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7 Strategies to Help Your Family Combat Holiday Stress

7 Strategies to Help Your Family Combat Holiday Stress

This is the time of the year when we should be having fun with our family and friends, but the truth is that the holidays can be very stressful for many of us. They present a series of demands that include shopping, entertaining, parties, and lots more. Because we tend to set high expectations for the holiday season, it is not surprising that most of us experience some holiday stress.

What causes holiday stress?

For many of us, most of our holiday stress results from interacting with our family. This might be caused by sad memories of past holiday seasons.  It might be caused by the changes that have occurred in the life of another family member, or by the changes that haven’t occurred in ours.  It might simply be caused by having to suffer through the same family gatherings, with the same people, and the same food.

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No matter what is causing your holiday stress, these 7 strategies can help you deal with your stress, and may even help make your family get-togethers fun again.

1. Acknowledge your feelings.

If you have lost a family member this year, the holidays can bring back feelings of sadness and loss.  Understand the fact that it’s okay to feel sad, and be willing to express your feelings to other family members. Sharing stories of the good times that you spent with a lost family member can help the whole family feel better.

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2. Set realistic expectations.

Speak to your children regarding holiday activities and their expectations for gifts. Holiday stress can be minimized by taking action to make sure everyone has the same goals and expectations for the holiday season. While you should never expect your family holidays to be perfect, you can minimize stress by making sure that the whole family has the same expectations.

3. Do something different.

If your normal family get-together is the source of your stress, try something different. If you’re overwhelmed with being the host, ask another family member to help out. You might even want to plan the family holiday dinner at a local restaurant instead of your home. Trying something new and different can reduce or eliminate your stress.

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4. Don’t expect miracles.

If your holiday stress comes from a history of family conflict, you shouldn’t expect any miracles during the holiday season. You probably will not see a huge break-through in ongoing conflicts, but you can focus on how you can react in positive ways when the conflict happens.

5. Just say no.

Saying yes when you know that you should be saying no can create feelings of resentment and overwhelm. Be honest with your friends and family, and help them to understand that you cannot participate in every event. If you find yourself in a situation where you can’t say no to a family event, look for other activities that you can remove from you schedule to minimize your stress.

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6. Set differences aside.

Accept your relatives for who they are, even if they don’t meet your expectations. Save grievances for a more suitable time, and be understanding if others get frustrated and angry. They are probably experiencing the effects of holiday stress too.

7. Prepare a budget.

Decide the amount you can afford to spend prior to food and gift shopping. Do not be forced to spend more than what you can afford. Follow your budget as much as possible and remember that happiness can never be bought with gifts.

I wish that I could help you to eliminate all of your holiday stress, but I can’t!  However, you can minimize it by employing these 7 proven strategies.

Featured photo credit: kakisky via cdn.morguefile.com

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Last Updated on September 25, 2019

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

As it appears, the human mind is not capable of not thinking, at least on the subconscious level. Our mind is always occupied by thoughts, whether we want to or not, and they influence our every action.

When we were still children, our thoughts seemed to be purely positive. Have you ever been around a 4-year old who doesn’t like a painting he or she drew? I haven’t. Instead, I see glee, exciting and pride in children’s eyes. But as the years go by, we clutter our mind with doubts, fears and self-deprecating thoughts.

Just imagine then, how much we limit ourselves in every aspect of our lives if we give negative thoughts too much power!

We’ll never go after that job we’ve always wanted because our nay-saying thoughts make us doubt our abilities.

We’ll never ask that person we like out on a date because we always think we’re not good enough.

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We’ll never risk quitting our job in order to pursue the life and the work of our dreams because we can’t get over our mental barrier that insists we’re too weak, too unimportant and too dumb.

We’ll never lose those pounds that risk our health because we believe we’re not capable of pushing our limits.

And we’ll never be able to fully see our inner potential because we simply don’t dare to question the voices in our head…

But enough is enough! It’s time to stop these limiting beliefs and come to a place of sanity, love and excitement about life, work and ourselves.

So, how can we tap into the power of positivity?

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“Happiness cannot come from without, it comes from within.” – Helen Keller

It’s not as hard as it may seem; you just have to practice, practice, practice. Here are 4 simple yet powerful ideas on how you can get started.

1. Learn to substitute every negative thought with a positive one.

Every time a negative thought crawls into your mind, replace it with a positive thought. It’s just like someone writes a phrase you don’t like on a blackboard and then you get up, erase it and write something much more to your liking.

Just take a look at these 10 Positive Affirmations for Success that will Change your Life.

2. See the positive side of every situation, even when you are surrounded by pure negativity.

This one is a bit harder to put into practice, which does not mean it’s impossible.

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You can find positivity in everything by mentally holding on to something positive, whether this be family, friends, your faith, nature, someone’s sparkling eyes or whatever other glimmer of beauty.

If you seek it, you will find it.

3. At least once a day, take a moment and think of 5 things you are grateful for.

This will lighten your mood and give you some perspective of what really is important in life and how many blessings surround you already.

Here’re 60 Things To Be Thankful For In Life that can inspire you.

4. Change the mental images you allow to enter your mind.

How you see yourself and your surroundings make a huge difference to your thinking.

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Instead of dwelling on dark, negative thoughts, consciously build and focus on positive, light and colorful images, thoughts and situations in your mind a few times a day.

Learn from this article how to change your mental images: How to Think Positive and Eliminate Negative Thoughts

If you are persistent and keep on working on yourself, your mind will automatically reject its negative thoughts and welcome the positive ones.

And remember:

You are (or will become) what you think you are.

This is reasonable enough to be proactive about whatever is going on in your head.

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Featured photo credit: Lauren Richmond via unsplash.com

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