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7 Best Coffee Makers that Brew the Best Cup

7 Best Coffee Makers that Brew the Best Cup

Enjoying a cup of quality coffee is one of life’s little pleasures, and one which many coffee aficionados take really seriously. There are those that swear by their chosen method of brewing and what they perceive to be the perfect way to brew the best cup of coffee. For them, the idea of drinking a cup of ‘instant’ is a sacrilege and an insult to the glorious coffee bean! For them, the only way is properly ground coffee, a carefully selected choice from the numerous blends to choose from, originating from many different parts of the world. So, how do you decide on the best way to brew your coffee? Here are seven of the best coffee makers for a perfect cup of coffee:

French Press (cafetiere, coffee plunger pot or press pot).

The French press is an inexpensive and simple method of making a good cup of coffee. All that is needed to make coffee with a French press is hot water and coffee; no filters are required. The benefit of using a French press is that you are able to regulate the strength of your cup of coffee by having control over the length of brewing time that you allow. There is a certain enjoyable ritual to making coffee with a French press. Once the hot water has been added to the coffee, it can be taken to the table and allowed to brew while you relax and enjoy good conversation, or while reading your newspaper or a good book. When the appropriate brewing time has elapsed, pressing slowly down on the press and then pouring it into cups is all it takes to enjoy your coffee.

1. One of the best traditional-style French Press coffee makers on the market is the Bodum Chambord. It comes in a variety of sizes, has a quality chrome covered brass frame, and a removable and replaceable glass carafe. All pieces are safe to clean in the dishwasher.

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Bodum Chambord

    2. Another traditionally-styled model is the Stoneware French Press from Le Creuset. It is available in several different color choices, and does have a much different weight than glass and metal varieties. The Le Crueset is ideal for that rustic country look and will staying looking good for years.

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    Le Creuset french press (c)nwafoodie

      3. For a modern take on the French Press, the Frieling French Press fits the bill. Made from double-walled, polished stainless steel, it retains heat, prevents accidental burning of hands, and is tough and durable, as well as looking stylish enough to suit modern contemporary living.

      Frieling French Press

        The Moka pot.

        The Moka pot is a coffee maker you use on your stove or cooker. It works by using steam, under pressure, to pass hot water through ground coffee. It’s another traditional style of coffee making, originating from the 1930’s. Compared to some other coffee makers, a drawback of making coffee this way is having to have a stove to use it on, but the quality of the end result is said to be similar to coffee made in an espresso machine, and due to the way it extracts the flavour, can produce a stronger cup than by drip brewing methods.

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        4. The original, and regarded by many as still the best, is the the Bialetti Moka Express. Its design has allowed it to become a stylish icon, the original design being made of aluminium, and it comes in a variety of sizes.

        Frieling French Press

          5. Another quality moka pot is the Moka Pot Top. This is made by the Italian company Moka Pot. A significant difference between this and the Bialetti Moka Express is the titanium-alloy base, and the Moka Pot Top will work well on any cooking surface, including the modern induction hobs. They come in a range of different colors to complement your kitchen.

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          Pour-over coffee maker.

          The pour-over method is a simple way to produce quality coffee. The pour-over cone system was invented by Merlitta Bentz in 1908 and is regarded by many coffee aficionados as the best way to make coffee. A cone is placed in the top of a cup or carafe. A paper or material filter is placed inside this cone, and coffee is added. Water is slowly poured over the coffee grounds and the resulting coffee flows through a small hole in the bottom of the cone.

          6. The Chemex coffeemaker is an elegantly designed vessel made of high quality, heat resistant glass, with a heat resistant collar that acts as a handle. It was selected by the Illinois Institute of Technology as one of the 100 best designed products of all time.

          The Chemex coffeemaker

            7. The Hario Cafeor Stainless Steel Dripper is different in that it doesn’t use filters that need replacing. Instead, it has a fine metal mesh that allows more of the coffee’s oils to pass through, giving the resulting coffee more body than can be achieved using paper filters.

            How does coffee compete with these ‘naughty’ foods and drink?: What Drinking Coffee Does to You

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            Last Updated on April 8, 2020

            Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

            Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

            Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

            Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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            Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

            However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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            The leap happens when we realize two things:

            1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
            2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

            Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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            Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

            My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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            In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

            “Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

            Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

            More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

            Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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