding some tastier vegan dishes to your diet save you money and extend your life expectancy? Probably, but you need to check your grocery shopping habits and see if you are paying for convenience at the expense of nutrition and taste. 

    Advertising

    6. Know your veggies.

    Look for local veggies that are organic and really fresh. There are more and more small farming operations that specialize in high-quality produce free from pesticides and added chemicals that taste better and are better for you. Here are 10 vegetables you could be eating that, if seasoned to your taste and prepared for freshness, could add some variety to your diet.

    Look for world veggies at specialty markets. Here, in a very entertaining slide show, are 14 vegetables from around the world that you may not have heard of. The truth is, the world is full of edible, healthy and flavorful roots, stems and leaves, the vast majority of which you’ve probably never tasted. In the spirit of culinary adventure, we hope this list will prompt you to titillate your palate with something new. Try replacing those carrots, potatoes, lettuce or celery with one of these exotic vegetables — that is, if you can find them.

    7. Use fresh herbs.

    Fresh tarragon and dill, grown naturally right in your own garden or indoor window garden, will add incredible flavor to carrots, green beans, pea pods, and your own favorite vegetable. Make sure you cook your veggies just enough to be tender and flavorful.

    image024dill

      8. Know your sugars (and other sweeteners).

      White sugar, (a big sweetener in our foods) is processed with bone char. While there are many sugar substitutes available (six are approved by the FDA), I will not be covering them in this article. Below you will find some other common sweeteners. And don’t forget: honey is an animal product!

      Advertising

      sugars

        Agave Nectar | Maple Syrup | Miel de Agave (article) | Truvia  | Molasses | Sorghum Syrup | Turbinado Sugar (brown sugar) | Sucanat (whole cane sugar) | Sugar Alcohol |

        Your body works very hard for you by taking what you eat and converting it to energy. Make sure you know what’s going on inside of you by doing your homework. Keep up with your health by checking in on the websites listed below.

        | How your liver works | How your intestines work | Digestion | Nutrition Data | Sugar & the brain |

        Maybe looking into the “vegish’ eating lifestyle will be more tasty, more nutritious, and even more inexpensive than what you are currently eating. Believe me, your body will thank you and your quality of living could very well improve.

        Bon Appetit!

        Featured photo credit: Chocolate Vegan Brownie/Jois de Vegan/Carolyn Busse-photographer via media.lifehack.org

        More by this author

        10 Powerful Movie Quotes That Will Change Our Lives Snapshot of La Petite Joie de Vegan chef The 9 Sagacities of Mining Your Snapshots 3 Things to Learn From Chefs Who Practice “Mise En Place” 5 Reasons to Keep Our Wine (Life) Glass Half Full 10 Navy SEAL Life Lessons You Can Use Every Day

        Trending in Health

        1 How to Find Weight Loss Meal Plans That Work for You 2 How to Manage Anxiety: Sound Advice from a Mental Health Expert 3 How to Start Eating Healthy No Matter How Old You Are 4 Understanding Intermittent Fasting Benefits: More Than Just Weight Loss 5 Top 9 Foods for Incredible Brain Health And Brain Power

        Read Next

        Advertising
        Advertising
        Advertising

        Last Updated on March 13, 2019

        How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

        How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

        Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

        You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

        Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

        1. Work on the small tasks.

        When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

        Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

        2. Take a break from your work desk.

        Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

        Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

        Advertising

        3. Upgrade yourself

        Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

        The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

        4. Talk to a friend.

        Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

        Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

        5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

        If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

        Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

        Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

        Advertising

        6. Paint a vision to work towards.

        If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

        Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

        Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

        7. Read a book (or blog).

        The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

        Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

        Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

        8. Have a quick nap.

        If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

        Advertising

        9. Remember why you are doing this.

        Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

        What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

        10. Find some competition.

        Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

        Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

        11. Go exercise.

        Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

        Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

        As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

        Advertising

        Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

        12. Take a good break.

        Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

        Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

        Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

        Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

        More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

        Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

        Read Next