Advertising
Advertising

7 TV Shows That Could Make You Smarter

7 TV Shows That Could Make You Smarter

Ever heard the phrase “television rots your brain”? Most probably said by your gran? Abigail Clark of Dumb Little Man has some shows that’ll make you smarter, so you can go and impress people with the knowledge you’ve gained from simply watching tv:

It’s easy to sit on your couch for endless hours watching TV shows that do nothing more than entertain you. After all, you don’t have to do anything besides change the channel and look at a screen. However, if you’re not in the mood to read a book or travel to a museum in your area, then tuning in to one of these shows is a good way to stimulate your mind and educate yourself.

MythBusters

MythBusters

    This science entertainment TV show is created and produced by Australia’s Beyond Television Productions. Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, the show’s hosts, use components of the scientific method to test the legitimacy or rumors, myths, adages, movie scenes, news stories, and Internet videos. At the end of each episode, the myths are either busted, plausible, or confirmed.

    Advertising

    Although most of the filming and experimenting takes place in San Francisco, some of the production elements occur in Australia. Some of the most popular episodes of the show include the alligator experiments in Florida and the shark and elephant myths in Africa. Through nine seasons, the team has completed 2,391 experiments and used 12 tons of explosives to test 769 myths.

    Sesame Street

    Sesame Street

      The first episode of this popular program aired Nov. 19, 1969. Since then it’s captivated kids with educational content creatively communicated through Jim Henson’s Muppets, short films, humor, cultural references, and animation.

      What makes this show so special is its cast of characters, like Big Bird, Elmo, and the Cookie Monster, who have personalities that make them relatable to the audience and qualities that teach them something in the process. The purpose of the show has always been to shape it using educational goals and a curriculum, reflecting the viewing habits of the audience and the changes in American culture. Since its inception, the show has become a case study on the educational benefits of TV programming and the effects its had on kids. Although the format has changed throughout the years, the main characters and core value have remained the same.

      Advertising

      Bill Nye the Science Guy

      Bill Nye the Science Guy

        What made this show so memorable was host Bill Nye’s personality. The premise for each episode was to teach a specific topic in science, using action and humor to intrigue the audience and make the subject interesting. Additionally, each episode contained a parody and music video summarizing it with lyrics substituting a popular song.

        Although the show originally aired on Sept. 10, 1993 and stopped its run at 100 episodes on June, 20, 1998, the show can still be seen on certain stations on TV. Many schools also still use it as an educational medium, too.

        Cash Cab

        Cash Cab originally aired in the United Kingdom, but has since been licensed to TV networks in other countries including the United States. Participants of this game aren’t aware they’re on a show until they step inside a city cab and host and stand-up comedian, Ben Bailey greets them. Contestants then have to answer a series of questions, which increase in difficulty, before they reach their destination.

        Advertising

        Once a contestant reaches their destination (if they’ve made it that far), they have the choice of risking their winnings or doubling them by answering a video question. Because of the format of the show and the trivia asked, this show is great for audiences wanting to learn something new while trying to answer the questions, too.

        Discovery Atlas

        Unlike the above mentioned shows, Discovery Atlas takes a more serious tone in educating viewers. It focuses on cultural, sociological, and natural aspects of countries in the world, exploring the different people, traditions, and lands found within them.

        Whether it’s following the lives of locals struggling to survive or examining the country’s history and culture, the show is a great example how TV changes the world by revealing hidden facts and truths about the regions it explores while informing the audience.

        Frontline

        Much like Discovery Atlas, Frontline is a program that produces in-depth documentaries about a variety of subjects. Since the series début on Jan. 17, 1983, there have been more than 500 films broadcasted.

        Advertising

        From examining the connections between organized crime, gambling, and professional football in the U.S, to taking a look at the most controversial educational reformers in the modern era, the show touches on just about every issue an audience can think of wanting to know more about.

        Nova

        Unlike Bill Nye the Science Guy, which simplifies the subject of science to educate younger viewers, Nova interviews scientists performing research in the topics covered and footage about a particular discovery. Some episodes have also focused on the history of science, taking an in-depth look at its roots. Examples of things covered in the show include: the Drake equation, the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, global warming, storm chasing, Tarim mummies, and moissanite.

        Whether you’re young or old, there’s a TV show to stimulate your mind. Which one do you like most?

        Abigail Clark is an upcoming freelance writer. She graduated from The University of South Florida with a bachelors in marketing, minoring in journalism. When she isn’t up to her neck in coupons she is enjoying the outdoors fishing. She loves doing reviews for technology, home products and beauty products. If you would like her to do a review for you look her up on twitter @downtownabby17.

        Use Your Brain: 7 TV Shows That Will Make You Smarter | Dumb Little Man

        More by this author

        Siobhan Harmer

        Siobhan is a passionate writer sharing about motivation and happiness tips on Lifehack.

        9 Ways to Stay Positive This Chart Shows You Where And Why Emotional Pain Becomes Physical Discomfort 30 Brilliant Camping Hacks I Wish I Knew Earlier 20 Fascinating Webcams You Can Watch Online Right Now 8 Ways To Stop Emotional Manipulation

        Trending in Leisure

        1 How to Enjoy Life In a Way Most People Don’t 2 25 Best Self Improvement Books to Read No Matter How Old You Are 3 30 Fun Things to Do at Home 4 10 Things Only Those Who Travel With Friends Understand 5 20 Creative Ways To Say Thank You

        Read Next

        Advertising
        Advertising
        Advertising

        Last Updated on January 21, 2020

        The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

        The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

        Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

        your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

          Why You Need a Vision

          Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

          Advertising

          How to Create Your Life Vision

          Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

          What Do You Want?

          The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

          It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

          Advertising

          Some tips to guide you:

          • Remember to ask why you want certain things
          • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
          • Give yourself permission to dream.
          • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
          • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

          Some questions to start your exploration:

          • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
          • What would you like to have more of in your life?
          • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
          • What are your secret passions and dreams?
          • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
          • What do you want your relationships to be like?
          • What qualities would you like to develop?
          • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
          • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
          • What would you most like to accomplish?
          • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

          It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

          Advertising

          What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

          Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

          A few prompts to get you started:

          • What will you have accomplished already?
          • How will you feel about yourself?
          • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
          • What does your ideal day look like?
          • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
          • What would you be doing?
          • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
          • How are you dressed?
          • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
          • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
          • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

          It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

          Advertising

          Plan Backwards

          It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

          • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
          • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
          • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
          • What important actions would you have had to take?
          • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
          • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
          • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
          • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
          • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

          Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

          It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

          Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

          Read Next